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MAGAZINE 











The 1938-9 issue of tb 



H 



t; 



Hornby 



hands of every railway enthusiast. 




of Trains" should be in the 



The beautilul coloured cover shows a striking picture of the famous 



it 



Cornish Riviera Limited," specially painted 




the well-known 



artist Bryan de Grmeau. The contents of the Book are more varied than 

ever. They include articles, fully illustrated by splendid photographs, 

dealing with Hale-known features of railway goods traffic, automatic 

How to obtain 

The Hornby Book ot Trains may be obtained ?»om any Meccano dealer, 

price 3d, or direct frcm Meccano ltd. (Dept A M.| r Btnns Road. Liverpool 
13, price 4Jd posi free. In the latter case a temitiance jn stamps should 
be sent and the oame and address of the sender should be clearly written, 
Reader? living ir> Austral;*, New Zealand or South Attic? *+>o require 

AUSTRALIAN AGENTS: £. G, Page & Co.. 12, Oaren» St., Svdnev 
{P O. Box 1832*1 

ZEALAND AGENTS Models- Limited, Pavfcers Buildings, Arvar 
Avenue. Auckland CI IP O. Box 129). 



tram control on the G.W.R., the famous L.N E R. and L.MS, expresses 
on the London-Scotland routes, the mysteries of the Travelling Post 

Office, and the Continental Boat Trains of the Southern Railway. 

In addition the Book forms a complete catalogue of Hornby Trains lor 
electric and clockwork railways. All the Hornby Locomotives, Rolling 
Stock and Accessories are beautifully illustrated in full colour, 







e 



Book 





copies should send rheir postal orders tor 8d, (which includes postage] to 
the addresses (liven below the Meccano Branch at Toronto will d^al with 
Canadian orders and the price is 15 cenis postpaid- 

Readers living in countries other than those meniioned should ord^i 

from Meccano Lid., Binns Poad, Liverpool 13 # sending 6d< in stamps 
with their otoer 

SOUTH AFRICAN AGENT: Arthut E, Harris, 142, Market Street, 
Johannesburg |PG. Bo* 1199J 

CANADIAN BRANCH. Me^ano Ltd, 187-189, Church 5irMl. Toronio. 






Publi 




sne 




by 



MECCANO 



LTD 



(Dept. 



A.M.), 



BINNS 



ROAD, 



LIVERPOOL 



13 






MAGAZINE 



i 



FOOTBALL EDITION 



GROW 




FT 



1 




BE 




GRASS 



TALLER 



200 




' 



REGENT 







LONDON W.I 



Telephone: REGENT 3161 



OUR ONLY ADDRESS 









HOPPER 



No. 34 



November, 1938 



/ 



'■ 














Vastly different from ordinary roller skates, this 
specially designed model has three big, ball-bearing 



HAMLEY 



j 





mounted wheels, wi 




ru 



bb 



er tyres. Now you can 




GRASSHOPPERS 



skate on any hard surface at greater 

and greater comfort. Solidly 



PRICE 






an 



com 



strongly ma 
pi eta 



3ue 



WI 








s 









POST 6d. Foreign 



The POGO 

STICK provides 








constant amuse- 





ment for 

boy and girl. An 



attractive 




col- 



oure 




stick 



wi 




spn 




action. 




All the working parts are here 



an 






all you 



em 




to do 



is to 






r 







ow a aoc 







really 



yo u rse I f 

works. Fully illustrated manual. 



PRICE 




A most attrac- 
tive knife fitted 
with 



PRICE 



_ 



compresse 




ea 



the 






r 



ha 



n 




e 




and 
blad 



Sheffie 




POST Gd. 




e. Complete in 

eath. 



earner s 










PRICE 




JUVENILE SIZE 



I 













Postage 3d. 







On STILTS 




e 



CARRIAGE 1i- 



o 







traditic 



ona 








o 



I 




or 



boys and girls of 







an ages 




as h 



e 







FIRST TIME 




e 



place 



o 






onour in every 



generation 




with ad- 




A schoo 
made 



ball 



specially 

or Hamley's. 
Constructed 

strong hide 




* 



SIZE 3 



Price 




/ 



11 



SIZE 4 



Price 




/ 




SIZE 5 




10 



/ 




POST Bd 







e 




justa 
rests. Ru 

hand-grips, foot- 




er 





a 



ehrninates 



en 











sup 



PRICE 






PRICE 







POST 2i! 



CARRIAGE 1/- 




ALONG 



A special ball* 
bearing skate 

made by one o! 
the leading 



American skate 

manufacturers* 

Self guiding and 
adjustable. Suit- 
Is for boys or 

girls. 

PRICE 







POSTAGE Gd. 



4 * 

11 



THE MECCANO MAGAZINE 







DETECTIVE! 



m 




-, 



.■;■- 









1*1«T*> *f* 



r^Ji 



' 



Imagine 



v5 



thrill 



being an amateur 



"CXD." man. With this new 



you can 



detect finger prints and make complete finger 
print records of your family and friends. There 
is also a sensitive Detc^ taphonc* enabling you 
to listen an secretly to conversations in other 
rooms. Information book phows the way 

endless amusement* 

Price 



;. 



I 



. 



-- i» 









one 



e s e 



instructive 



- 



- *.**• 







It-binding discoveries with a microscope , . * fascinating stunts 



with electricity and magnetism . . , chemical magic 



fun as an amateur detective 



• > 



are some o 



f the 



en 



inc 



amusement you 



enjoy with GILBERT 



thrilling 

thralling 

tfits. 






Instructive, ingenious, 
knowledge while you reve 



en a 



gain exciting new 
never-ending fun. You'll never 



have a dull moment if you have a GILBERT gift for clever boys. 

■ 



4 



4 






Amazing Secrets Revealed 

a MICROSCOPE 



Weird secrets invisible to the na 



eye arc 






reve 



si led 






t pow c r 

Gilbert Micro-Chemistry Outfits. A drop of 
water is .seething with strange life I The micro- 



scopes are 



grade Instruments 



itch 



magnify over 200 times. Sets include 



POLAROID 



reve 






unseen 






f- ■ 






microscopy; 



also 



beauties usually 

icala 






ir.rmc 









and parts for fascinating experiments* 



M sera-Chemistry 



No, 7« Super Outfit * 






12'6 

21'- 



_.■«. -■ 



I. 



> 



■ 



Wonderful New 



"Ulli 



:n& 






il ifr 






ELECTRIC TRAINS 



LX*c 






are now made in a greatly improved form 



ese famous train: 
the Gilbert Co. Built to scale from actual railway blue-prints, they 

arc remarkably realistic, Amazing pulling power is given by extremely 

robust electrical mechanism* The trains can be operated by remote 

control. The Pullman Cars and Locomotives arc lighted and have 

automatic couplers. Every detail of the trains is exactly like the real 

thing. There arc Passenger, Goods and Miniature Train Sets. 
Wonderful g 



Am* 



*l 9 



*!* 



•**!" 






If*-' 



READ 



T I C 



SCALE MODELS 



REMOTE 
CONTROL 



AUTOMATIC 

COUPL 

Sets from 



M 



>'il< 



* i 



Have your own 
CHEMISTS LABORATORY 






I 



■ 



>* 



CHEMISTRY 



h 



II 



I J 



AJ ! 



ii 



^TT 



FASCINATING 



ELECTRICAL 



OUTFITS 



that Teach 



- i 






Electricity ts an 

enthralling 
and Gilbert Elec- 
tric nl Outfits teach 
all about building 

an electric motor, 

fixing up bell and 
busier systems and 

ouse lighting, etc. 

Fascinating stunts 

can be done with 

Static electricity arid 

magnetism. Un- 

believable tricks can be performed 

the Gilbert "Electric Eye/ 1 

■ 

Magnetic Fun and Facts 
Electric Motor Kit - - - 
Electricity and Magnetism 

Gilbert "Electric Eye" «* - 
No* 10; Electrical Set 



K 



r i 



with 






Entertain 

Family 



MYSTO -MAGIC 
CONJURING 



I 



TRICKS 



You 



mystifying conjuring displays 



can gi 

with a "Mysto* Magic" Set. You'll always be 
"the life ot the party"— and will get invitations 



everywhere. These sets contain ingenious trie 



nor found in any 
mystify ing, the tricks 






other sets. Although 
are easy to perform. 



liven the smallest outfit contains twelve sur- 



prising tricks. 



rom 



contain 



Gilbert Chemistry Outfits are real laboratories 

in stand-up 

equalled supply of chem 

for performing hundreds 

chemical magic. 



un- 
atus 



experiments in 



1 Outfit. 5/- No. 3 Outfit, 12*6 

No, 2 Outfit, 7/6 Na 6 Outfit, 2K- 



■II 1 ' ■"'! 



I 



AM 



m * 



• 



■ 




Don't he disappointed! If you have any difficulty in 
obtaining Qilhcrt Outfits or American Flyer Trains 

your ord 
returned at once in full if not satisfied, 



locally , sen 

Cash 





vith Postal Order — direct 



us. 



Where's your pen or pencil? Post the coupon at once! 






I 



«" 



i ■ 



t. 



* Tfj? 



THE&C GILBERTC0.,109,Ki 



LondonW.C.2 



d me, ab 






Qllben O 



, \'Our 



slv 



ivnc V^iv-r' 



■ •» * 



*n «.*»•'•■■ 



«,*»**«-****" 



,.*♦■■*•••■• 



LETt 



tess..~ 



■ # + ■*■* 



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m ■ m - - - * 4 ■ " ' 



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NOV* 



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...■*•-•*** 



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w^i*.^^-"** 1 



. ■ 













MECCANO MAGAZINE 



III 








ALL TO SCALE CLOCKWORK TOYS 

Almost every tvpe of vehicle on the road represented; some with ELECTRIC 
LIGHTS. Strongly constructed and fitted with powerful, long-running mechanism, 
they will run anywhere, EVEN ON THE CARPET. Each model Is beautifully finished 

in a variety of colours, and packed singly in an attractive box. 



b 




* 



Ml NIC Traffic Control Car 
LENGTH 5 Ins. Price 1/6 




MINIC £100 Saloon 

LENGTH 3| ins. 

Price 6d. 




MINIC Tax. 
LENGTH 4[ in*. Price 2/ 



MINIC Daimler Sunshine Saloon 
with Electric Headlamps and Battery, 
LENGTH Si ins. Price 3 6 

Without Electric Lights 2/6 




MimC VAlfXHAU CAMIOtfT 

LENGTH 5 Ins. Price I/- 








MINIC Searchlight Lorry 
Electric Searchlight and Battery. 
LENGTH 5i Ins. Price 3/6 



with 



MINIC Breakdown Lorry 
with Mechanical Crane. 
H 




5* ins 



Price 3/6 



TRI-ANC 



r 



k 










British Patent 479430, Patents pending in other Countries. 







SERVICE STATIONS 






Specially Designed for Your Minics 








* N» 3 SERVICE STMIOW. 



MINIC Service Station No. 3 

Realistic design. Imitation red tiled roof with sign* three 

pumps, one large oil cabinet, two electric lights and battery, 

face and other signs. LENGTH 16 ins. 

CARS NOT INCLUDED. OTHER MODELS from l/l I to 32/6 



large petrol 

dummy clock 

Price 9/11 



BOYS! 

Learn the Principles of Engineering Mechanics 

MINIC 

Construction Set No, 1 





XfiJ- MtNIC CONSTRUCTION SET H'l 

A complete set of parts for making six types of MINIC all to scale 
M ^ v - - models. All parts, including powerful clockwork 







parts. 
motor units, sire made with precision tools and machines. Full 
Instructions and tools are Included in each set which is packed 
In a handsome oak finished cabinet 18 Ins. x 9| ins, x 2i ins. 

PRICE IS/- 



TRI-ANC GYRO-CYCLE 



Astonishing 







Robot 





eaa 



Cyclist 



• 



The GYRO-CYCLE is an amusingly clever coy. The gay little 
figure astride the saddle appears to balance himself as he pedals 
merrily all over the place, and with his flexible arms creates 
the illusion m the most realistic way that he is steering the 
Gyro-Cycle by the handle bars. 



The Gyro-Cycle will perform the most amazing evolutions for 
over one minute. Ask your dealer to give you a demonstration* 






PRICE ONLY 






ii 



Makers of the famous 




TOYS 



TRI-ANG 



TRI-ANC WORKS, MORDEN ROAD, LONDON S.W.19 




TRf-ANG 



i 









IV 



THE 







MAGAZINE 







PERFECT 
SCALE MODELS 








OVER 300 




Collecting Dinky Toys is one of the 



fascinating of all hobbies. These realistic miniatures are unique in their rich colouring and perfection of design and 



finish, 



their range is so wide 



military Tanks and Aeroplanes, 

Every 
separately or in complete sets. 



appeal 



tastes. This season many new items have been introduced including wonderful 



models 



■ ■ 



types of Motor Cars, complete 









already done 



should start 



passenger, 



many others. 



collecting hobby to-day. 



models can 



either 



PETROL STATION 



PETROL PUMPS 



VEHICLES 



FILLING 'AMD 
SIRVICE STATION 



•4«4<* 



L fc 



1 M . I - 



!*" i 



Dinky Toys No, 48 

Accural© reproduction of a filling station 






Price 1/3 each 



MOTOR TRUCK 



STREAMLINED SALOON 



::: 



I. 

I 






1 



f* 



V* 



•: 



■ ■ ' 



k 






> . 



* .■ 



Scale models 



l 



i 



K ■ 






Toys No. 49 
with rubber hose pipes 






j 



#** 



• ■ ■ 



••• 



** P 



Bowser Pump 

Wayne Pump 

Theo Pump 
Shell Pump 
Oil Bin [Pratfs 

Price of complete 

REFUELLING TENDER 



*»* 



#** 



Finished in correct 



each 



* tf 4 



##t 



*** 






«V'# 



■ 1 ■ 



p ** 



m * * 



i 1f3 



BEACON 






3d. 


No, 


3d. 


No, 


3d. 


No. 


3d, 


No. 


3d. 


No. 



-1 



30 A 



30B 



30 D 



$w 



Dinky Toys No, 30 
Fitted with detachable rubber 

Si I vet -plated radiators. 
Chrysler "Airflow" Saloon 

Rolls-Royce 
Daimler 

Vamthall 



. - . 



50 C 



30 G 



4 



each 



■ »* 



*«P 



m m m 






m *># 



1*4 






Breakdown Car 

Caravan Trailej 

Pike of complete ser 3/11 



,, 



* * * 






AMBULANCE 



BOX VAN 



Dinky Toys No* 22c 
Assorted colours. Fitted with 
detachable rubber tyres. 
Price 6d. 



Dinky Toys No. 22h 

Assorted colours. Fitted with 

detachable rubber tyres. 

Price 4d. each 



j* 



i 



' •' ■■ V 



P- M\ 






■ 



DOUGLAS 



LINER 



A scale model olaDou 
D.C3 air liner, a type in 
regular service on Ameri- 
can and European routes. 

Price 9d, each 



- N 



r& 



EMPIRE FLYING BOATS 



Dinky Toys No. 60y 
Realistic model of Thompson 
Bros. Tender used for refuel* 
ling aeropfanes at aerodromes. 

Prrce fid. each 



Dinky Toys No, 47d 
Rea fistic model of »he 
Belisha Safety Beacon. 

Id. each 






AIRSPEED "ENVOY" MONOPLANE 



Dinky Toys No 301 
Filled wi|h,deteehafcle rubbe* 
tyres, finished in grey, with 
red cross Stjrer-piaied 
radiator Price 6d. each 



Fitted 



Dinky Toys No 
with dotac 



lyres 



Price 8d. 



R.AJ\ AEROPLANES 



Dinky Toys No. 60 r 

Scale models oi ihe latest Imperial Airways Flying Boats. 
Twelve models available named: "Caledonia/' 
"Canopus," "Corsair/' "Challenge!," "Centurion," 
•'Cambria/' "Calpumia," "Ceres." "Clio." 
"CalvfW "Corinn.i" and "Cheviot," Price 1/- 



ATLANTIC FLYING BOAT 

Dinky Toys No. 60x 
in type to the Empire Flying float, 



colours 



Price 1J- each 



AEROPLANES 






Dinky Toys No. 
Scale model of the Airsp^ 
eng in eq com mere ra] 
colours. 



Envoy" twin 
Assorted 
Price 6d, each 



THE KING'S AEROPLANE 

Dinky Toys No, 62k 
Scale model of the Airspeed "Envoy** 
supplied to ihe Air Council for the King's Flight, 

Price Bd. each 






Ml 



Dinky Toys No, 61 



*** 



60h "Singapore* 1 Flying Boat 
60n Fairy "Bailie" Bomber {2)... 
60p Gloster "Gladiator" Biplane (2) 

Price of complete sei 2! 9 



.,# 



• «• 



60M 



each If- 



«•» 



>■ 



H 



MEDIUM BOMBER 

Dinky Toys No. 60s 
Similar to Fairev "Ballte" Bomber {No. 60n], bur with new 
Ministry Shadow Shading. Price 6d. 






ARMSTRONG WHITWORTH 
"WHITLEY" BOMBER 



FLYING BOAT "CLIPPER III 






Dinky Toys No, 6Qz 

- 






The set consists of six models of famous French aeroplanes— M Arc-en-Ci©1," Potaz SB, Hanriot H18QT, 
Breguet-Corsaire low wing monoplane, Dewoitine 500 and Cierva Autogiro, (Made in the Meccano 
Factor in Parfc) Price ft 

E M ARC-EN~CIEL." Dinky Toys No. 60az 
A Scale model of the famous French triple-engined monoplane ^Arc-en-CieL" (Made in tho 
Meccano Factory in Paris) Price 9d. each 



Dinky Toys No. 60v 

Scale model of the "Whitley" 

long-range heavy bomber 

adopted by the R.AJF. 

Price 9d, each 



Dinky Toys No, 60w 
Scale model of the Pan American Airways 
flying boat that took part in the transatlantic 

experimental flights in 1937 

Price 1/- each 






MECCANO 



LIVERPOOL 



i 






• 



• . 



THE MECCANO MAGAZINE 



V 




A FASCINATING 
COLLECTING HOBBY 




FINISHED IN 
RICH COLOURS 



THUNDERBOLT" SPEED CAR 



SIX WHEELED WAGON 



TAXI WITH DRIVER 



DOUBLE DECKER BUS 






« 4 



DUNLOP tykes 






Dinky Toy* 
No, 23m 

A fine scate model 



at Bonneville, Utah, 



of iho car in which Cap*. 
L T. Eyston set up a world 
jd record of 357.50 m.p,h 
■nil/. Price 11- each 



GARAGE 



4 



■ ■ i ■ ■ ■ ■ 

■-■- A 

; S 

v. \f> I +*> 



..- - :•» 



) ■■■ ■ I ■ ■ ■ ■"■ 



'.".■ 



I 



| 



kK 



Fitted 



Dinky Toys Mo. 45 

wilh opening double doors. Will accommodate 
any two Dinky Toys Motor Cars. 

Price 1/3 each 









Dinky Toys No. 25s 
modal of a modern 

wagon, fn assorted colours. 

Price \h each 



ton 



Filled 



Dinky Toys No. 36g 

wilh detachable rubber 

Prke 1 1 d. oach 



tyres. 



POLICE MOTOR CYCLIST 
Dinky Toys Ho, 37b 



w 






Price 6d. each 



CIVILIAN MOTOR CYCLIST 

Dinky Toys No. 37a 



*fl 



Assorted colours. Price 6d» each 









Royal Corps of Signals Despatch Rider. Dinky Toys No. 37c 

Similar to Dinky Toys No. 37b, Finished in correct colours 
Fitted with solid rubber wheels. Price Gri. each 



Dinky Toys No. 29c 
Assorted colours. Fitted wilh 

rubber tyres* 
Pried 11- each 

POSTAL SET 



I Li 



9-r- - ■*■ 



v *:. 












12e 



1?c 



. 






I 



RAILWAY MECHANICAL HORSE AND TRAILER VAN 



ROYAL TANK CORPS LIGHT TANK SET 






■ ... 






EXPRESS 



I 



*= I 



J a%**h 



Dinky Toys No. 33 R 
Fined with detachable rubber tyres 



33Ra Railway Mechanical Horse 
33Rd Trailer Van 



*•• 



»4* 



#«• 



each 8d 

10d 



Prico, complete, L.M.S.R., L.N.ER. 
G.W.R. or S.R. ... 1 16 



SMALL CARS 






f 



Dinky Toys No. 35 
No. 35a Saloon Car 



Filled with solid rubber w 



each 3d, 



No. 35b Racer 



*** 



i* • 



No, 35c "KG," Sports Car.,* 

Price of complete set 9d. 

BATTLESHIP "DUNKERQUE" 

Dinky Toys No. 53ai 



4»4 



I52c 



152a 



150 d 



152b 



Dinky Toys No. 152 
No. I52a Light Tank (4£ tons, 



25 h.p.) 



t ■» 



each 



No. 152b Reconnaissance Car 
No. 152c Austin Seven Car 

No. 150d Driver 

Price of 



*■« 



ete set 



AUSTIN SEVEN CAR 



Dinky Toys No. 35d 

This model is the same as No. 152c, illustrated 
above, except that it is finished in a range of 
different colours. 



Price 



each 



Mt* I' 



34b 



Dinky 

No. 12a Pillar Box, G.P.O. 
No. 12b if , # Air Mail 
No. t2c Telephone Call Box 
No. 12d Telegraph Messenger 
No. 12e Postman 



No. 12 



■ Hi * 



*»* 



*P# 



■ ** 



mmm 



.«, 



■ * 






• -• 



+ .• 



No. 34b Royal Mail Van „. 

Price of complete set 213 



PAVEMENT SET 






• 



1 



r- 



1. 






+ ■* 



each 3d. 

3d. 
4d. 

3d. 

3d. 

tOd. 



1 Dinky Toys No. 46 

The contents of this set are four 3 in,, $m 6 in. and four 
12 in. strips of pavement and four quarter discs for 

Price of complete set 6d_ 



corners, 



SEL RAIL CAR 



THREE-WHEELED 
DELIVERY VAN 



■ 



" 



■ i 



« jfiD/a 



* ,# 



&*•£ 



r f "* ■ 

B ma ■ ■ £ 



r I fe P I 



Seal© modal of the French 26,500 ion Battleship u Bunkerque P " which has an ove 
9 in., and a main armament of eight 13 in. guns. 

[Made in the Meccano Factory in Pans.) 

STREAMLINE DIESEL ARTICULATED TRAIN 



length of 702 ft. 
Pfico 9(L each 



Dinky Toys 
A realistic model of 

engined rail car 

(Made in Ihe 



No. 26z 

a modern Diesel- 

Price 5d. each 
Factory in Pans.) 



r 



I 



Dinky Toys No. !4z 

Fitted with opening lid. 

Price 1QfL each 

(Made in the Meccano Factory 

in Paris.) 






■ 



Dinky Toys No. 16z 



Price 1/B each 



[Made in the Meccano Factory in Paris.) 






BINNS 



ROAD 



i 






VI 



THE MECCANO MAGAZINE 






ELECTRIC MOTOR 
DRIVEN 

POWERFUL an 

A marvellous present 

worker. Will cut up to $ in* plywood 

and to the centre of a 24 iru circle. 

Cutting t3b!e 8 in. square, combined belt 
pulley and 8 in. diarn. sanding disc. 

Overall length, 18 in. Height to cop of 
frame t 121 in. Maximum width 8 in* 

Universal motor. 



FRETSAWS 

SPEEDY 

the serious 





For A,C, or B.C. 
maim. 209/250 volts. 




- ■ 

Carriage 2/— England or Wales* 



Obtainable only at Gamagcs 

NOVEL JUNCTION RAILWAY 



Entirely new. Two 
fitted with brake, 
releases the second 
which runs out of 
the station in the 
opposite direction, 
thfc continuing* un- 
til clockwork runs 
down. Included in 



trains each possessing strong c 
one train* on entering rhe 



The 



lockwork locomotives, 
station* automatically 






this magnificent set 
are two stations, 
tunne! 4 signal, sig* 

nal box f length of 
oval track and 
automatic 

switches, 







Post 6d t 

GAMAGES, HOLBORN, LONDON E.C.I 



Wonderful 
Value 





VERTICAL 
STEAM 

ENGINES 

A splendid model, 
representing 

unbeatable value. 
Practical, and we 
made throughout. 

Complete with 
Safety 

Whistle, Filler, 
Can and 




Height 
lOJin 

Post Gti 




STEERABLE CAR 






Yet another clever novelty — the car 
that can be Automatically steered 
at wlU, on table or floor* Fitted 
with four-speed gear and 

stop lever Supplied with 

twelve wooden obstacle *. 



pillars, ball* and full des- 
criptive leaflet showing 
how a num- 
ber of games rtf""* 

can be play- /* 11 
ed. : II 

Extra con- 
trol wires 
2d, each. 








\ 



*••** 



• ** 





%• 



I 



**. 



Post 4d. 




EPISCOPES 



at 



HALF 



PRI 





Electrically Illuminated, 
Gives a picture 36x27 ins. 

A wonderful machine which repro- 
duces on a screen brilliant, distortion- 
less enlargements of any opaque 

objects, such as snapshots, photo* 

prints, coloured pictures, cigarette 
cards, microscope slides, sketches, 
etc.. up to quarter plate stae f without 

any special preparation. Complete 

with flex, adaptor and two print 

carriers. 



For A.C* or DX. Mams, 
Volt axe 200*220 1 230-250 

■ 

PUdsc state voltage* 




Post Fret 






•Phone HOiiorn 54S4. 



City Branch: 107, Cheapsidc, E.CJ 











"WHIZZY GOLF 



ft 




An entirely new game of skill played 

on a self-contained board. No loose 

to get mislaid. Fascinating and 
entertaining, being a form of go 

. Various other games can 






ate 





be played. 








CARPET BOWLS 



A set of eight Bowls, beautifully 

Bakelite, with 




Write for Illustrated List M.M.G.3 

from the makers: 

Brookes & Adams Ltd., Hockley, B'ham 19 






made in 

"bias" moulded 

Standard No, 2 

supplied unless otherw 



m 

bias" 








fied. A lighter No. 1 

smooth 



speci- 
" for 

can be had if 



ise 

"bias 




carpets 

desired, 

in four colours in two 
combinations: 

R/Y Set, Red-White-Blue-Yellow. 
G/G Set. Green-Pink-Mauve-Grey. 

Rules, 















Boxed com 



White plain 




with 

and 



small 



Rubber Mat. 



2 inch "Popular" size 10/6 per set 
2 -J inch "Senior" size 18/6 per set 



I 



* 



MM^Mjd 



PLAYTIME TEA SET, 10'6. 



Complete 

for four. 




A genuine "Bandalasta" Tea 
Set. Alt the parts 
reproductions of 






are small 



41 



full 



pieces 

1 L 



size 

Every 



Bandalasta 11 

piece interchangeable ensuring 

that in the event of accidental 

damage the set does not 
become useless, replacement 

parts can be obtained from the 



dealer at the prices below 




Cups and Saucers ... 
Cups or Saucers only 6d. 

. 6d. 
2/6 

. 6d. 

. 6d. 



each 






Plate 

Tea Pot (complete) 
Cream Jug ... 
Sugar Bowl 

Stainless Metal Tea- 



*■ 



I* 



9* 



fl 



spoons 



4 ■ • 



« •• 



3d 



rt 











MAGAZINE 




What boy doesn't like 







■ 




b ? 



s: 



MODELS 



Making things in \vood for himself o 



) 






even 





for 



a 



littl 



e 




his friends? Or 

pocket money? Try Hobbies 

yon will be delighted at the variety 

of practical and saleable things yon can 

make. Free designs are vituen ivitl 



TOYS 



CLOCKS 




PU 




ZLES 



given 



i 



Hobbies Weekly— 2d. every Wednesday 
of 



BOXES 



" 




news 




fro m 



Com 
r 6. 




ete tool sets 



TRAYS 








PRES 




NTS 



FREE! 5d? "** a t* 05 * ear<i s° r 

' l ■— ■— interesting leaflets and 
specimen "Hobbies" to Dept, 90, 
ties Ltd., Dereham, Norfolk, 




vu 



r 

i 
i 
i 



t 







284-PAGE HANDBOOK 

The 193» Handbook is packed* with 
articles On making hundreds of everyday 
things, Also larjie free design charts, 
value 2/-, font model Big Hen, a Paddle 
Steamer electrically driven, :md a ' 
,*t ,i „-wj u.^ obtainable at 



I 
I 
I 

I 



I 




coloured calendar 

all newsagents or 

or sent post free 
below. Every l">v 



ironmongers for tnl., 
9d. from address 



lobbies tools, wood, designs, etc., are sold 

by ail leading Ironmongers and Stores. Or ^3*jj 
Hobbies own branches in London. Glasgow, ■.■;>* 



Manchester, etc. Order also by post from 



HOBBIES 



LTD., 



DEREHAM, NORFOLK 




■ ■-■; 

■ ^-rr* 



WS23 



* 



i" - 



T*" 



SECURE 






WITH 



I' A 



MMCNDOuS 



AVITY 












An efficient light at walking speed, when with the usual Bulb there (s no light. 
A broad and better light illuminating the whole road — both immediately in front, 

Sides, far ahead, and without any dark patches. 
Greater voltages output — over 13 volts from 6-vok Dynamo at 15 m.p.b.— as 

certified by the National Physical Laboratory. 

FOR USE WITH LUCAS: LSF Silk Frosted I/-; LSC Clear I Id. 
FOR USE WITH MILLER; MSF Silk Frosted I/-; MSC Clear I Id, 
FOR USE WITH SEECO: SSF Silk Frosted I/-; SSC Clear I Id. 

Also Supplied for Sturmey-Archer when the main advantage 
consists of 'Increased Life Efficiency** due to the greater vacuum 
space within the Balloon. SAF Silk Frosted f/^; SAC Clear lid. 

For REAR with all TUBA use TRE VITA 6v.04A. 






■ ■ _ * 






\ 



■i*;-:- 









VITA 



REFLECTOR 



ALREADY WELL KNOWN FOR BATTERY LAMPS 

■THIS YEAR INTRODUCED FOR DYNAMO LAMPS 

CYCLE DYNAMO HEAD LAMP BULBS with 15 mm. Double Reflector 

Balloons and M.E.S. Caps 



Ref. 

t *» ¥ 


i Volts. 


Amps. 

.3 


Watts* 


Price | 


751 


4 


1-2 


7\d. 


753 


4.5 


.3 


1-35 


71d. 


759 


6 


.25 


1.5 


71d, 


760 l 


6 


.3 


1,8 


7ld. 


761 


6 


.35 


2.1 


7'd. 


762 


6 


A 


2.4 


7Ad. 


764 


6 


.5 


3 


7*d> 


765 


6 


,55 


3.3 


f id. 


770 


Special Bulb for L 


ucifer 


I 




6V,12-Pole ... 


... 


7\d. \ 



I ■"■ 



— 1 



- 



u-i »# 









rcr 



I 



it's Catalogue now availabl 



n 



CO 



Post 



Single 



Li 



I 



pos 






fc 



(Prop*. : Wartburg 



Ltd.) 



-■• 





PURCHASE IN 

CONFIDENCE 

Whether you are interested in 
locomotive* only or complete 
railway i you can be certain 
that Milbra products will give 
you the sume utterly reliable 
service that is expected of the 
great railway groups in this 
country. Send 6d t for your 
copy of the 100 page catalogue 




OO 



kth 



e same, run w 




entical re 



liability 



an 




a 




built to the same fine standar 







s 



as 




e 




ug 




expresses 



that 



a 

maintain sue 




e 




cien 



t sch 



e 






ules throughout the country 








replicas 




TMHOSCALE 



ovvelii 




MILLS 



BROS 







St. Mary's Road 



* 



Engineers) 
SHEFFIELD 



LTD 



London Showrooms; 






2, Victoria Colonnade, Victoria House, Southampton Row, W.C.I 







*\ 






MECCANO MAGAZINE 



} 

















■ 



aeroplanes are designed and M 

constructed and should be able to recognise the different types 

se fine Constructor Outfits contain a 
range of aeroplane parts by means of which boys are able to design 
and build their own Aeroplanes quite easily. 




h OO Outfit 
wo. O Outfit 




#** 



**» 



*■* 



• ■* 






No. 1 Special Outfit 



of Aeroplane Outfits 

Standard Series 

3'3 I No, 1 Outfit 
4'6 „ | No. 2 Outfit 

Special Series 

13 '6 | No. 2 Special Outfit 



**■ 



*•• 



7'11 

13 '6 



«** 



22'6 



Norc, The parts in the No. OO and So, O Outfits arc not intended /or 

use with the larger Outfits. 






















Now is the time to get a Meccano Motor Car Outfit. You will never 
grow tired of building and running the superb models that you will 
be able to build, Your days will be full of fun and thrills! 

Perfect miniature reproductions of many different types of car 
can be built with these splendid Outfits, and a powerful clockwork 
motor, that gives the models a long run on one winding, is included 
in each Outfit 



Prices of Motor Car Outfits 







. i outfit 



* + . 



■ ■ m 



9'6 



| No. 2 Outfit 



• *• 



#t + 



18'9 




* 

• 



I 



M 




CCANO LIMIT 





BINNS ROAD 



# 



LIV 







OL 



13 



I 

i 



1 









THE 







I* 



* 




i broadcast talk Mr. W\ / 

ah mc fascinating features of tl„ ***• w .-.^„ *„,*, 
can be reproduced tn miniature." 

Let us help you to achieve this peak of the hobby! 

- 



< 



MAGAZINE 



IX 



— 






because it's a 

With thi 









LOWKE model to SCALE ■ 



S 




mous firm 










can 





sure o 




e most 




e 





ui aavice 




a railway-laying track for electric, steam or clockwork 



traction, choosing the right locomotives and rolling stock for it, and 
ddi 



a 



ng 




e 




nishing touches of stations, engine sheds, signals, an 




f 

platrorm accessories. 



You 






can ca 



Hat 




eitner 





eir 




ranches— in London or Manchester 






or write tor 




eir 




u 





escriptive catalogues to Hea 




Offi 



ce at 








orthampton 




ey 




moae 




ave many new models ready for this Christmas not only for 

.1 #11 t ' m m, '» 



and 



m 



railway 

od' 



s 



of all 



gauges, 



but 



o 




stationary engines, 




o 





' 




el ships ot every type. 



EVERYTHING FOR MODELS 



1. MODEL RAILWAYS from gauge "OO 



94 



many 



duct 



- 



price 



reprint just out containing 

A. 17, 6d. post free. 



2. A new booklet on "GAUGE % 0' SCALE MODEL RAILWAYS." Most 



IVG 




luetion, out in November. B 



book a copy. 



G.R.17. 3d 



3. MODEL STATIONARY ENGINES AND PARTS, B17. In two book 



B.I. E 



Boilers and 







B.2. Castings, Materials 
4. MODEL SHIPS AND 



3d. post free 




3d 



P 



. 



free, 



FITTINGS, Th 



range. 



S.17 6d 



5. FREE TRAIN BOOKLETS. FB.17 and TT.17. Free 



Laying Model Permanent 




USEFUL BOOKS 

2d. How to build a Traction Engine, 3d. Waterfine 



Booklet of Ship Sets, Id. How to Sail Your Model Yacht, 4d. 



BASSETT-LOWKE LTD 



London: 112, High Holborn, W.C.I. 



* 



NORTHAMPTON 



Manchester: 28, Corporation Street 




MONTH "KEEP-FIT" GYM OUTFIT 










EQUA 
SUITAB 



COMBINED 






SWING 






INDOO 



OUTDOOR 



TRAPEZE 
AND GYM 

RINGS 



THE MONTH GYM SET 

The set consists of an 8 ft. tubular 






steel stand in green cellulose finish 
swing with rope, trapeze and feather 

covered rings. Price £3.3.0. 



Other popular Montil 
Toys include 'Flying 
Ac*' Coaster Cars, 






There is 






a 



junior set with 
trapeze, leather covered rings. 



swing 



Prfee £2.12.6 



Scooters, Tricycles, 
Kiddy Bikes, Sack 

Trucks, Barrows, Dolls* 
Cots, Push Chairs, 

Folding Desks and 

Stools. 




HE 






.L TD 



BIRMINGHAM 16 







2 



X 




MECCANO MAGAZINE 




THE 



RANGE 



OF 



HORNBY 



Complete Equipment 




or 



COMPLETE MODEL RAILWAYS 

GAUGE O 






commencing 

Rai 










w 





ascinating 
Hobby 



MB Complete Model Railway 






Consists of Locomotive i non-reversing) arid Tender, Track, 
Goods Wagons, and oiher components for an attractive 
small home railway, Packed in carton Price 9 '11 






« 



Hornby 




omplete Model Railway Sets provide 






Aft 9 Complete Model Railway 

The Locomotive and Tender are similat to those in the 
1*18 Set. There are Passenger Coaches in place o( the 
Goods Wagons, more Track and extra components. 

Packed in carton. Price 12 / 6 



the simplest way o 







eginmng 




e 



thrifli 



ng Hornby 



M10 Complete Model Railway 






Railway hobby. Four Sets are available and 





is com 



plete 



in I 



tself; 



ever 



ythi 



ng is there, ready for 



use as soon as you get it home. 



A larger Set, packed rn a special cabinet. A f inn range* 
of components is included in addition to a Locomotive 
(non-reversing). Tender and Coaches, Price 19*9 

Mil Complete Model Railway 






Unpack 




e 




ox 



/ 




en 



ay out 





e rails an 




■ 



accessories as snown in 





e 




put the locomotive 



nd 



ustration provided, 







or wa 





own railway! It's 



This is the best of ih& 
reversing Tank Locomotive 
make the splendid model 
neat cabinet in which the 





Sets It includes a 
and all the accessories to 



the reproduction herewith, 



railway Illustrated below. The 
Set ts packed is shown in 

Price 27'6 





wor 



MECCANO LTD BINNS ROADLIVERPOOL13 



How ejfecti 



- m. 






* 



component of the 
Ml 1 Compter M&dvl 

Railway can 6* laid 
out is shown in this 

illustration. 



< 



special 
cabinet* 










THE MECCANO MAGAZINE 



W 



XI 















Frog 
Scale 

each 



models 
and 

Frog 



fill 



the 



needs 



of everyone interested 



in 




non 



model 



> 



flyin 






a 
fa 






XS 



mg> 

designed by experts 



re a 




mad 



c 




IS 



model aeroplanes 

and in kit form 




m 



its 




READY BUILT MODELS THAT 
REALLY FLY-FROM V- TO 42'- 



FLYING MODEL KITS--YOU CAN 
BUILD AND FLY THESE MODELS 



No toots needed — all parts cut to shape 



FAMOUS FROG 



PENGUIN 



NON-FLYING SCALE MODELS 



t 



I 



I- 




S.W.19 



TRADB "* MARK 

REGD. 



complete with winder box 



UPON Please send me yottr " Frog " coloured 
** ■ v "^ leaflet with particulars of the " Frog " 

Flying Club and how to obtain handsome 

enamelled '* Frog '* Pilot badges* 

To Lines Bros. Lid. (DepL 5), Morden Road* 

London* S*W. 1 9 

NAME .*,**,» »•••»*. .....*.•*••*.•••• + .. •....» *.......,». 

ADDRESS ....„„ *••■■ ...... II 38 







xn 



THE 







.:• 



Fm 



§■ - 



■ i 

PRICES 






PARTS 



ILLUSTRATED 



r v * 



■ * ■ 



* * * 






Perforated Strips, 3jt" 
9b, Angle Girders. 3*~ .. 
fO. Flat Brackets . 

Double Brackets 
12a, Angle Brackets, 1 w x1* 
19a. Wheels, 3* diam., with set 

screws **• *«* «*» ■ *» 

Flanged Wheels. 1 J* diam, 

ft «' * »> 

Pulley Wheels 

6"dia. P with centre boss and 
sec screw 
20a. 2" 

■ »i ?? ft 

I'd fa, with centre boss and 

grub screw 



J doz. 

doz. 



19c. 



• ■ 






m *♦ 



TP 



23a. 



■ ■ . 



* I * 



•'• ■ 



22a, 1" dia. without centre boss 



and grub screw 



Bush Wheels 

Pinion Wheels 






*■** 



**# 



n 



. • • 



■ - • 



dia.. 



26 b. 



'face 

m 

Gear Wheels 
27. 50 teeth, to gear with j" Pinion 

»fcj?3 :: :: ;: £ ; 

Contrate Wheels, 11" diam. 

Bevel Gears, ** t 26 teeth 

Gear Wheels, 1', 38 teeth 
Worms 



** 



Cranked Bent Strips 
Double T , ffl 

Double Angle Strips, ZJ'xl 

Perforated Strips slotted, 

i/ J IV/Mj^ » + * »#* ABA AAA 

Triangular Plates, 1 
21* Curved Strips, 2$ 
radius 



*» 



J doz. 



* 4 4 






*•# 



- * * 



90a, 2|* Curved Strips, cranked. 

If* radius, 4 to circle *., 












■ 








REAL ENGINEERING PARTS 

Meccano parts, many of which are here illustrated, combine to form 
complete miniature engineering system with which practically 
any movement known in mechanics can be correctly reproduced. 
New parts are always being introduced in order to keep Meccano 

model-building in tine with the most modern engineering 



requirements. The greatest care Is taken in the designing of 

these parts to ensure that they function exactly as their 

counterparts in actual engineering practice, Ask your 

dealer for the latest complete illustrated price list* 






MECCANO LTD., Binns Road 

LIVERPOOL 









V 







* 



c 



* * 



PRICES 



PARTS 



ILLUSTRATED (Com.) 

Sprocket Wheels, 56 teeth, 
3" diam ». «•• ,,, each 

Sprocket Wheels! 18 teeth, 
1* diam ,.. ,.. 

ST f 1*1 ^" 

ingle Bent Strips 

Flat Girders, 3|* long 
Architraves 



*- * 



4*1 



. 



.. Idc 



#■ * 



• * • 



* ► * 



»r 



i** 



• * - 



each 



Rack Strips, 34* long 
Girder Frames ... 

Hub Discs, 5§* diam. 
Cone Pulley 

Reversed Angle B rackets, 1*, l doz* 

** 

nnions ... 
Flat Trunnions ... .„ ... 

Rack Segments, 3* diam*..* 
Flywheels, 2f*diam. 
Corner Brackets, 1 V 

Wheel Flanges 

Flanged Brackets (R.H.) ... 
Circular Strips, 7 J* diam. 
overall 



**• 



■ 1* 



!»** 



« . * 



t*i 



m #* 



m ••» 



* * 4 



* *■ - 



Pawls, with Pivot Bote and 
Nuts 

Ratchet Wheels.,, 
Corner Angle Brackets, |* f 
right hand 
154b. Corner Angle Brackets, 1*, 

left hand*,. 



- - - 



. . . 



i doz, 



• • • 



• * 4 



1 «* 



»*• 



v 0) ■ 



»## 



Signal Arms, Home ... 
Channel Bearings* 1 4*x1*x4 

Girder Brackets, 2*x1 -r xJ" 
Geared Roller Bearings ... 
Ball Bearings, 4* diam. 

Eccentrics, i* throw 
Toothed Gear Ring, 3 j-* diam. 

133 external teeth 1 
95 Internal f| J 
Strip Plates, 12^x2** ». 
Curved Plates, 1 ^* radius 

HeUca. Gears rf£f-^ 

14 {togetfje, 



fnders, 2£* long 









I 



*■» # 



V -V ft 



♦. 



■1* 



■ "■ 



147 & 148 






&I54* 






200 



&2II 



♦ * 



»v *\ 



o © o 

1 



'-i-Tv 



,1 



w 



o c o 



* * 



»-t 













MECCANO MAGAZINE 



A 



* I + 



Kill 



NT 



I 



* 



SUPER DETAIL PERMANENT WAY 






PRICES. Standard Gauge "O" Parts 

suitable for Hornby Models 

Steel Rail, sberadised, 

per yd. 2d. t 1/8 doz* yds. 
Brass Rail per yd, 4*d, f 4/3 doz. yds. 
Case Chairs, slide-on fit -,. per 100 1/2 
Electric Raised Chair -. per 100 2/- 

Fishplates ... , ... ... per dox. 3d* 

Sleepers, scained correct colour 

per 100 2/3 
Battens, |-ln. x J-in- section 

per yd, 2Jd, t 2/3 dox. yds. 
Pins* appro*. 1,000 ... 6d. packet 

Track Gauge, special, with eke, chair jig 

9d. each 
All prices plus postage 



Megow 
Balsa Flying 

Kits for 12* wing span Flying 

Models of the AERONCA, 
BOEING P12E. CURTISS 
PURSUIT, HELL DIVER, 

. ___ _.. _ . _ 






i 






- . ■ .- 



LOCKHEED VEGA, MONOCOUPE, PUSS MOTH, STINSON 

RELIANT, TAYLOR CUB, VULTEE VIA, WACO. 

Price 1 Od. Postage 3d. 

Kits for 24" wing span Flying Models of the STINSON RELIANT, 

CUSTOM. MONOCOUPE, CONSOLIDATED P/30, 
FAIRCHILD, HAWKER FIGHTER, CURTISS HAWK, RICHMAN 

MERRILL'S VULTEE. Price 



Endeavour" Yachts 



t ■ 



j i 






These new Yachts are 



fast 



latest thing for 
racing work* All of the hulls are hand made in 
best yellow pine. The two largest Yachts are fitted 
with Braine type automatic steering. Painted 

Pale Blue. Cabin Skylight extra. 

Prices: 



Yacht with 

Yacht with 



automatic 

automatic r 




*.« 



* - + 



Yacht with Braine type steerin 
Yacht with Braine type steering 

Carriage extra. 



§ ■ * 






Steam Engines 









These engines have been completely 

igned throughout to get higher 
speed and more power. The main 
engine standard is now made from a 
hot brass stamping and is complete 
with pipe unions. The cylinder and 
is Cons are machined from solid 

AH 



rass. 



engines are 
targe flywheels 



fitted with 



W252. OSCILLATING MARINE 
ENGINE, Single oscillating type, 
|-ln* Bore, §-m. Stroke, Suits Boats 
18 in. long... ... ... ,.,3/9 

W2S3, OSCILLATING MARINE 

ENGINE, Oscillating Single Acting 
Cylinder. |-in* Bore, J-in. Stroke. 
Suits Boats 24 in. long. Price 5 



YOU WILL SEND 



FOR BOND'S 



PAGE ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE 



YOU WILL FIND MANY OTHER SUGGESTIONS FOR 



• 



CHRISTMAS PRESENT. 



'Phone 
EUSton 5441-2 



BOND'S 






EUSTON ROAD LTD 



357 



Euston Road 



Londo 



N.W.I 



Established 
1887 







r 






MADE THROUGHOUT 



ASK YOUR 

DEALER TO 

SHOW YOU 

THIS 
MODEL 




MODEL S.E.4 

Stationary Steam 

Fitted with two cvlinders ai%d 
geared reduction shaft. Built on 
heavy cast brass frames. Long lubri- 
cated bearings, heavy solid brass 




flywheel., turned brass crankdiscs and 
pulleys. Driving pulley incorporated in 
flywheel. Cylinders lubricated by 
lubricator in steampipe. Solid drawn 
brass tube boiler guaranteed to 100 lbs. 

OTHER MODELS 



pressure, 

domed etuis, safety 
valve f whistle and water 
level plug. Fired by 5-wich 
stint tamp with asbestos wicks* 
Brass loco-type funnel fitted on boiler, to 
which exhausts of engine are led for realism 
as in large practice. Mounted on steel base- 
plate 7i*xfir. drilled at edges to fit 
Meccano: enamelled oil-resisting signal 
red. This is a very powerful mgtne-2,000 
revolutions per minute. Packed t% f\f t* 
in strong plywood box, with M Jf r Q 
tiller funnel and instruct ions .-T* r* ** 

Postage Bo. 

10'-, 14'6 and 21'- 



Designed and 
Manufactured by 






MALINS A.M.I.Mech.E. 



Incorporating G.M. Patents-makers of theG.M.Ballrace Turntable 




MARY'S 




f 



BIRMINGHA 






with 



You can turn leisure hours into pleasure 
hours for all your family and friends* 
8/- DOWN brings immediate delivery 
of a real Riley Billiard Table, not a 
tov, but a perfect replica of a full 

Billiard Table, 7 Days' Free 
Trial given and all carriage cosU 

You pay balance monthly* 






Riley* 1 Cabriole" Model E Riley 
"Gorrtkins* Table, C> ft 
size £M/tGf- cash or 

easy payments* 




'Home 



it 



Billiard 



Table rests easily on an 

ordinary table. Sizes and 









4' 4 



prices are: 
m x2' 4* 



£7 



5'4*x2' 10* £9 



<>' 4* x 3' 4* 

7'4*x3' 10* 
8' 4* X 4' 4* 



£11 15 

£15 
£21 10 



Rileys are Urn tar- ■ ^l makers 

of full-steed billiard tables in 
Great Britain. Also special- 
ists in second-hand tables, 

accessories, repairs, etc 



or in 20 monthly payments 
of 8/-, 10/3, i3/3, 17/-, 

24/6 






RILEY "COMBINE" BILLIARD AND 

DINING TABLES 



I 
I 
I 
I 

I 

! 




32 

BILLIARD 
TABLES 

Write for details 



I 



Perfect furniture for the modern home. Convert to either 



. use in a few moments. Many attractive models, oak or 
mahogany, in sizes for all rooms- Prices of round leg 

mahogany tables are: 

7'4*x3' 10* £33 
S'4*x4'4* £43 



| 5'4*x2' 10* £22 10 
| 6' 4* x 3' 1* £26 10 

I 



or in 13 or 20 monthly payments. 





E. 

or Dept. 









., DEAL WORKS, ACCRINGTON 
147, Aldersgate Street, London E.C.I 



\ 









XIV 





MAGAZINE 










TRI-ANG DAIMLER 




No. 8 



Magniflceni coach-built sports car. Upholstered seat. Tubufar front aale. BALL-BEARING 
" AD AXLE, both full/ sprung. Adjustable pedals Band brake. Facsimile Daimler 

, Adjustable windscreen. Klakfcer 





taoiator. Adjustable windscreen. Kiakker horn, eic. Dunlop 2i in. pneumatic 
tyim on tangent spoke wheels, AM bright parts CHROMIUM PLATED. Length *54 in. 

Price 137/6 







TRI-ANG PREMIER 

All-steel body. Upholstered seat. Latest type Vauxhalt radiator, lamps and bumpers. 
Sin. balloon disc wheels. Jin. rubber tyres BAIL-BEARING BACK AXLE. Windscreen 
and direction indicator. Dummy hood. All bright parts CHROMIUM PLATED Length 39 m 



Price 45'- 




# 




* 









TRI-ANG DAIMLER 








stared seat and back, 




and lamps 



design. Steel body with opening side door 
BALL-BEARING BACK AXLE. Facsimile Daimler 
Latest lype mudguards. 9 in. balloon disc wheels, f in. rubber tyres. All bright parts 
CHROMIUM PLATED, Length 37 in 



Price 





' 



I mc i**ci Mime) 

MOD?! No ?. 



TRI-ANG 



II 



FAIRYCYC 




f 1 






(Regd.) MODEL No. 2 



Tubular frame, 14 in wheels, If in. joinlless sponge tyres. Ball-bearing pedals. *im 
brake Two-coil saddle. Chain cover. Stand. CHROMIUM-PLATED FITTINGS. Black. 

blue °' ™'°* n - Price 39/6 



ENGLAND 



- 



TRI-ANG 







t 



• 



"UNITY 1 BOY'S CYCLE No. 18 PB 

18 in. frame. Finest quality British tube. Wheels 18 in, x tf in. CHROMtUM-PLATED 
rims. Dunlop pneumatic tyres. Roller lever pattern brakes. Spring-seat saddle. 
Jin xjin roller chain. Ball-bearings throughout Complete with equipment and 
finished in black or blue. All usual bright parts CHROMIUM PLATED Ages 7 to 11. 



LINES 



BROS 



LTD. 



■ 



* 



Tri-ang 



Price 63/- 

Works 



Mo r den Rd., Merton, London S.W.19 

■ i 



TRI-ANG TRICYCLE No. 5B {Regd. Trade Mark) 

NOW FITTED WITH BALL-BEARINGS THROUGHOUT AND ROLLER BRAKE 

Cvcle chain drive with free-wheel. Frame best quality weldless cycle tubing 16 in, 
wheels 1i in. joint less sponoe-rubber tyres. Improved handlebars. Rim brake. Coil- 
spring saddle, CHROMIUM-PLATED FITTINGS. Black. blue or maroon. 

Price 59'6 














ASK YOUR DEALER 
TRI-ANG TOY COLOURED LEAFLET 






ENLARGED CHRISTMAS ISSUE. PUBLISHING DATE: 1st 
















9 



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England 




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Vol. XX11L No. 11 

November 1938 




a... ■■ ■ ■ i 

■ ■a iii. ii 

*J-fa | 14^^ 



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"■'■■' -■ 



Id I II I I 




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11 - 





I I PI I I 1 













i 



€ 



i 






Railway Companies Fine Each 




but the ghost could scarcely be blamed for what happened 



The general 




up of Brit is] i railway services 



goes on, although this year has not been such an eventful 
one as 1937, which might fairly be 





m 





long-distance trains 
which have been the 




as a "boom 
rnprovements continue m 

reen Lond on and 








■ 







readers think about 




of renii 




alterations 



I am curious to know what 
it. No doubt many of them 
or could provide* details of other quaint or unusual 

■a .4bh 

things that they have come across, for *M.M." readers 

little of what is to be seen. I should like 








since 









of 

tween London and Glas- 

go w and E d i nb urgh w a s 
abandoned. 

saw the institution of 

high- 



the long-standing agreement limiting 






them to write to tell me of any interesting things of this 
kind that they know, and I will reproduce in the "From 

Our Readers" section of 

■ 

the Magazine the most 



attractive of the stories 







year 











speed services, 

Coronation Scol" of the 



L . M . 




and 



a 











on 



ft 



of 



the 
the 



L.N.E.R., ^eacli consist 

4 

ing of special stock 
each hauled 










a 




by 
st reamlined 



) m o t i ve . 






year 

e been no 

further introductions of 

this kind, but general 

improvements have 

been well maintained. 
It is 

recall that 
Scot" 





Royal 




over 








■ 





[ receive, especially 

those that are illustr 
by means of original 
totographs. 

This reminds me that 
in response to a large 
number of requests I in- 
to commence next 
a new series of 
" Whatever Is It?" photo- 

graphs on this page for 
readers to worry their 
brains over. In each of 
th 





* - 






ese 

puzzles a familiar o 
shown from an unusual 
angle has to be identi- 
fied, and the 
vides consider 







route of a railway that 



How did this happen? The trees in this photograph, taken in the grounds of the Old Rectory at Ruffortl, 
Lancashire, have grown completely round the iron rails, which are now firmly embedded in them. 

: m _». _. _ ._ 






was com 





1 

over 



Photograph by T. C. L. Hutchinson. 



100 years ago, the Nortl 



i 




Wig an and Preston. 



on Railway betwrm 



will be offered each 




amusement. To add a 

little more interest to 
the search a small prize 

in 



to the reader who 





At Parkside Junction the North 



the 




correct solution. 



connected with 










panics there 

fined 



Railway, and 




se of the Liverpool 

'een the two com- 






it 




! arrangement 




every minute by which 



s 




were late! 









A Lancashire Curiosity 
There are many quaint and curious things to be seen in 



pecial Christmas Issue 

Jaaa 



Next month's "MM" wall be 




s 






isMie. 




be fascinating arti 



as usual will be greatly enlarged. There will 

of the kind that have made the 








r azme 



together with all 



so popular with many thousands of readers, 

:ures giving the latest 







ar 



f 




the British countryside, and the illustration on this page 

example. The rails shown are embedde 

4 



is an exce 





completely in the trees, which have grown round them. 

The photograph was taken in the grounds of the 

Old Rectory at Ruflord, Lancashire, which has now 

been demolished. The building was said to be haunted, 



information 



on 




engineering and railway progres 
tricks, and many other attractions 



Puzzles, con 

also will be in< hided, and the issue will be one of the 

best that lias yet appeared. It is sure to be sold out 




readers who wish to make 



have not already placed a 





regular 



do so at once. 






605 






606 



THE 




MAGAZINE 




nnnaDonoannnn 

□ 
□ 

D 

D 

D 







□ 

a 



By Wing Commander G. W* Williamson, O.B.E., M.C, MJnst.C.E., MJLMech.E., MXE.E 




nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnDnnnnnnnnnDDnnDannnnnnnnn 

A PHOTOGRAPH in one of the aeronautical papers 




xVrecentlv showed the cockpit of an aeroplane of nearly 






the indications would be inaccurate unless the governor 

weights were made 



thirty 

* jr 




ago; the dashboard 




only 



a 



si n g f fj 




and for all the other instrument indications 



that pilots nowadays 




upon 



the 




used the 





of his senses. That single instrument was the 
revolution indicator, by which pilots 



or not 




eir 







ne 




in 




r 





principle is exactly the same as that of the speedometer 
of a motor car. The engine drives a shaft in the instru- 
men t on w 




e governor 
means of a 





e and 



is speeded 
seen at the 




overcome this 




engine 
point of 

one on the inside of 
the instrument case, connected in turn to the instrument 
end of the 



t rat ion, which gears into ano 




» 




shaft. 
The next instrument to find a place on the dashboard 




are 











of old-time aircraft was the air speed indicator. In the 

early days, air speed was measured upon a U tube half 

ed with a pink 




fo or more 

governor type weights. 
The greater the speed 

engine -driven 

the 
out 

of 

and 






ghts will fly 
under the action 

centrifugal 




thii 



s 



outward move 










is 




to 




e 







on the face of 
instrument. In a 
steam engine governor, 
the two weights tend 



to 




to tl 




lowest 



point under the action 



of 



gravity; 



but 



in 



. 



revolution indicators 



weig, 



Ms 



a re re- 



the 

turned to the inmost 

position by means of 

a spiral spring at 

of the cover nor 





system. , 








iere 




wing of the 
aircraft there was and 
is a device styled the 
Pi tot head. It consists 
two tubes pointing 
into the line of flight; 

n so that 






can 



one is 

the w 

straight 

the other dosed so 

within it 




blow 

it, and 








standin 

of the 

U tube was connected 
to ""one of. these two 

tubes; and it will be 

clear that the wind 



blowin 



g 




the 





the 
res 



would depress 





in 



the 



cor 











ut ion indi 



cator 

of weights 
angles to 



tube to an extent 
depending on the 

The dashboard of the de Havilland M Leopard Moth." On the upper row from left to right are the air log, cnppd of \\\nh t A <ira1p 
Reid two needle gyro turn indicator, liquid fore and aft level and watch. On the lower row there are the oil a^-^u. wi iu^ j 1 l. s\ »v,aic 

__ _ ■ ■ j_# i if ■ -i+-i+ a, ■ ii vlm ■ - ■ . . . - 



tWO pairs pressure gauge, eng 





righ t 



indicator, air speed indicator and altimeter. In the recess at the bottom of miles per 



is the magnetic compass. 





IS 








m 



When the 




illustration 



running at a 



.. 




marked against 




on the opposite 

speed corresponding to engine revolutions of more than 

600 per minute, the weights fly outward in a movement 



er leg, and the higher the speed the higher the liquid 



similar to the 




of a pair of scissors. This move 



stood in the tube. 



e same 



except that we have 







head is 








ment is transmitted to a sliding collar of fibre, above 



the weights, and in that collar are 



by 





two lingers 



water fillin 

within it. 




and 



a 




that 



to-day, 
as a winding for 

prevent rain 




open tube, or insects from nestin 






movement upward or downward is 



transmitted by pulley 

fixed, 




to the shaft 




the pointer is 

instrument is on the dashboard, the 

weights i 



corner. 








b 

An 



s almost horizontal. 



carrying 




expensive 




of the revolution indicator s 




;m 



is the flexible shaft connecting the indicating instrument 
with the engine. It will be obvious that the 




s 



thi 

■ 

shaft runs the shorter will be its life, owing to the more 

it is connected 



ra 




wear. 





engine end, 




to a gear-box that reduces the speed of the shaft to one 



quarter 




of the 





the governor shaft in the 



indicator were to run at only that low speed, however 



• 




e indicating instrument nowadays is of the capsule 

type; the same principle is used in the altimeter, a sample 
of which is 




gated 



aluminium 



box, 



The capsule consists of a corru- 



which expands or contracts 



according 




the pressure on its walls. An increase of 




will cause the wall- 



of pressure 









m, 




a 










the box would permit the walls to 
provided that there was some external influence 

*- - - 

to encourage them to do so. This is provided by a power- 









pring m the shape < 





letter U, seen in front 




the cor rug 




capsule in the illustration 






Suppose now that the pressure side of the Pitot head 
is connected to the interior of the capsule, and the static 



e 



* 



r 



THE 





607 



side to the airtight case of the instrument; the capsule 

distended to an increasing extent as the speed 




will 

rises. This movement will be assisted by the spring, and 
the 




tension of the capsule is transferred by a 




S 




The soul of a pressure gauge is the so called Bourdon 
. This consists of a flat tube bent into the arc of a 




at one 



circle. 

pressure at the o 




and conn 




to a source of 






■ 











connecting rod to a rocker shaft seen 
at the top of the instrument. From 
that shaft a rod projects, which is 
connected by a 




chai n 




a 







on 




shaft of which the 
instrument pointer is fixed. These 

are clearly visible in the 
illustration. 








is 




dial of the air speed indicator 

in miles per hour; the 
altimeter dial in the illustration is 

graduated in thousands of feet. The 

can be applied to both 




s 




instruments, 

it is airtight 



exhausted 




altimeter 





x w 




air. At ground level 
normally be 




the 

flat by the air pressure were it not 
that it is already held open against 




an oil pressure gauge there is 
a pointer that moves over the dial 

nations. Behind is 

movement, 

e in different 



carrying the 






vanes in 





. In each the sealed end 

of the Bourdon is connected by a 



linkage to a 




a little wheel mounted 
same shaft as 

the 



gearing into 





on the 

In each, 




end of the Bourdon is 



sealed into a 
a tube to which 
can be joined. 




connected to 

pipe 



res sure 



pres 




ose now that the instrument 
is standing at zero with no pressure 
inside it; any increase of 
will make the 





out, and this movement 



the air pressure by the same type 
of U shaped spring. 

S time the instrument Case is The movement of a revolution indicator with four weights, 



straighten 

is transmitted through the linka 





quadrant, and g 
pointer. 




wheel to the 







airtight, but is connected to the 



The natural spring 



left 



* 

m 




The drive is transmitted through the gear wheel at the base, g rd(m t ^ h it was firgt buflt 



outer atmosphere. If now the aeroplane were to ascend 



to 10,000 ft., 





air would be very much less dense, and 
walls of the capsule greatly reduced 




pressure on 
The effort of the spring is now balanced by less pressure, 

and the capsule is again expanded, this time bv reducing 

the 



up will 




i to bring it back to the zero position. There 




pressure on the outside instead of 
pressure on the inside. By exactly the 





is bound to be a small amount of play in the gear wheel, 

and linkage, however, and this play is taken 
up, and the instrument pointer returned to zero at the 

its normal 
g on the pointer 



same time as the Bourdon 
position, by means of a small s 

In 




same mechanism 







expansion is 



transmitted to the pointer. 

The altimeter capsule is exactly of 

Mr jj 

1 

>meter. 






as 




in a 





and it will follow that it will 

or contract as the barometric pressure 

falls or rises. An aeroplane put into 

1 L 






i 



its hangar at night may 

its altimeter showing zero or ground 




there is a change in the 

pilot may return in the 




some 






morning to 

200 ft, indicated. 

weather changes, 
rotate the dial in relation 
pointer by means of a 
gear wheel let into a recess seen 




me 








below 








est point of 



the dial. The little wheel is operated 




a 








to the instru 



■ 




ment case, and gears into the 

around the edge of the dial in 




illustration. 

The old type altimeters were gradu- 
ated only up to 10,000 ft., 







s was 




ost the 




of 




spring is 





____ 



of the 




while in the lamer movement it is 
visible on the face side of the instru- 
ment. 

On the dashboard illustrated there 



is a liquid fore-and-aft level that will 



indicate angles of 




in 




> or glide up to 

It con- 

half 




triangular glass 

filled with liquid, one side of which 

appears on the face of the dashboard. 








aircrE 




is m 



the 




position the liquid will be exactly half 



way up that side of the triangle. If the 
aeroplane is put into a climb, the liquid 

will run into the vertical side, and 
stand higher in the tube; while if a 
gliding attitude is adopted, the liquid 

will run awav from the vertical tube 

in the dashboard, and will stand at a 
lower level, being practically off the 
scale when a glide of 20 degrees is be- 



• 






climb of even military aircraft. Nowa- 
days any light aircraft can exceed that 



A capsule instrument. This is an altimeter, and the 
corrugated aluminium capsule is at the back, with a 

dark spring of U shape holding it open. 



It Is not difficult to 

a liquid level that would show angles 
of dive as steep as 90 degrees, and one 
or two of these have been experiment- 
but as pilots generally 
interested in the exact 




are not 




height 



» 



and it is necessary either to close up the 










or to permit the needle to begin upon a second round 




■ . ■ 



r 10,000 ft. has 




indi 



ca 



ted 



Another aeroplane instrument is similar to its brothers 



used on 




dashboards of 







?* • 



the 



principle of the pressure gauge, whatever its purpose, is 
the same in aviation as in other branches of engineering. 



angle of descent or climb when these are extremely steep, 

20 degrees fore-and-aft level retains its popularity 




and is used on 




aircraft in thousands. 




instruments that involve 





i 



pur 







are 




to 



of liquid 



s 



for 



gravi 




errors 



although this disadvantage may be turned into an ad- 
vantage, as in a ball bank indicator, [Continued on page 66% 

• m 



608 



THE 




MAGAZINE 



nnnnannnnannnnnnnnnannDDDnDann 

a 

D 

□ 

D 














for 






a 
nannnnannnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnn 




nnnnnnDannna 

LJ 

a 

a 

a 

D 
D 

a 
□ 

DDnnnnn 





n 






Tw 




ay Limited" of the New York 






Central Railroad, which is shown on our cover, is one 
of the most famous ol the world's great trains. It has run 
between New York and Chicago since June 1902. In its 





. 



e 



rolling stock 



1 




- 




in appearance 

pre- 



early clays it covered the distance of 960 miles between 
the two cities in 20 hours, its average speed bein 







49 m.p.h. It was then said that the experiment of running 



a train over 






a long distance at this high s 

as neither the rolling stock nor the 
able to stand up to the treatment they 
wouhl receive, but the train was immediately 

mm 



not be 

Mm ■ 

tr 





these endues are is shown in our cover illustration 

from a photograph kindlv su 

IB ^H 





by the New 
c Central System— and from the photograph on this 



page. They have the sheet metal 




or apron that is a 



popular fitting on 

up to 



this rises 
characteristic hn in w 



American streamlined locomotives, and 
a bulbous boiler front on which is a 





i the headlight is centred. The 

i 1 




and 




rew more 




more po 




ar. 



To begin with there were only five coaches, carrying 2 

passengers, but the 

train soon 



/ 



cylinders, wheels and motion are all exposed; there is no 



mystery about these parts 





engine, for utility has 



m 




c 






The c 




of 







is not visible extern; 



working parts inadvisable. 

but is 





a i n 







grew to 





i 



enormous 
sions, and on 
days had to be run 

New 



in 




i o n s 




and more 

rolling stock has 

been introduced 
from time to time, 
more powerful 

giries have been de- 



Slgl 



within a trough-shaped casing running the length of the 

boiler top. Smoke 

deflection is provid- 
ed for by means of 

louvred 

the front end of this 

casing; these open- 
ings can be seen in 

illustration on 





to haul it, 



and 

t i m 



the 



journey 



e 



has been re- 
















un 




step by step 

to-clay the 



"Twentieth 
Limited" takes onlv 






r its long 



IB hr 

journey. Every day 
sections leave New 
York in the east 








s 



*■!"* 



The 




ar 



range men t of the 
engine is the 4-<S-4 
or "Hudson** 




e 




i n t o 








The .streamlined "Twentieth Century Limileu" on its 16-hour run between New York and Chicago. The train is 
headed by one of the streamlined "Hudson' * locomotives described on (his page. Photograph by courtesy of the 

New York Central System. 



United States by 
the New York Cen- 

in 1927. Since 

that time engines of 

t his type hat v e given 
splendid service on 

and 
line 




o 






mam 
The> 



are 



a i i « 




neago in. the west in the evening, and run through 




the night over the water-level route of the 

the shores of the Great Lakes and the banks 

Hudson River, reaching their destinations at 

- - -'CI? 

time on the following morning. 

uction to 16 hrs. for the time between 
York and Chicago was made in June of this year, 
streamlined locomotive ******* *«'i ■*•*» **«*&*€ 
introduced. 









when 



Altogether 




new 

and 10 




w 




simple in general design and robust in construction, as is 
characteristic of most American locomotive types, 
cylinders onlv are fitted, but these in conjunction with the 
vast boiler provide sufficient power for the haulage of 

otives 

have aluminium-finished driving wheels. The iin already 

" is of aluminium with a special satin finish. 

are made up of 



heaviest and the fastest expresses. The 





one 







The new "Twentieth 




1 1 ry 











the operation between the two 





ocomotives were built for this purpose in order to allow 

of four sec- 

tions. From front to rear each complete train appears like 

a smooth, 
month of 




metallic tube on w 




s. 







• 



nu 



was 





there was a 
of passengers travelling by it, 
iown by onlookers 





n its first 
increase in the 

interest 
thousands 






motorists made special trips to crossings to see it speed by 

at 80 m.p.h., and in the cities through which it 

seeing the "Century" go by is a recognised diversion. 

Between New York and Harmon, a run of 46 min., the 

mm mM 

train is hauled by an electric locomotive, for steam loco- 
motives do not work into New York City. For the rest of 



from 13 to 16 coaches of weights varying from 57 to 67 h 
tons empty. All the undernames, sides, ends and 




of 

the new' vehicles are of "Cor-Ten" steel, assembled as far 



as possible by welding. This form of construction, toget 
with the use of al uminium alloy for various parts, gives the 
new coaches a weight of little more than two-thirds of that 
of the older all-steel stock previously used. 

There are no open berths in the sleeping coaches, where 



the accom 







t* 



of w 

bedrooms, compartments 



are 





vn as 




rooms. The "roomettes" are private sitting rooms by day 
and bedrooms bv night, with every modern comfort for 

rife/ *-J w 

the 




is provided 

^ ... 







the journey, between Harmon and Chicago, the most 

of steam locomotives are employed; sleek grey 





tJieir occupants, a greater novelty is proviueu oy un 
duplex compartments, an ingenious "upstairs and down 



stairs" arrangement of rooms on two levels, in each of 
which is a sofa that becomes a bed by night. The dining 



giants, streamlined and finished generally to match 



cars also are s 





luxurious 



.• 



* 






. 



c 



• 



t 



r 



THE MECCANO MAGAZINE 



609 



DnnnDannnnnnnnnnnnnanDnnnnannnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnDnnnnnnnnnaannnnnnnn 



D 

□ 
□ 







How 



D 

r 
a 



a 







* 





World 



on 



Glass 




By K. J. Schaub 



□ 
□ 
□ 

D 
□ 

a 

a 

D 

r 

D 







W 7 H ETH ER 



in 



London, 



Ne\\ 



m. 



Y 









Ml 



W Bombay or Berlin, few people rotating a globe on 



to the pr 
this work 




This sounds very simple, but to watch 




to get 



their desks, seeking: some 












s 




on 



coloured sphere 
notion 




icre 




a different impression of the 

cultieU involved. It is a 






comes from. 

In Lichterfelde, a suburb 
Berlin, there is a factory 
produces geogra 
globes for the whole world, 
with the 5,000 names on 









1. 



i ran slated 



into 







I 



different 





it is a 

■ 

, laborious process from 
the first dab of paint to the 
finishing touch. 



or 






Kamous 

f ing 





are 




examining and noting even 



change undergone by 
Mother Earth. Here a town 
has been ren 







question of accurately fit tin 

frontier to frontier, river to 

river and degree to degree. 

Not a crease must be made, 

>e even 

a fraction of an inch too 
narrow or too wide, for with 

this would 









12 



cause too 




e an error* 




in the end the last piece of 

map would not meet its 



neig 




or would over 







i 



them. 



Eventually each globe is 



set up on its North-South 

Pole axis, and the many- 



coloured sphere is 





in 





re 



near the South Pole new 
land has been discovered; here again an important canal 
has been cut, and there new frontiers have to be taken 
into account. 

Political events can alter the whole cartographical face 
of the earth in a night. A short time 
ago, for instance, Manchukuo in Asia 
was made an independent state and 
had to be given a national colour of its 
own on the map, Ethiopia, as part of 



Cluing a map section on a glass globe. There are 12 sections to each globe, and they 

illuminated by an electric lamp placed Inside it. 




, 




oil 




its tinal make-up. The glebes 

are next washed in warm 
water, coated with ordinary 

and finally 
then 




)h 



e 



iter. 





painted all over 

to begin their journey across the world. 
Two new inventions have recently taken their place in 





One is the extremely 




so-called 



light 




In this case the globe is not 



the Italian Empire, had to be re- 
coloured in the same hue as Italy, and 

portray 



forthcoming! 

IT 1 




1 







Austria in the same colour 
manv. The recent frontier changes in 
Czecho-Slovakia also will be shown in 
due course by the globe maker 



One of the most essential founda- 



tions of globe 




has long 



been the sub-division of the map of the 



world into 12 

ellipse-sha 

in 24 





segments, 

of 











are 
of 



and these when put together 
will form the multi-coloured 



surface of the globe. 

The globes have diameters varying 
from 5 in. to about 3 ft. Bin. 

consists of papier mache 




core 




the 




models and of 




iron in 



and 




made of cardboard or 




milium, but 



of glass, and it is lit from within by 
means of an electric light bulb. The 
internal lighting 





map par- 




ticularly clear and colourful. 
The second invention is the 
Globe/' This is a masterpiece of work- 
manship, wit h a diameter of over 3 







Nearly three years of scientific work 
were required in order to reproduce 
the Earth in tins size for the first time. 

of the world 




impressive 





political con- 
figuration, but also the river and 
mountain systems. There is also the 
whole traffic network of the world, in- 
steam ship 

lines, railway lines and air routes, 

finally all trie large radio stations are 




caravan 







ore 



this 



W 1 J 1 j 1 1 J. _L 

marksdeserts and the limits of 
When the idea of constructing «= 




also 
ice. 




a mighty globe was 
manufacturers 




mooted the 



m * rid 

aluminium m the 












a 




typr 



ones. The 





is shaped into hemi- 



Fitting two of the 12 map sections together. The grea 

accuracy is necessary in this work. 




spheres by means of 







pressure, 




these are 



t 



time whether it would be possible to 

To-day so many 




a 




afterw 





together to 




the complete globe. 

Next begins the deft work of expert gluing girls. The 12 
map sectors are carefully cut out and glued in succession 



orders have been received from all over the world that the 
firm does not know which to supply first. Not onlv 

I Mm V * 

political organisations, but also 

uany private individuals have purchased these globes. 






i 









610 



THE MECCANO MAGAZINE 





♦ 



Steam-Raising 




Super 




By a Railway 




meer 








art ure 



A LITTLE thrill goes through the group of onlookers as dep 
time comes. Then — "Right A way!*' — the driver gives a sharp tug 
at a slender-looking rod; there is a hiss as the sanding valves open, 
a first explosive burst of the exhaust, and they are off. Fascinating, 
is it not? The steam locomotive is the embodiment of power. 



nnDnnnnnDnnnnnDnnDDDDDDnD 

under two inches in diameter inside. The outside of every flue tube 
is m direct contact with the water. Steel is an excellent conductor 
of heat, and as the tubes are only -jfe- in. thick the intense heat of the 
flue gases rushing through inside is very easily transferred to the 




if, just as it is getting under way, there comes a slip, the 
wheels spin round, and with a thunderous roar, a great column of 
exhaust steam goes high in the air. In spite of its fascination, 
however, the steam locomotive remains one of the least understood 



water. The outside surface area of the tube is accordingly termed 





machines, and at the Editor's request I have prepared a couple 
of articles which, it is hoped, will make clear 
the principles on which it works. 

The upper illustration on the opposite page 

shows a longitudinal section through the 
boiler and 



fire- 




of a typical locomotive. 
Considering first of all the fire-box end, it is 
perhaps not generally realised that what is 
externally visible is not the actual fire-box but 
only an outer shell. The fire-box proper, which 



on British locomotives is usu 



i 




made of 



copper, is surrounded, except on the under- 
side, by a jacket of water; this not only pro- 
duces extremely rapid boiling of the water, but 
also prevents the fire-box walls from getting 



every 



.unduly hot. The locomotive fire-box has got 
o burn coal at a tremendous rate. Imagine 
burning two hundredweight of coal 
hour on a space as big as an ordinary house 
hold grate, and you have some idea of the rate 
of combustion in the engine of a fast express! 
To burn coal at this rate it is of course 




essential to have an ample supply of air. As 
will be seen from the diagram, this air is pro- 
vided from two sources; one is through the 

front damper into the ashpan, and so u 
tlirough the fire-bars, and t)ie other throug 
the fire-box door. A large grate helps in the 
burning of the coal, for the fire can be spread 

more thinly over the surface, and the air can 
pass up from the ashpan more freely. The 
speed of the engine would naturally cause air 
to pass through the dampers and the ashpan. 
but a very powerful system of forced draught 



is in action all the time the regulator is open. 

The exhaust steam, 



shooting through the 





smoke-box to the chimney creates a 
vacuum in the smoke-box, and this produces a 

w 4 



powerful 
front end 



draught 



fro 



m the fire-box to the 




the time the cylinders are 








t In the fire-box itself this strong current of 
air has to be carefully directed to provide the 

air just where it is wanted, so that complete 



burning of the fuel takes place over the whole 




ing surface 

The more tubes there are the more readily will the water be boiled, 
though there comes a point in any locomotive design where the 
crowding of more tubes into the boiler in order to obtain more 
heating surface will defeat its own object, by offering too restricted 

The steaming 



a 



for the flue 

a boiler depends almost 







passage 

ability of 

upon the draught. It is easier to maintain a 

draught through a 
small number of large tubes than through a 

great number of small ones, and although the 

surface of the two boilers may be 
exactly the same the one with the larger 





will steam much more freely. 



© 



A very striking illustration of this point is 



afforded by the « >nginal L.N.W.R 

4-6-Os, 



It 





C km glit on" 



structed 



k 



the t J iree -cylinder recon- 
Claughtons" of the modern L.M.S. 



« i 



Patriot" class. The 





original 



class had 149 






internal diameter of which was 
1,667 in., and, as an old driver once expressed 
it to me. the engines were often -s&kv to 



me. 

steam." In the rebuilds the number of tubes is 
reduced to 140, and the internal diameter is 
increased to 1 .917 in. It is of course well known 
that the "Patriots" are wonderfully free- 
steaming engines. 

steam that collects at the top of a 

locomotive boiler is termed "saturated 
•team." The vapour rising from the surface of 
he boiling water carries with it innumerable 
particles of moisture, and although the 
pressure may gradually be built up to, say, 





2(10 lb. 




per sq. 
. In 



in 





i . 






wet 



i r 



it is 
steam . M a d ern p racti ce 



the steam still remains 

called 

fa 

is 




universally in favour of using steam that is not 
merely dry, but is heated above its natural 
temperature of formation. After the steam has 



collected at the top of the boiler, either in the 

- mm. jl. ^^_ 



dome or in the 





es, it is led back into 

superheated, that is 



pipe 







on certain 
boiler to be 

above the tern- 
at which the water natural lv boils. 




J should ex 





n here that 







u 




rr 






area of the 





air- 




mtering 



through the front damper, and thence up 



Diagram showing the principle of operation of the 

injector. A represents the steam inlet, B the entry of 
the water supply and C the delivery outlet. The other 

opening, unlettered, is the 






through the ashpan, is directed by means of an arch 
firebricks, which spans the full width of the fire-box. The directions 
imparted to the air-streams by this brick arch are shown in the 
sectional diagram. On reaching the backward end of the arch the air 



is swept round by the draught from the smoke-box and joins the 

direct stream from the fire-box door. A further studv of the diagram 

shows another valuable function of the brick arch; it draws all the 
air-streams together so that they impinge upon the tube svstem 
exactly at right-angles to the tube-plate. Thus there is a minimum 

of resistance at entry. 

This brings me to the boiler proper. It is often thought that steam 
locomotives are fitted with a water-tube boiler; this is not the case. 
The water is contained in the cylindrical drum, and it is the hot 

f hot air* and fumes from the fire that pass tlirough the tubes. 

a verv lan*e 





In a locomotive boiler the tubes act as flues, There 
number of these tubes; on the standard non-streamlined "Super- 
Pacifies" of the L.N.E.R. for example, there are 121 tubes, each just 



leric conditions water boils at 212 

ees F., when it is boiled under pressure, as 

locomotive boiler, the temperature at 

which boiling takes place is much 

at 200 lb. per sq. in. water does 

until 380 degrees F. is reached. 

The steam is carried through a series of special tubes, and to 





accommodate these a re -arrangement of the Hues is necessary 
the case of the L.N.E.R. non -streamlined "Super-Pacifies" 



. 



In 

there 

are, in addition to the 121 small flue tubes previously mentioned, 
43 large tubes, and these contain the superheater tubes, or elements 
as thev are called. Saturated steam enters a tube at the front end 



of the supei 

# * 




tng svstem 



shows, right back to the fire-box end of the 



it is then conducted, as the diagram 




and then to the 



front again. In the process the steam is made hotter and hotter 



until it finally emerges at a temperature of about 700 degrees F. 
As just explained, the temperature of saturated steam under a 
pressure of 200 lb. per sq. in. is only 380 degrees F., so 
degree of superheating attained is quite large. The steam is then 
absolutely dry — a searing, scorching gas, which, unless the greatest 





care is taken with the lubrication sys 




will play havoc with 



cylinders and valves. Saturated steam is far easier to deal with in 
this respect, for the moisture in it acts as a natural lubricant. 



* 



# 



* 






' 



* 



< 



Q 




Sectional view of a locomotive bofler and fire-box. The numbers indicate different parts as follows: 1. Inner fire-box, 2. Front damper, 3. Ashpan, 4. Fire-bars, 

5. Fire-box door, 6. Smoke-box, 7. Brick arch, 8. Small tubes, 9. Dome (inner), 10. Large tubes, II. Superheater ' elements. 



i i 



In view of this considerable disadvantage, it may well be asked 
Why use superheated steam at all?" Another point that is not 



generally 






weight to the question; superheated 
steam at, say 200 lb. per sq. in., however much hotter and drier 



it 



is, can 




no more 




on the pistons than saturated steam 



at the same pressure. The great advantage of superheated steam, 
and one that far outweighs any difficulties experienced in the 
mechanical working of the locomotive, lies in the greater volume 
of steam obtained from the same amount of coal. Supposing a 






-^F- i Ti— jrr £ -— — , ^ . 

cubic foot of saturated steam at 175 lb. per sq. in. is superheated 
to 670 degrees F.; the pressure is kept constant, as in a locomotive 
boiler, and in consequence the steam expands under the additional 

heat, just as would 
steel. That cubic foot 

saturated st e a m 

d become no 




r 





ten 












as for example during the 
time of standing at a station. It was a Frenchman, Henri Giffard, 
who made the wonderful invention of the injector. The diagram on 
the previous page illustrates the principle upon which the injector 
works. The pipe A is connected to a steam supply, which can be 

the footplate; the pipe B is in direct communi- 



controlled from 

cation with the water tanks. When steam is turned on through pipe 
A its passage through the gap where the water pipe joins in creates 
a partial vacuum and sucks water through the pipe B. The steam 
then continues through the narrowing cone and, as in the nozzle 
of a turbine, greatly increases its speed of flow. But it is now 
thoroughly mixed with cold water sucked in from the tender tank. 






This 



mixing 



causes 





les 






feet 




H cubic 
superheated 

steam. This means 

that to produce the 

of 
two- 



volume 







■ 

sa m e 

steam 

thirds of the amount 

of water used in a 

saturated 

needs to be boiled, 

and of course less 

coal needs to be 



engine 







It would thus seem 

- 



that by superheat- 




one 



gets 



some - 



for nothing; 

actually of course 

some of the heat 

from the flue gases, 
which would other- 
wise have heen used 



for eva 




:ion of 











the steam to con- 
dense, and the jet 

ges into one of 
hot water travelling 
at high speed 

delivery pipe at 

C. The power of this 
jet is great enough to 
lift the n on -return, 

or "clack" valve and 
force a steady stream 
of hot water into the 
boiler against the 

normal working 
pressure. 

Almost all modern 
locomotives are fitted 

with two injectors, 
one using live steam 
and the other putting 
some of the exhaust 




to very good 
purpose. The exhaust 




is one 




Off to the South! A Gresley "Pacific" locomotive makes the first few puffs of its journey and forms an impressive 

sight as it leaves Waverley Station, Edinburgh. 



the water is used in 
heating the 
that is passing to 
fro through the 
superheater elements. This amount of heat has been found to be 
practically negligible in proportion to the greatly increased volume 
of steam obtained. The superheating elements are of necessity 
placed along the middle of the flue tubes, and here of course the 
hot flue gases are of little or no value for heating the water; it is the 
gas immediately in contact with the flue tube walls that provides 
most of the heating. So what would otherwise be waste heat is 
utilised for superheating, and this of course is the secret of the 

great increase in efficiency. 

A point that will probably have occurred to readers by this time 
is "How is the boiler kept full of water?" On the earliest locomotives 
a simple pump was used, driven off the crosshead; and that method 
had, of course, the serious drawback that replenishment of the 



most ingenious 
appliances ever in- 
vented. Not only does 
it make use of what 

b 



would 





for feeding 




e 

waste steam from the 

the boiler, but it also acts as a feed water 

heater. Working on a steam pressure of no more than 151b. per 

in, one of these marvellous injectors can feed water into the 
boilnr against a pressure of 240 lb. per sq. in,: not only this, the 
water enters the boiler at nearly 200 degrees F. At such a pressure 
the boiling point of water is 390 degrees F 

of the exhaust steam injector the water is half-way to boiling 
point before it even enters "the " " " ~ " 
is usual to keep the exhaust steam injector on all the time, and 
to use the live steam injector as a reserve of power when the 
engine is working especially hard and the water in the boiler is 
being evaporated very rapidly. 




so that by means 

alf-way to boiling 

On fast express runs it 



(To be continued) 



612 



THE MECCANO MAGAZINE 




REALISTIC "TABLE-TOP" SCENES 



"TOR many amateur photographers the end of 
.[summer time marks the close of the season's 
activities, and they are apt to put their cameras aside until spring 
returns. There is no reason why they should do this, however, for 
there are many 



inexpensive substitute 



cen 




any optician. 

r over the camera 




r 



holder 
and a trial or two will show the 



best distance at which to place the camera. 



An essential re 




pleasant ways m 
which photography 

can be carried on 

indoors, even if one 
possesses only a 

simple box or folding 
camera. For 
example, in 

month's "MM." we 
dealt with the mak- 
ing of "trick" photo- 
graphs indoors, and 

this month we are 
giving some sugges- 
tions concerning 
another very fascin- 
ating branch of in 
door wo 

"table-top 1 * 
graphy. 









quirement for most 

table-top scenes is a 





s ho u Id 



In 





about 3 ft. long and 
2 ft. wide. A card- 

round 
of the same size also 
will be necessary, 
ror pictures of in- 
teriors the 

may 
piece of buif- 

coloured cardboard 
on which is drawn or 







A realistic "table-top" photograph produced with Dinky Toys ships, a sheet of glass and a simple oacKgrounti. it snuws 

the Italian liner -Rex" outward bound, passing the P. and O. liner '«— *-'«• " 



Strathaird 



a simple 
representing 
the wall of a room. 
For outdoor scenes a 






"Table- topping" is simply the assembly and photographing of 
made-up scenes in miniature* usually arranged on a table, and those 
who have not yet tried their skill in this work can have little idea 
what interest and pleasure it can bring. All the operations involved 
are so simple that even a beginner in photo 
satisfactory results, while 
workers will find plenty to 

them in planning 



on the 






am 



other hand more 



ad vanced 



and hills on it is the most suitable. The stage or baseboard should be 

rear is a little higher than the front. 



tilted sli 




so 





The most important point to remember in arranging a scene 



is 



that all the models and component 




s must be in keeping with 






unusual settings 

ing effects, and incidentally 

will add to their knowledge 



the general scale of the scene. The whole effect will be spoiled if the 
resulting photograph shows, for instance, a man twice the size of a 

horse, or standing in front 
of a house that is obviously 
too sin all for him to enter! 



of 




graphic 




generally. 

The best type of camera 

for this work is one fitted 
with a 

Accurate focussin 





■ - 




and 



is very 



wi 



ith 



a 




e 





important, 

camera of this 

photographer is not only 
able to ensure that 

ure is sharp, but also 
can study the general ar- 

ment of the scene 
with greater ease than in the 
view finder of a non- focus* 




ra n ge 



i the 




nig 



sing camera o 

film or box type. In order to 

ensure a good -sized picture 




It i< 
this 




go astray on 

and attention 



given to securing good pro 



P< 



t 



rtion between the various 



parts of the picture will be 
amply repaid in the greater 
realism of 
pic t ure 



the 



finished 



One of t he 




dim 



culties of table-top photo- 
graphy in the past has been 
that of obtaining model 



animals, motor cars 




a ntl 



small enough to 



keeping with the 

of a scene. 
Since the introduction of 
Meccano Dinkv Toys, how- 



A halt at a iicstrl oasis. Table-top scenes of this kind are quite easy to arrange, and the manner in 

ohotoiiraDh was produced is fully explained in the accompanyi 



which the photograph 






ng article. 



ever, 



t 







difficulty 



no 






longer exists. 




that covers the 




or film, it is essential that the camera 







be brought near the subject. There will be no difficulty about this 
with a camera fitted with double extension bellows, but with a box 
camera, or some other type of non-focussing camera, a supple- 
lens or "portrait attachment" must be fitted to the 
ordinary camera lens. These attachments bring objects at 
range into sharp focus, and are readily obtained at smaU cost. 




esc splendid 

in such a wide variety of subjects, 

and are so realistic in detail that they supply at once the needs 

- — - - j • _ & a ^ a-^L i 



little miniatures are av 





of most table-top photographs. The Dinky Toys motor cars and 
wagons lend themselves perfectly to the production of realistic 
road scenes; the trains provide material for railway photographs, 
and the liners and war vessels make it possible to produce harbour 



and coastal scenes in great detail. The 




planes too, 







•i 



* 



ft 






t 



f 



t 




MECCANO MAGAZINE 






613 




uce rem 





flying scenes. 



- -— ■ 



most important features in 



succe* 




table-top photographs is good lighting 



ensuring 
This requires careful 
arrangement, and conditions vary so much that only a few hints 
can be given here. If a scene is to be photographed indoors by 
daylight, the stage or table on which the scene is arranged should 
be placed close to a window in such a position that the light 
comes from the side 
and slightly in front. 



the ships in different positions in ord« r to secure the best com- 

the finished picture. Many different 



position and 
effects can also be 






ained by altering the positions of the lights 
and if an exposure much shorter than that required to produce 
a normal negative is given, t 





other kind of ta 




-top 




istic 
loto 



night 



effects are secured. 





provides plenty 



of scope for pleasant experiments is that of making silhouettes 

of the kind shown in 






When 



using 



artificial 






light, it is best to place 
the staee almost directly 



under a top light, such 

globe, 



as a 



60 -watt 



and to have a second 






and rather more powerful 

to one side and 



Hght 






slightly in front of the 
scene, in order to avoid 
flat and uninteresting 

lighting. A table 



IS 



suitable 



for 




illumination, and a 





provide a useful 

for future 



d iff er- 

will 

uide 




It 



is 




give definite instructions 
in regard to the length 
of exposure required, as 
this will vary 

to the 

tions and 

film or plate used. Day- 






the lower i 




this 



page 



on 
Silhouettes 



such as these are ad- 
mirable for use in mak- 
nig one's own photo- 
graphic Christmas cards 

and calendars and for 



Passe-partout moun 
and they are very easily 




] >repa red . 



The 



only 



materia Is required are 

a piece of clear white 



glass 



or 



a 




sea 




picture frame about 12 in 




10 in 



* 



w 




a sheet of 
tissue paper of 
the same dimensions, a 
small pair 

and 

one or two umvan 

and unmounted photo- 
graphic prints of human 
figures or animals, some 

two or three 






Comparison of this scene with the lower illustration on the opposite page shows the widely different effects 

it is possible to obtain by making slight rearrangements of the setting and lighting. 




it is very variable and it is 




to work out the exposure 




it is best 



ones 






can 



with an exposure meter or calculator. The 'Wellcome or 
calculators are particularly useful for this purpose. 

Readers who have not yet experimented with 
photography can have no idea of the realistic 

be obtained with even the most simple materials. A heap of alum 
or salt for example, suitably arranged, and lighted from one 
side by means of a 60-watt globe, looks remarkably like a snow- 
covered mountain peak sparkling in sunlight when photographed. 

or rock sprinkled with flour can 

for this purpose, and if a miniature stag 




the making of simple 




Alternatively a lump of 

be used to 






is added to the scene a very life-like effect is obtained. A rocky 

path can be represented by small 

brick and sand, 

selected twigs 

Sawd ust 



uettes of one or two figures such 
as that illustrated. The figures are carefully cut from the selected 

print and pasted to the tissue paper. The "paper is then attached 
to the glass, which is * "* " 



t 



or two 




prop 





on a 





one 



candles or two 40 -watt globes placed behind it 
at such distances as to give even distribution of light over the 
entire area of the glass. 




w hi le a 



provide trees 
coloured grey 







green 



ordinary 



clothes dye bought for a few pence 
can be used for grass. These examples 
serve to indicate the possibilities of 

the 




ha 



■ISUV 

— ■ 

ands 



obtainable materia 




in 



s of an 



ingenious 



and it is great fun to experim 
d i (Teren t s u bstan c es a i i d 



boy or gir 1 , 








■ 




obtained. 




the 




realistic desert scenes shown 
and the opposite page were 

very easily arranged. Small 
coal were used for 
sawdust 
in the 






the sand. The 



pieces 

and line 
"water- 



is merely a 




of white ripple glass. 
for 




piece 



is 





w 




, and a piece 
of suitable size can be obtained quite 

from any glazier. The sea in 





accompanying 
Din 




bound, and 










In some cases the effect is improved by pasting pieces of black 
paper and blades of grass on the glass to suggest the trunks and 
branches of trees, white rocks, ships and hills also may be imitated 
by pieces cut from black paper. This method of silhouette making 
is particularly well suited for the production of humorous effects, 



that alone will provide 



a 



many 




' asaul ovminff's w 




As 
a general rule it will be found that 

with two candles placed about 12 in. 




a 12 in. 




10 



in 



screen an 



exposure of about 3 to 4 minutes will 

for a fast film or plate 





with a lens a 




t ure of 




1. 



Readers who wish to make humorous 

will find it a good plan to 

investigate th- pussibilitie-; ( .t iitrures 




formed from pipe cleaners. With these it 
is easy to make up really amusing groups 
of people or animals in all kinds of 
attitudes, and the field for experiment is 



limited o 




by the imagination. The 



figures can be stuck to the tissue-paper 
screen with Seccotine, or simply placed 
against it wliile they are photographed. In 
the latter case the outlines will be slightly 
blurred. ' 



and this is an advan 




e in 



into harbour, was made by placin 

■ m* - u m — .am n .m. m. 



ring 
outward 

steaming "Pals'"— a simple table-top silhouette suitable for use in making 






photographic Christmas cards or calendars 




a sheet of the glass about half an inch above dark blue paper. 
The background consisted of a sheet of white paper, on 
the sky and clouds were, roughly drawn in with blue and grey 
paint. In making a background of this kind, the broader 

the more realistic will be the resulting photograph. The 
camera was focussed on the nearer ship and the lens aperture 











certain kinds of work. 

The examples of table-top work we have 
described indicate the extent of the 
opportunities the hobby provides for a 
photographer to exercise his imagination 
and artistic ability. 






to 




Panchromatic film was used and an ex- 



posure of 3£ minutes was given, the scene being lighted by means 

of two 60 -watt globes. 



• 



It is great fun to make table-top photographs of dock scenes, 
using the Dinky Toys liners and warships as models. In arranging 
scenes of this kind it is always worth while experimenting with 






The development of the plate or film and the making of the 

nt are of course carried out in the normal manner, but special 

attention must be paid to the finishing of the print. It is probable 

that the table-top scene has not occupied the whole of the plate 

or film and to secure the best effect the unwanted portions must 

trimmed away from the/print. Care must be taken that the 

of the print are parallel with the known vertical lines 

in the picture. 

The need for trimming is too often overlooked by inexperienced 
photographers, but the improvement in appearance of a print 

is properly trimmed is so great that one experiment is sufficient 
to ensure trimming becoming a regular practice. 








614 




MECCANO MAGAZINE 




d 



The Winter Timetables 

The winter timetables introduced last 
month show considerable saving in time on 

* 1 



those of last winter. On the G.W.K. hieh- 



milcage of 462 daily. 

at Sandy, 




stoos 




speed trains cover 2,207 miles at a speed of 
"~ 2, ~ a minute and over. This is an 





Bletchley, the 

and Ox: 




a 




77 miles between 
take If hours. The highest booked average 
speeds are 53.3 m.p.h. from Bletchley 
to Bedford, and 52.1 m.p.h. from Oxford 



in- 



crease of 91 miles over the corresponding 



to Bletchley 



figure 




year. Faster services are pro- 



vided from Paignton and Torquay, Weston- 
super-Mare, Bristol, Bath and Plymouth to 



The Largest Wagon in Britain 




and the new 







eludes 3,644 miles to be covered 

G.W.R. streamlined railcars 



the 

ft 




in- 

by 



The Royal Scot" of the 






is 25 min. 

last year and the total 

saving on the whole of 

L.M.S. 



.S. system 







L.N.E.R. are to build a special 
trolley wagon that will bo capable of carry- 
ing a dead load of 120 tons. This will be the 
largest and heaviest single freight-carrying 

unit in Great Britain. It will have at least 
12 pairs of wheels and will be so arranged 



A Brisk Run Behind "Sir Daniel Gooch" 

Last month we announced that one of 
the latest engines of the G.W.R. "Castle" 

class has been named "Sir Daniel Gooch" 

after the celebrated first Locomotive 

Superintendent of the company and 
designer of the broad-gauge engines. It was 

a happv thought to bestow such 

honoured name upon one of the "Castle" 
class, for to the speed and haulage power 
of the modern type is brought some of 
the romance always associated with 







broad-gauge days. 

As might be imagined 




new 



if 














total of 237 trains 

■ 

fastest train is the 6.20 
from Birmingham to 

covers 

miles from 







Rugby 



to 



Watford 



in exactly 60 min 



The next fastest 



train 



is the "Liverpool Flyer, 
the 5.25 from Lime 

Street, which runs from 




to 




us 




distance 



of 



15S.06 



miles, at a speed of 



64,08 m.p.h. 



ii 



The 



Coronation Scot ' is the 

third fastest train, the 

run from 

■ 

Carlis le 




Daniel Gooch** is a 
speedy runner. As an 

example, on 

u p 



run on 



a recent 
"The 



Bristol i an, 




very ron 




weather, 



some fine speeding was 

done. Adverse signals 






caused a loss of 1 £ min. 
at the start, so that it 
took nearly 13 minutes 

mm 

to pass Stoke Gifford 



East Box, only 6.1 miles 



out. 

fl 



But after 




Sir Daniel Gooch" got 

going in great style and 

hauled his 225-ton load 

over the 72.9 miles on 
to 








being 



to 

made 



A 0-6-0 shunting or "switching" locomotive of the Toronto, Hamilton and Buffalo Railway. The New York Central 
System and the C.P.R. have joint interests in this line. Photograph by H. McMichael, Waterford, Ontario. 



at an average speed of 63.42 m.p.h. 

The L.N.E.R. winter trains cover 3,392 
miles per week more than last year. I in- 
vert services are provided iri East 
Anglia, and faster journeys from Yarmouth 
and Lowestoft to -London are included. 

Glasgow 




that by the use of cantilevers its load 

capacity can be increased at will up to 150 



in 581 

min. A steady 60 m.p.h. 

up the 1 in 300 to 
Badminton was follow- 
ed by a joyous 90 at 

Somerford, and 








loads of 



The early morning service from 
and Edinburgh to King's Cross is acceler- 
ated by 10 min 






s. The wagon will be used 
conveyance of such 

■ 

machinery as stators and "turbines. It will 
e specially adapted for running over the 

of continental railways, thus avoiding 

ing and reloading 







The new Southern Railway timetable 

_ ■ _ _ 



retains the whole of the electric expresses 
running during the summer, including four 




g 




trains per hour from London to 

and four trains per hour to Portsmouth 



the 

for shipment. 

* Kid Gloves for Railwaymen 

Strange to relate, one of the largest and 
most varied collections of gloves in England 



L.M.S. Diesel Train 



In 








the L.M.S. brought into 
service the experimental st ream lined Diesel- 
driven light passenger unit, which has 

one several service tests. The train 

is driven by six 125 h.p, 

traction units 
of a maximum of 75 m.p.h. 

The train makes tliree trips daily from 

to Oxford and two from 
Oxford to Cambridge, with additional 

to 



is to be found, not in an out fitter's shop, but 



east of Swindon speed lay between 80 and 
85 m.p.h. for nearly 30 miles of Level road. 
Reading would have been passed comfort- 
ably ahead of time, but heavier trains, 
normally well ahead of the flyer, had not 

been able to battle so successfully with the 

wind, and a series of slight delays pre- 
vented a punctual arrival in London. The 
net time for the 117.6 mile journey from 
Bristol to Paddmgton was only 102J 

minutes, however; a line performance 
This run was timed by Mr. O. S. " 







at the Swindon Stores of the G.W.R. Gloves 




all 




are 







there, 




the 



G. W.R. Increase Use of Loud-Speakers 

The loud-speaker installations at Pad- 





smart kid gauntlets worn by the company's 

chauffeurs to the specially tested rubber 

gloves worn by men doing high tension elec 



trical work. There are gloves for locomotive 



1 




, for those who 




dington, Birmingham (Snow Hill), Cardiff 
and Newport Stations have proved so 
successful in directing passengers to trains 
during rush periods that the G.W.K. 
are to install similar equipment at Torquay 



that 



w 




once 



to scrap-iron 

Of her 



* 
* 



second 








Cambridge 



short trips from 

and Oxford to Bletchley, making a total 





driver's heart, and for the diver on the 

river bed surveying the piers of a bridge. 

Most of the gloves are designed to give 

protection from fire and electricity, sharp 



loud-speaker unit 
will also be in use this winter at G.W.R. 
stations where large sports crowds are 
anticipated. 



* 



* 



* 



• 




edges and 




acid. 






are all useful, but rarely elegant. 




L.N.E.R. locomotive No. 48(K> has been 

■ * ■ ■ i 

named "The Green Howard" by Major- 
General H. E. Franklyn, P.S.O., IUx. 



t 



« 






A 



• 



I 



e 




MECCANO 




615 






New Australian 4-6-0s 

The upper illustration on this page 
shows one of a new series of locomotives 

introduced in Australia. 

tenders these 

C36 class 






that has 





larger 








for the i r 

engines are identical 

of the New South Wales Government 

Rail w a y 

System , 

The tenders 

in use are 

the largest 
in service in 

Australia. 

The new en - 

gines are 
used on the 
Trans- 
Australian 
line be- 
tween 

Kalgoorlie 

Western 

ustralia) 
and 

Pirie Tunc- 



Improving L.N.E.R, Locomotive Depots 






The last stages of the work in connection 



o 






with the improvements at the L.K.E.K. 

locomotive depot at Lincoln are now in 

hand and a contract has been placed for 
the extension of the general stores, in which 
spare locomotive parts and ma 



G.W.R. Station Improvements 






G.W.R. engineers are 
changing Brunei's famous arch 

ington. The old arrangement 





series 













hipped sky-lights that extend 

from the centre of each of the four spans 
like fishbones js being altered. The new 

glazing now 

being fitted 

the bay 

co vers 

No. 1 

■ ■ 

form follows 
the curve of 
the roof and 
admits more 
light and 
air. This 




b a 

700 

len ,yt h 



I 



i s 
in 



an 





One of the new "C class 4-6-0s with 12,000 gallon tenders delivered to the Commonwealth Railways, 1 hese engines are for working Trans- 
Australian expresses between Port Pirie Junction and Kalgoorlic. Photograph by T. Watson, Sydney, Australia. 



tion, a distance of 1,108 miles. The engines 
are changed once during the run, at Cook, 
which is armroxima 










pp 



point of the journey. 




th 



e half-way 



At 85 
tractive 



per 
effort 




cent, 
of the new engines 




the 



is 
is 



30,5001b. Their length over buffers 
SI ft, 3 in. and the total weight of the 

and tender in full working order 



engine 



is 205 tons 10 cwt. The 




12,000 
of coal. 




ons of water and 




is 



ton s 



L.M.S. Notes 



The L.M.S. ran 11 special trains carrying 
a total of over 5,000 passen- 




be kept. A new locomotive depot is 
being constructed at Darnall, near Sheffield, 
in connection with the Manchester and 

mi ■■ 



Sheffield electrification scheme. This depot 
will provide accommodation for both 
steam and electric locomotives. Work is to 
be commenced almost immediately, as it is 
desirable that this 





should be ready for the changeover which, 

to present schedules, should 



according 



take place in about two years. 

At Darlington, where the depot is being 
completely modernised, a contract for the 

rebuilding of the locomotive sheds has 

already been let. This depot has associations 



and 95 tons of steel 




the work 
will involve 

the use of 

29,000 sq. 
ft. of glass 



The cleaning of the roof will in future 



be much 

gangways are 

with a water supply 




new 



^ w* 



lei 






at 





every 40 ft. The cleaners will work from 

orms mounted on ball- 
wheels, which will run on rails 
stretching the whole length of each 
side of the bay. 

At St. Davids, Exeter, the G.W.R. 
are carrying out the first instalment of 



their com 



ensive scheme of improve- 
ments. This part of the scheme provides 







gers 



to 




for the 



launching of the new Cunard 

White Star liner "Queen 
Elizabeth' " on 27 th Sep- 
tem ber. 

The Garratt locomotives 
Nos. 4967-1999 

renu 

order to provide for 

class 5P5F 4 






Ted 7967-7999 in 




1 1 p > - - 
(S^iis. 



All-steel 



wagons 



of 




tons capacity are being 
built for Imperial Chemical 

■ HI 

Industries traffic There will 
be 50 of them, and they will 
be used for the conveyance 
of light soda ash in bulk. 
The L.M.S. print five tons 
of tickets each week, rep re- 
senting five mill ion pieces of 

. The annual 
consumption of the company 
is five million tons, a total 

that keeps 18,000 miners 

busy all the year round. 
Nearly 15, 



\ 






L.M.S . em- 
ployees will attend evening 

winter at the 




for the complete remodelling of the station 

building on the down side, 
the widening of the station 

11 ft. 




side bv 






distance of 170 ft., 
and the erection of a canopy 
covering for cars, 350 ft. 
in length and running along 
the whole front of the 
building. The present archi- 

:ures 






station will be 

and the new work will 

be laced with stone to 



match 
pleted 




that the corn- 
will be in 



harmony with the Cathedral 

■f 

City. 

Traffic Speed-Up at Holyhead 

With a view to speeding- 
up the handling of news- 
papers and merchandise be- 
an d steamers 





c 





*The Coronation Scot** leaving Euston in charge of No, 6223, 

streamlined 4-6-2s, Photograph by J. P. Wilson, No 



"Princess Alice," one of the blue 

am. 




company s expense 





of 



railway work will be taught at these classes. 

New L.N.E.R. Luxury Train 




month the L.N.E.R. placed in ser- 
vice a new train, between Liverpool Street 
and Harwich (Parkeston Quay). It is known 
as the "Hook Continental" and, consists of 11 

coaches having seats for 84 first and 240 

second class passengers. In accordance with 






are 



services, two 
attached. The " 




CorUinentaV* leaves Liverpool St* at 8, 1 5 a.m. 

and the up train commences at 6:20 a.m. 

* m 

arriving at Liverpool Street at 7.53. 



with the earliest 





in the 



country, and when complete will be one of 
the most up-to-date on the L.N.E.R. A 



mechanical 



coaling 



plant, new 



engine 



disposal pits, up-to-date repair equipment, 
new offices and a new mess room are all 
included in the scheme. The present 
turntable is to be replaced by one of 
70 ft. diameter, which will be able to 

at present 



at Holyhead, the L.M.S. 

are to' histal conveyors. 

The conveyor on the quay 

will include a portable sec- 
tion of belt 43 ft. long and 

3 ft. wide, adjustable for all 

conditions of the tide and with speed 



variable up to a rn umum of 200 ft. per 
min. Each of the three steamers working 



between Holyhead and Kingstown will 



be fitted with 
conveyor, which 




distributing 
stored on the 




with 



the largest engines 



in use. 



* 



* 



* 



* 









L.M.S. Film Units have commenced their 






tour of the system and 100,000 members of 
the L.M.S. staff are expected to visit them. 



ship's deck when not in use, 

L.M.S. Centenary Exhibition at Birmingham 

Last month the L.M.S. arranged for the 
"Century of Progress" Exhibition held at 
Euston to be repeated in Birmingham. 
Historic locomotives and coaches were on 












show and a collection of relics and models 
were exhibited at the City Art Gallery. 






616 



THE MECCANO MAGAZINE 



nnnnDanDaDDDDnnnnnnnnnnnnnDnnnnnnannnnnnnnnnnnnnDnDnnnnnnnnnnnnnn 



□ 

□ 

a 
a 

a 
a 

a 
□ 
a 

a 

a 






a 









n 

□ 

□ 



Cocoons 





to 






By L. Hugh Newman 



□ 

□ 

□ 

□ 



nnnnnDnnDnnnDnnnnnnnnDnnnnannnnannnnnnaannnnnDnnnnnnDannnnnnnDnnD 





ucing insects of the world 




one 







the largest family of moths, and their life histories are 



apple, but 




of the elderberry are their favourites. 



Another silk moth from 





\merica is one that has 
the picturesque English 

J- J. o 



ing. Most of them have 
on one or both pairs of 

distinct 
that 













serve as warning colour- 
ation. All the moths in 
this familv 
plump bodies that woui < 1 

a tasty meal for 

W 

any in sect- eating animal 

or "bird. When they are 

i forewings 
over 



















name of tin- robin moth. 
It is very lovely to lool 
at, tor it 

banded 




"eye- 
wings are of rich brown, 
shading to pink and 
cream. It naturally feeds 
on much the same kind 



o 



i f 






o 







as 





sill 



V 




-.o in 





ose 



hind wings, the 

are covered; but ini- 

the insects 

are disturbed they raise 
and expand their wings 

the 

spots, which give the 
impression that some 
animal has awakened and opened its huge eyes! 

Apart from our old friend the silkworm moth, the silk 
moth most commonly reared in this country is the oak 

* - 

is idea poly- 



moth, 

case the difficulty of 
feeding the caterpillars, 
which sometimes makes 

ii impossible io breed 

foreign 
land, 



insects in ling- 
no diffi- 




culties. The caterpillars 






An Alias moth drying its wings shortly after emerging from its silk cocoon. These giant moths from the 
Himalayas often require a whole night \m this, and in the meantime they hang motionless from 

a twig, as shown in this illustration. 










ves are 






silk moth, the 




name of 




phemits. This richly coloured moth is a native of North 



ng creatures, green- 
ish-blue in colour, with 
pink "prickles/* or tubercles as we call them, all over their 

, They do not look anything like the caterpillars we 






where it is 




see in this country, and for this fact alone it is interestin 
to breed them, and to watch them develop through their 

emerge as 



successive 




until 





com 



mercially for its pure white silk. 
Its larvae feed on oak leaves, and 
are possibly the most beautiful in 
the world. They are really quite 

rive in our i limate. 



ha 









When the cater 

have 






green coloured skins, flecked all 
over with gold and silver "spots," 



which 





in tl 




sunlight 





effect as. though studded 



wi th 



jewels. They 




ange 



habit of 




have 
at ing 




their 




heads at any sign of danger. This 

action makes them 
and apparently has an alarming 
effect on any bird that settles near 
them with an eye to a nice juicy 




meal, as they are seldom attacked 
in the wild. 

These moths spend the winter 



as 



pupae 




cocoons 



* 



and 




glorious moths. 



Of the 







o 





s we can 








easily breed in our own gardens, 
the simplest to deal with, and at 

same time the most beautiful, 

are the two moon moths, 

and the other of 

- 

North America. Visitors to 

House at the London Zoo 

no doubt have seen these 




a 











pale-green moths, with long sweep- 
ing 




s, 



* VJ ' .g 

fluttering about in the 




little glass houses specially heated 

n lighted for them. 

e dark-brown cocoons 




of 





















indoors 



d be kept 
warm room away 



from frost. About the middle of 

and 





scratching 





emerge in May or earlv June. The 
eggs are deposited on the under- 
side of an oak leaf, and it has been found that the tiny 
caterpillars when just hatched welcome a varied menu of 
food in the form of green leaves. They flourish and grow 
fat on the leaves of the willow, plum] hawthorn, pear or 



An Indian moon moth, photographed a few hours after emerging 

from the pupa, brought to Ibis country by air mail. 



noises suddenly may be 
These are made 
ling moth trying to get out 
of its cocoon. Now is the time for 

action. In the wild state the 








cocoon would" be 




to a 




atmosphere and would be fairly soft, so that the 
moth inside would be able to push its way to liberty. A 
cocoon kept in the manner described is hard and tough. 
however, ant 




s 



hould be 




in a basin of 



tf 



* 



f 



a 






r 



% 



t 



* 




MECCANO 





7 



tepid water for a few minutes. An airing cupboard back- 
ing on to a water tank in the bathroom is the best place of 
all to stand the cage .when the mot lis are emerging. Then 
there will be none of the crippled moths that are obtained 
when the cocoons are not treated prop 

It is a revelation to 

watch one of these moon 
moths actually emerge. 



r « 




w 




s" 



appear 



soon the caterpillar 
grows as thick as the thumb, and the "warts" turn bright 
yellow and become larger, crowned with magnificent tufts 
of hair. By about the end of August they should begin 







First 




o 





ng 



> > 



the 



noises 




are 





heard, and then careful 

■ 

reveals a 
l appearing at one 

end of the cocoon, where 
the moth has p 
alkaline 

of 

the side of 




an 






on the 

against 
hollow 




When this 




line liquid has softened 
the gum that holds the 

threads 

■ 

the moth inside com- 





mences to "tease 



f i 



the 



fibres apart by using its 




cocoons, rather large, flexible, brownish 

balls of silk. 

It is from India that 




in 



t he largest 

the world come to us, in 

the fonn of live pupae of 



the 



Atlas moth 






i 



air mail in 

November or December. 

Natives are employed to 
go out into the jungle 
and collect the cocoons, 








which in 

the insects arc common 






are dotted about among 
the foliage like plums on 



a 



plum 



tree. 



As 



a 




of fact these 

balls of brown silk do 
not look unlike plums! 

are 



head as a battering ram. The oak sUk mottl a na live oi North America thai thrives in Great Britain. The caterpillar is apple 

^■b ■ ii I i_ I I _ _l_ l . A _^B. 





It seems that the moth 



green, flecked with gold and silver spots 




1 



leeds this violent exercise, for on more 




one 



occasion I have "helped" a moth out when it seemed to be 



"stuck," or too exhausted to get out by itself, and in each 
case the lovely tapering tails have never developed 




The tune 






is take to 



and dry 

their wings is amazing. Some of the largest wait a day or 




light but 



st r o n g 



wood, and 



boxes, made of a very 

by t he 








possible air liner carrying mail to this country. 
A collector of my acquaintance tells me that these giant 

insects look more like unga 










down the lower slopes of the Him 

_ 




once 



can 
out 




more before 




Moon moths 



i 



usually take about four hours to 
unfurl their wings, but sometimes 
one that is apparently a cripple in 

to 



the evening will prove 
perfect next morning. 
It is wo 



be 









aiing 




a 




room or an attic in order to 
give these moths plenty of space 
to liy and pair, and they will not 
spoil their wings so badly if ceiling 
and walls are draped with muslin. 
They appear to have to learn to 

At first thev have a curious 







way of jerking their wings in one 
sharp flip, which shoots them into 



the air like a slur 



fall clumsily down 




only to 
floor 







Each moth will do this a 



dozen or more times 






and then it looks like 
a great white bat. 

Of the two moon moths, one 
from India, and the other 







the 

the best to breed over 



former is 




row to an enormous size. A female I 

in a greenhouse measured just 
under a foot across the wings, 

that even 









and I 





specimens 
the 





caught in 




Most people favour breeding 



this mo 



in a 





oors on cut 




<■■■.■ 






as 




caterpillars are inclined to be 
delicate, resenting cold winds, 

in tern- 

for 
of 





best 



room 




stove or open 





1 




feed in 

given 



ght 



if poss 






f r es h 



b o ughs 



favourite food every da\ 



with a 

burning day 

and the 

should be 

their 
so 



of 





free 

will feed on 





plum, apple, 



beech, and barberry, but I have 
always found they do best on 



willow, which 





er. 




as 




caterpillars will feed on a variety 

of foods, including leaves of the walnut, hawthorn, plum, 



The robin moth of Nortn America, an attractive silk moth that can 

be reared from cocoons bought in Great Britain. 



a 




a e, nut, and wild cherry. The American moth will only 
feed on walnut, and is smaller when it is bred in captivity. 
Both 





r names from the crescent marks in 








centre of each wing. 




commencing soon 
into the Summer. In order to get 
eggs, it is best to keep the cocoons 
thev won't emerge 



Breeders must be patient when 

they receive their cocoons, as the 
moths emerge over a long period, 
Christmas and continuing right 




before the 




are m 




Note: 




author of this article will be 



The tiny caterpillar of the Indian moon moth on first 

g from the egg is red and black, * 
casting it takes on a green shade and a number of 





after 





to give 
on the rearing of silk 




further information and 

moths to any reader who writes to him at The Butter 




Farm, 




x 




Kent. 











I 






618 



THE 









meer 




and 



Inventor 







Whitaker 




HOSE who read the article in the 




issue of the "MM" 



on the working of "The Pines Express" over the Somerset and 
Dorset Toint Railway will remember the references to single-line 
working over sections of that line, and to the 

apparatus employed for the mechanical ex- 

of 



nnnnnnnnnnnncannnnnnnnnn 

engines than those for which turntables were designed. A tender 

water indicator and an inclined traverser for moving locomotives 






change of single line tablets. 

apparatus used has always been associated with 

Somerset and Dorset system , for it was 
originally designed by Mr. Alfred Whitaker, 
who for 22 years held the position of Locomo 

riage 



live, Carriage and Wagon Superintendent at 

the Highbridge works of that company. Mr. 

Whi taker's recent death at the age of 91 has 
removed from the railway world a remarkable 



personality 



with 





professional 
r e and ra" 





work 




back to 1860. Readers will be interested in the 
career of this ingenious and versatile engineer, 
and through the courtesy of his son, Mr. A. H. 
Whitaker, at present L.M.S. District Locomo- 
tive Superintendent at Bristol, we are able to 
publish the accompanying portrait and details 
of the life of this remarkable railwayman. 

Alfred Wliitaker's railway career commenced 
at the age of 14, when as a pupil he entered the 
Derby Works of the former Midland Railway. 



After serving seven years in working through 



all 




different branches of locomotive con 




from one line to another in shops fitted with only one overhead 

crane also were among his inventions. One of 

these traversers was in use in Highbridge 




Works for nearly 40 years 

The invention that brought the name of 

aker most prominently before the railway 
world was the apparatus, already referred to, 
for exchanging train tablets on single line rail- 
ways. It was first used on the Somerset and 
Dorset svstem in 15:105 and is in use to-day in 

various parts of the world- Its purpose was to 

allow exchanges to be made at speeds of 50 
m.p.h. or 60 m.p.h,, thus avoiding waste of 
time in stopping or slowing down. 

The train tablet is encased in a leather 

pouch with a steel loop attached to it, and how 



this is 




on the 




- 

me or 




for 



exchange is shown in the lower illustration on 
this page. The turnover arm carrying it is attach- 
ed to a bracket, and projects from the side 
of the tender when set for exchange. At its end 
are a pair of jaws to engage the steel loop 

tablet from the lineside, 



when pickin 



ft 



up 



a 



struction, he spent six months firing on shunting, 

goods and passenger engines. In those day- the Alfred Whitaker at the age of 90 

minimum hours were 72 a week. The engines «*irt**v of his son. Mr. A. H. v 



courtesy of his son, Mr. A. H. Whitaker, Bath. 



spring triggers closing behind the loop to 

prevent it from rebounding after being caught. 

The rear end of the jaw is constructed so as 

to carry the tablet about to be given up at the 

Photographs by end of the section over which it gives the 



driver the right to proceed. The pouch is lie Id 



were fitted with hand brakes, which it was the duty of the iireman 
to operate, and the protection from the weather was the very 
inadequate weather board. St. Pancras had not then been built, 
and Midland trains reached London by the Great Northern line, 



running into King's Cross. 

After completing his training Mr. Whitaker was given 




in a spring clip with the loop projecting upward in a position in 
which it can be caught 




the jaws of the ground apparatus, 
which is carried on a column at the lineside. The column has two 
arms, the upper one to receive a tablet and the lower one to carry 

1 ed up. The arms normally stand parallel to 





of the locomotive 



was 






appou 



La ncaster 
to a similar 



position at Bradford. When the Midland line 
was extended to Carlisle in 1875, he was put 
in charge of locomotive matters in the Carlisle 
district and six years later became District 
Locomotive Superintendent at Leeds. 

It was in connection with the Somerset and 







Dorset line, however, that Alfred Whitaker 
was best known. This system >yas o 
an independent line, but in 1876 it became the 
joint property of the Midland and L.S.W; 




Locomotive 







then came 



under the control of the Midland authorities 



at Derby, and from that time engines for 
Somerset and Dorset work were, in fact, built 
to Derby designs. In some cases they were 
practically replicas of Midland types of the 



time, and the appointment of a locomotive 
engineer who had been trained at Derby to 

supervise local mechanical affairs therefore 
was a natural step. 

Mr. Whitaker became the Locomotive, Car- 
riage and Wagon Superintendent of the 
Somerset and Dorset Railway in 1889 and 
during his term of office he was responsible for 
the building of the Company's wor 

including the installation of 
and plant. He also brought 

the rolling .stock up to date by the introduction 
of new and more 

rebuilding of the 





tablet to be 

the running track, but they are swung out at right angles to the 

line when it is required to exchange tablets 
so as to bring them into such a position that 





11 



are re 

ig appan 



The moment 




engage with 




on 








exchange has been made, 



the arms automatically swing back clear of 

the line to their normal position. 

Alfred Whitaker retired from railway work 
in 1911, and in 1915 he was elected to the 

Board of the Whitwick 





Company, 

estersliire, where his mechanical skill and 

inventive ability found ample scope during 
the complete modernisation of the equipment 

Out at Whitwick a few 





and plant 

years ago. One of his inventions was an 
ingenious arrangement of automati 
operated pithead gates. An interesting 
is that he always made his own working 
drawings and tracings, from which the blue 
prints were taken by the engineers; and as an 

instance of his practical skill may be men- 
tioned a working model of his pithead gates 

made to demonstrate their action 










were installed at the Whitwick 



Colliery. 



was 



In addition to his 

a Director 





new 




Whitaker tablet exchange apparatus in the working 

osttion on a locomotive* When out of action the arm 



II I L 



pow 
old 



erf ul locomotives and 



is turned back to lie parallel to the tender side and 
the jaws then are allowed to hang downward. 




activities he 
Swanmngton 
this position 

death. He was keenly 




Pumping 

at the time 

interested in technical education and was a 






member of the Technical Education Com- 

■ • m iF a 




■ 

ighbridge 



ones, and by building a large number of 
passenger and goods vehicles of various types in the 
shops. The Company's steamers plying in the Bristol Channel 
also came under his supervision. 



During his railway career extending over a period of nearly 51 





numerous 




in 




years Mr. Whitaker brou 

with railway equipment. These included adjustable extension rails, 

or "crocodiles" as they were known, to allow the turning of longer 









mittee of Burnham and Highbridge for a number of years. Many 

engineers holding important positions in various parts of 

world owe their success in life, in no small measure, to the earlv 




training, 




1 



ira 









w h ic h the y rece i ved 






under his ever watchful supervision, and firm but kindly guidance. 



He retired finally in February of this year, so ending an engineer- 



ing career of nearly 74 years 



active service, of 




ich 51 years 



were spent on the Midland and Somerset and Dorset Railways 




* 



9 



*1 








MAGAZINE 



619 



r 



* 



* 



nnnnnnnnDnnnannDnnnnnnnnnnnnnnna 

n 
a 

a 









of 



□ 

a 

a 

a 
a 

nnnannnnnnnntxinnnnnn 

■ 

UHtNG the past five years the research engineers of the 
Westinghouse Electric and Manufacturing Company have been 
making experiments with artificial lightning, and in that time have 
sent a quarter of a million flashes, each of more than three million 
volts, into transmission poles and steel -covered electrical apparatus. 
This number of discharges is greater than the number of strokes of 
natural Lightning sustained by i he 






Million 



□□□□□□□nnnn 

□ 

□ 

□ 

□ 

D 

□ 
□ 





mission 





in perfect sequence was a difficult one, and was solved by the use of 
what is described as a microsecond switch. This is a block of 



insu 




of the United 




l voltage power trans 

during that time. 



metal that melts when the voltage reaches a certain 

critical value', setting free the high current and combining it with 
high pressure to form a genuine replica of real lightning, representing 
all its effects from the crash of thunder to the shattering of poles and 



steel-covered electrical apparatus. The switch takes its 

1 L 




from its 



The average flow of current in each flash 




to act in a millionth of a second 



■** 



was approximately 65,000 amp., and if the 
energy in all these discharges of artificial 

lightning were released at once it would be 
sufficient: to light 333 million 60 W. lamps, 
or more than are in operation at any one 
time in the world — but they would onlv be 

lit for a second ! The total current anion 1 1 toe I 

to 16 thousand million amperes, and its 



cost at a charge of about 2 id. per kilowatt 



hour or unit would work out at a little 
more than four shillings for every thousand 
strokes. 



It is estimated 




anv stretch of 



transmission line a mile in length is not 
struck more than once in two years in the 
United States, although there may be 
millions of lightning strokes to earth in 

the same time. Nevertheless lightning 
Could play havoc with power transmission 

lines and electrical apparatus connected 

, ■P-. rfc 

to them if it were allowed to have its own 

years ago, 





way. It did so seve 

there was no means of preventing a really 

violent stroke from flashing over insulators 

Insulators 







were 



and burning a path to 

made stronger, and protective de- 
vices such as lightning resisters were de- 
veloped as a result of studies on natural 
lightning, in which its power was measured 

carefully examined. The 







and its 

engineers who did this were handicapped 
by not knowing where the lightning would 
strike, however, and this led them to make 
their own lightning. With the aid of con- 
densers they were able to imitate natural 

to its v 







m 

density of the current, but at first 

were unable to reproduce these together, 
as Nature does, and thus to imitate her 
destructive force. 

Nature builds up a giant electric charge 

m the clouds. The clouds rise to very high 



voltage front 

which 






moisture 
by their 

movement, through the air and forced up 

by wind action. The earth has an opposite 
charge and the air serves as an insulator 

1 dis- 




to 



This man-made lightning has been used 

Otnbard electrical apparatus and 



equipment. It lias been photographed by 
special cameras and its effects have been 



measured, with the result that the average 




stroke has been found to consist of a core, 
about the size of a man's finger, which 
n completion of the discharge explodes 
into a column of sponge-like fire about 

four inches in diameter. This explosion is 

the cause of the thunder. Pressures of up to 
20.00D lb. per sq. in. are reached in the 

core when the discharge is con fin* 1, and it 
is these pressures that "in a lightning stroke 

rip trees and crack metal pipes. The 
discharge also is very hot, the temperature 



rising to 




14,0ti0 deg. 



high enough to vaporise 
Earth if it were sustained. 











ructive 





to u 

o f light n i n 







on 



objects that it strikes. The discharge from 

a thunder cloud consists of a relatively 
harmless leader stroke that cuts the trail to 





followed by a heavier core 
carrying with it the heat and destructive 

energy. The speed of the leader stroke is 

about 186 miles a second, but the heavy 
current discharge that follows when an 
object is struck moves 200 times as quickly. 



The 



YYestinghouse 



lightning machine 






reproduces these components of lightning 

discharge from the 
voltage generator opening the path, 
the microsecond switch then releasing 

the current from the second generator 
to form the core. 

By wresting these secrets from lightning 
engineers have learned how to defend their 
products against its attack. Only five years 
ago it was almost certain that a direct 

lightning hit on a distribution transformer 
would blow it up 

interruption until the transformer could 
be replaced, and at times large areas of a 




cause a sen-ice 







vecn the tivo. A thunder 





Hny discharge* of artificial 
failed to injure the tra 
illustration* Photograph by courtesy 
and Electric Manufacturing 




charges its load of electricity as a lightning 
stroke when some good conductor such 
as a church steeple or tree comes between it and the earth. 

It has long been known that a stroke of lightning combines a 
heavy flow of current with pressure up to about 10,000,000 volts, 
but it was not until live years ago that a generator and a switch 



lightning at three million volts 

?n under test in this 

of the Westinghouse 

Company, Pittsburgh, U.S.A. 



city were plunged into darkness moment- 
arily during a thunderstorm. To-day only 

the most severe of lightning strokes will 
affect a protected transformer. These now 



are equipped with what are known as 



de-ion protector tubes, which consist 





ile of imitating a powerful segment of natural lightning were 
invented. This achievement is due to Dr. BeUaschi, of the Westing- 
house Electrical and Manufacturing Company, whose generator is in 

two parts. One consists of a huge three-store v stairway of 36 banks 
of condensers, each with a charge of 1 00,000 Volts* so that the 



combined output is 3.600,000 volts. The second is formed of eight 



two electrodes and a fibre lining. The tube allows a lightning stroke 
to pass out of the power line, but the normal current carried by the 

line is unable to follow. One of these protected transformers has 

been hit 50 times by man-made lightning without any ill effects. 
Larger new type lightning arresters have been designed to utilise a 
spark gap ami a block of highly resistant material, which holds 

down the high voltage of the lightning stroke by drawing current 

out of it and leading it to earth. The ordinary line v 






anks of eight condensers, carried on a shorter stairway, each of 

represents a certain volume of thunder cloud. When acting 




they 




uce a current of 150,000 amp. lasting over 



a period of 200 milhonths of a second. 

The problem of releasing the outputs of the two sets of condensers 



powerful enough to force current through the block, and thus the 
urrent remains in the line to Continue its useful work. 

-r 

Following ui>on these experiments with high-voltage discharges, 
a dozen lightning generators of Dr. Bcllaschi's design have been 
constructed and put into operation. All are being used to reveal 
more secrets, a knowledge of which will help to take more risks 

out of living. 



620 



THE 




MAGAZINE 







« 




The New 



On 14th September 



Zeppelin 



*} 








recent 



Gen-nan airship, LZ 130, was named "Graf 
^^^- u n H" at Friedrichshafen by Dr. 

Eckener, and thus became the 
successor of the famous 
name which was withdrawn 





last year. 
803 ft. 



service 



The new 






Zeppelin" is 

and her four Daimler-Benz 

engines develop a total of about 

a cruising speed of 









More Boeing Bombers for United States 

Army Air Corps 

In 1937 the United States Army Air 

Corps acq ui red a fleet of 13 Boeing YB-17 

These 






Flying Fortress" heavy 
e aircraft have proved 

_ - • _ ■ 








2,800 h.p., giving 

nearly 80 m.n.h. 




engine is insta 




in 



a .separate gondola, and these are 



two 
and 





that a further 26 have been ordered for the 
Corps. Delivery of these is to begin early 
next year, and it is expected that the entire 
eet will be completed early in 1940. 
The "Flying Fortress" is a streamlined 
all-metal middle wing monoplane 105 ft, 
span, 70 ft, long, and with a gross weight 





Scientists 





orers Use Aircraft 



The value of aircraft in aiding scientists 
when making expeditions into remote and 

partially-explored territories is demon- 

by an undertaking being carried 

out by the American Museum of 

History. A party of naturalists representing 





the Museum are 




a couple of years 



in various parts of New Guinea, studying 
ui " A " and animals. They arc using a 




underneath, the body of 
the airship. The vessel is 
designed to be filled with 
helium, but as the United 
States Government still 

■ 

refuse to supply this gas 
to the company, the 16 

gas-bags have been filled 
with hydrogen, of which 

contain a total of 
7,062,000 cm ft. After 
the c hr isten in g the ' 'Graf 
Zeppelin II" made a suc- 
cessful trial flight lasting 
eight hours, with Dr. 




Eckenef 
Schiller 




von 



control 



room, and 75 people on 

board i of whom 35 were 
crew and the remainder 



officials. 



Other 




flights have since 



carried 



out 



A 




flight across the Atlantic 
will not be undertaken 
until a supply of helium 

is 




specially-equipped flying boat to maintain 
communication between their camps in the 
interior and a supply base on the coast, and 

for the expedi- 
are being dropped 






by parachute, 
also being employed to 



- 

is 



take specimens 






the 




stored ready for despatch 
to America. 

Mr. Lincoln Ellsworth, 

the American 

also makes use of aircraft 





ex 




itions. Re- 
he flew as a 

passenger in an Imperial 
Airways flying boat from 

England to Africa. From 

Kistimu he travelled in 
another aeroplane into 

J- 

-game territory, 

one of the chief 









objects of his visit is to 






films of wild life in its 
natural .surroundings. 
When this work is com- 







e 










Mr. Ellsworth will 

.. . ■ . ,■ 



join 



forces 



with 



Sir 





use in- 



stead of hydrogen. After 

this flight the "Graf 
Zeppelin II" will be 
the 



This view of a HancUey Page "Hampden' ' Bomber in flight shows the gun turret in the nose and the unusual 
haimnv. b e i ow the wing, In which the rear gun is installed. (Sec special article on page 628.1 Photograph 

by courtesy of "The Aeroplane." 



Hubert Wilkins. another 



..., 



balcony, 



American explorer, for a 

exploration 









to resume 



German airship service to America 
that is at present sus 

A 




l< 



Sunderland* ' 




ed 



ng Boats for the R.A.F. 



' i 





The latest type of-flying boat to be built 

for the R.A.F. is the Short "Sunderland/' 

a military development 
flying boats used by Imperial Airways. 
The pilots' cabin is much farther aft than 
in the civil aircraft, as a power-driven gun 
turret is fitted in the nose of the hull, and 
there is also one in the stern. The "Sunder- 

asus" engines, 



of more than 20 tons. It is fitted with four 
1,000 h.p. Wright "Cyclone" engines, and is 
stated to be one of the fastest aircraft of its 
e in the world. Normally it carries a 
crew of five to seven men. There are five gun 




Enderby Lane, in 




turret in 



the 




The 





. ■ 





of 



over 








four Bristol 

and is believed to be 
2(>0 miles per hour. 

A squadron of these new 
is now stationed at Singapore. ThcTiircraft 
were flown to that base one at a time by 
crews provided by No. 210 (General 
Reconnaissance) Squadron, of Pembroke 
Dock. One of them, flown by Flight Lieut. 
W. A. Hughes, covered the 1,250 miles from 

Dock to Gibraltar in S hrs„ 
averaging a speed of 156.25 m.p.h., and the 
1,200 miles from there to Malta in only 

6| hrs., at an average of 177.77 m.p.h. 



positions, one of which is the usual gun 

nose of the fuselage 
arrangement of the other four is interesting, 
as thev are in the form of streamlined 

s" in the fuselage, one about t wo- 
rds of the way 
almost mid -way 

fuselage, and the fourth just over half- 
way 

that 



Antarctic. Their equipment will include 

ungle-engined monoplanes, 

*. . «*, Delta" and an "Aeronca," 

and these are now on board the Norwegian 
- 1 --- "Wyatt Earp," which is on its way to 





II > 




l 



Antarctic. The 



as a 






*• 



Delta" will 




be used 



as a means 




of 'communication with the ship. 
Automatic Radio Distress Signal for Aircraft 





one 

the 






capacity, and 



. range, 
heavy 




It is 

bomb-carrying 
nsive armament 






of the "Flying Fortress" make it a very 
formidable Air Force weapon. 



In February last six United 



Army Air 

made a record 




ti 





ornia Institute of 



an 





have 

signal for aircraft making forced landings. 
A battery-operated radio transmitter, 

from fire, is suspended from coil 
Springs in the tail of the fuselage, the part 
of the aeroplane least likely to be wrecked 





by such a landing. The heavy 




when the 

■ 



Flying Fortresses" 

from 




one-stop mass flight 
Miami, Florida, to Buenos Aires, Argentina, 
and covered the distance of 5,260 
in a total living time of 27 hrs, 50 min. 

This was the longest mass flight ever 





carried out by that Corps. 
route was at Lima, in Peru. 



Tl 



le 




en 






aeroplane strikes the ground will start the 
set transmitting short-wave distress signals 
and it is claimed that these will continue 
uninterruptedly for" four days however 
badly the aeroplane may have been 
smashed. The signals should prove of great 

to 
e in mountainous or 



help to the pilots of aircraft tryin 




a \v 




ma 










f-i 






other isolated 





** 



V 



a 



# 




MECCANO 





■ 



t 



C 



c 



Monoplane Fitted with Twin Engines 

Driving a Single Airscrew 

In last month's "Air News" we reported 
the successful tests in America of a new type 






of engine installation called "Unitwin 
Power,'* in which two in-line aero engines 
are coupled together side by side and drive 
a single airscrew through 



up-to-date aeroplane, a D.H. ■ Dragon" air 
ambulance, which within two weeks of being 

put into service made three long-distancr 

S.O.S. flights, flying a total of 1,500 miles. 

Another Fine Flight by "Mercury" 

Another long-distance flight has been 



" 



made by "Mercury/' the upper comj 




Nautical Uniforms for Empire Flying Boat 




ins 







Until recently the Captains of 
Airways flying boats wore a uniform cut 

on R,A.F. lines and including a double- 
breasted coat with outside pockets, brass 

and stripes 

the cuffs. 

■ 







since 



gearing. It has 

announced 
low wmi; 

monoplane designed to 
take this interesting en- 





unit is to be 



gme 

duced bv the Ve 




i 



pro- 

A ir- 



plane Company, a sub- 
sidiary of the Lockheed 



A i re n 




■ 




It 



will be of metal construc- 
tion with a wing span of 



41 ft*, and will have seat- 
ing for five or six persons 
iceore liner to whether it 



« 



is required as a private 

aeroplane or for operat- 
ive air 
undercar- 



ing 



on 



services. 




riage will be of the three- 
wheel , or 




type now coming 

fashion. The nose wheel 



■ 



will retract into a recess 



in 




underside of 




A remarkable 
have traced l tie 



engine compartment and 

the two main wheels into 
the wings. 

The two engines 



coupled together will be 280 h,p. "Menas 




: on 

u n i f or in 

lias been succeeded by 

one of a nautical type 

in which the double- 







coat has black 
buttons, and the officer's 
rank is indicated by 

are 
worn 



epaulettes, 

ornam 

on the shoulder^ 





United States to Build a 



Large Airship 



The 






Congress 



of the 



United States has voted 



/ 100,000 toward 



the 



a 



cos 1 o £ 

new large airship, 650 ft. 



constructing 



long and of 3,000,000 
cu. ft. capacity. This 
news indicates a revival 

this 

that 

lapsed after the loss 
of the "Macon" in Febru- 
ary 1935. The "Macon" 




m 

photograph in which the rays reflected from the Croydon airport floodlights by the metal blades, 
ic circular path of the airscrew. The liner is a Lockheed **Elcctra" of British Airways Ltd., 



was 78n ft. 



her 



long 



and 



helium -filled gas 




» » 



mm in 




in the nose of the fus 




e 



and driving a single constant-speed air- 
screw. No performance figures are available 
yet, but the company state that the mono- 
plane will be capable of flying at over 200 

m.p.h., and at cruising speed will have a 



range of about 1,000 miles. It is expected 







the 




of t 




aeroplanes will be 



ready by the middle of next January. 
Good Work by Douglas DC-3 Air Liners 



to whom we arc indebted for the photograph 

of the Mayo composite aircraft, this time to 
South 




The composite aircraft took 
off from Dundee on 6th October last, and 

when it had reached a height of 




4,700 ft. and a speed of 160 m.p.h. the two 





; 




sties published recently in the 



United States 



set off on 

her (>, 370 -mile flight to Capetown, and the 
flying boat "Mai a" returned to Dundee, The 
seaplane was piloted by Capt. D. C. T. 

Bennett. 

It was hoped to make the flight to 

Capetown non-stop, and thus beat the 
record set up by the Soviet airmen last year 



bags had a total capacity 
of 6,500.000 cu. ft. She 
was wrecked during a storm off the 
Californian coast, but fortunately 81 
of her crew of 83 were rescued. 

American Lockheed '* 




er 



Electras 



M 



for British Airways 




four Lockheed 14 "Super Electras" 

Airways have been delivered. 



T 

for 

They were shipped 




to So u t ha m p ton, 

where they were re -as sembled and then 
flown to 




n airport, now 




i 



11" 




s of the 



■ 




An 







. 



show 




at the 



end of last June 



t h ere 



were 



102 



Douglas DC-3 air 
liners in service 
in that 

a nd t hat 

them 





complet- 

1,000 hrs. of 
There are 

Douglas 

DC-2 air liners in 

daily service on 

American air lines. 




all Of 




had 




flight was carried out with one of 

, the first two to 

be readv for ser- 

- 

vice. It flew non- 
stop from London 
to Stockholm in 

> 36 miti. 



4 



• _ < 







> 




an 



average 

speed of 212 

m.p.h., and the 
return trip was 

in 6 hrs. 
10 min,, 





completed over 
2,500 hours' flying 

by the end of 
June. One of them 

had flown a total The Foekc-Wuli "WcUie' 1 Trainer. This very adaptable monoplane can be used for instruction in blind flying, radio, machine 

gunnery, and bombing. Photograph by courtesy of Fockc-Wulf Flugzeugbau A-G., Bremen. 



the average speed 

of 146 m.p.h. 

1 he new liners 
are to be used for 

its be- 

tween London and 

Li sbon . and 












of 9,000 hrs., and 

15 had completed 8,000 hrs, in the air. 

■ 

British Air Ambulance in Australia 

One of the best uses to which aircraft are 



a regular air ser- 
vice will be estab- 
lished over 







put is the transport of sick people from 



remote districts to 




or centres 



where treatment can be given. In Australia 
splendid work is being done in this con- 
nection by Australian Aerial Medical 
Services, and the D.H, "Fox Moth" 
employed until recently by this organisation 

made 53 such flights in three years. It has 
been succeeded by a larger and more 






when they flew non-stop from Moscow to 
San Jacinto, California, 6,305 miles. Bad 






weather defeated the British fliers, however, 

and they had to land for fuel at Alexander 
Bay, near the mouth of the Orange River, 

thus failing by about 300 miles to set up a 

new record. They had the satisfaction of 

beating the world's seaplane long-distance 
record of 5,219.8 miles achieved last March 
by a Dormer Do 18 flying boat, which flew 
from off Start Point, Devon, to Caravellas, 

480 miles from Rio de Janeiro. The boat 
made the flieht in 43 hrs. 



route. This service will form 
section of the company's pro 
Atlantic air service 




first 
South 







way of Bathurst, 



on the west coast of Africa. 

■ • ■ 

British Airways have now ordered two 






liner 









more Lockheed 1 4s. This modern type of air 

is also becoming popular in other 

countries, and a fleet of 11 has been de- 

M 

live red to the Royal Dutch Air Lines, of 

Amsterdam, and its associate company 
Royal Netherlands Indian Air Lines, of 

Batavia. Five of the machines were shipped 
to Java for the latter company. 



622 



THE MECCANO MAGAZINE 




□□□□□□□□D 

□ 

D 






Trip in a 





Steamer 



□ 
□ 

D 



By O. S. Nock, B.Sc, A.M.I.Mech.E. 




D 





TAFFA and Iona — two names as closely linked in travellers' 
minds as Dover and Calais; vet what an odd association they 
makel Staff a is a tiny uninhabited islet barely a square mile in area, 
and boasting some of the most amazing cliff scenery in the British 
Isles, Tts wonders remained unknown to the world at large until it 
was "discovered" in 1772 bv an English traveller, whereas the fame 



but now, when the high-pressure boilers have been removed and 
five out of the seven turbines take live steam at 200 lb. per sq. in. # 

the arrangement seems odd in the extreme 



The 




IS now 




d with one double-ended 




manne 



of 




dates almost 




from the dawn of our 

Yet see nit ally 

Jona might easily 

. It was not 

until Macbravne's ves- 



boiler steaming at 200 lb. per sq. in., and no little ingenuity was 
displayed in adapting the seven original turbines to work satis- 
factorily with the alter- 
ed steam raising plant. 








to plv the 

sounds and fiords of 

the Western Isles 

i 

the caves and cliffs of 

Staffa, and the ancient 

cathedral of Iona, be- 
came linked within the 
compass of a day's 

tour from Oban. 
In recent years a con 



siderable 




of 




have worked on 

service. There was 



th e ill- 




i t 



Grena- 



dier, 



> • 



a sturdy paddle 



boat very similar in 
outward appearance to 

the famous " C olttmha .' " 




It was done by a com- 

, * * mt 1 * 



parativelv small modi- 
fication to the turbine 




I should men- 
tion that the turbines 



were built 



by 



the 




Parsons Ma rim.' Steam 
Turbine Co. Ltd., of 
Waltsend. The total 

horse -power is 
and this is de- 
veloped at the unusual- 
ly high propeller speed 
of 570 r.p.m. The one- 
time high-pressure tur- 
bine, and the first two 
turbines on each shaft. 



run at tf.OUO r.p.m 
But 



The twin-screw turbine steamer "King George V*' in Oban Bay. This vessel was built in 1926, and was the first 

high-pressure turbine steamer in the world. 



vesi 




although the 

remains some- 
what of a curiosity as 

far as her machinery is 



The "Grenadier" was destroyed by fire, and pending the completion 
of a new ship the veteran "Fusilier" undertook the run. Then came 
the Diesel-electric "Lochfym," which has figured in several of my 
Scottish sea trips. Finally, when the Williamson-Buchanan fleet 

into that of Macbrayne, the "LocJifyne" was 






became mer 




concerned, she has rendered excellent service, first on the Clyde. 
and then under the Macbrayne flag. On my trip she was commanded 
by Captain McKechnic, and the machinery was in charge of Chief 
Engineer MacGregor. 

isolated grey clouds 



It was a 




colourless morni 




and 



transferred to the Fort William run and the Mull and Iona service 
taken up by the twin-screw turbine steamer "Ming George V," It 



sky suggested squalls 

9.5 a.m., and were soon 




along under a generally overcast 



way. We left 




punctually at 




nm 




was in the latter that I made 




most interesting voyage 



■ • 



The "King George. V" was built in 1926, when engineers all over 
the world, on both land and sea. were going in for higher steam 
pressures m an attempt to secure greater efficiency. "King George V 
was fitted experimentally with boilers steaming at 550 lb, persq, in., 
and was the very first hi gh -pressure 

turbine steamer in the world. 
T am indebted to her builders, 
Wi 1 1 ia m I >enn v and Brothers 1 A < I . , 

- 

of Dumbarton, for particulars of 

the interesting layout of machinery 

There were two 









as 

Yarrow water-tube boilers, fitted 
with superheaters, and also with 

air heaters in the uptakes to heat 

the air on the way to the grates. 
The degree of superheat attained., 

wever not 



750 deg, F., was 



ho 
h 



unusually high; such a figure is 

often attained in modern tyjes of 
locomotives in combination with 
boiler pressures of 250 lb. per. 
sq. in. or so. 

As I shall explain in a moment, 

the steam-raising plant has under- 
gone several changes, but the original layout of turbines remains. 




across the Firth of Lome, 

the faint musical purr of the turbines. The lighthouse at the 
southernmost point of Lis more Island gleamed whiter than ever 
against the grev-green of the sea; we passed very close and then 
entered the Sound of Mull. The Gaelic word of which "Mull" is a 

means ''a mass of hill," and from this viewpoint 

the description suits perfectly; as 
far as the eye could see grey-brown 
ranges rose one behind each other 
like the waves of the sea. By now 
an ancient fortress, perched com- 



phonetic ren 





tmg 



o u t 




1 1- 



mantlingly on a cape 

into the sound, was a stri 

object on our port beam; this was 

Duart Castle, the ances 

of the Chief of the Clan Maclean. 

Not long ago it was little more than 





a picturesque ruin, but through the 
ctire and enterprise of the late 

Chieftain, who lived to be over 100 
years of age, the castle has been 
completely restored. 



Steaming up the sound, several 



i.ma Cathedral, This photograph and the upper one on the opposite page are by 

H. Black, Glasgow. 



other West Hi 




and 



s 




aim 





were 



seen in 



aeration. 



. 



It is in some respects rather peculiar. On boll 



i 




starboard and the 



port side there is a set of three turbines, geared by single reduction 
on to the propeller shaft. Then, on the port side only, there is in 
addition the special high-pressure turbine. In the original arrange- 
ment there was thus a total of one high -pressure, four intermediate- 

the 




pressure, and two low-pressure turbines. In order to ec 
power on the two propeller shafts the intermediate and low-pressure 
turbines were designed to use a larger proportion of the steam 
passing from the high-pressure turbine. Purely from the point of 



The tiny little steamer "Princess 
Louise/' little bigger than a naval pinnace, came speeding along 
bound for Oban, after having called at small piers serving outlying 
districts. She had hardly gone wlnn a conspicuous patch of starlet 
against the tawny hills of the mainland showed the whereabouts ol 
another unit of the lleet. This turned out to be the cruising vessel 
"Lorhgarry," berthed alongside the pier at Loclialine. In the course 
of a seven davs' cruise from Glasgow she works her way right up the 



> 
west coast to Lochinver, 




shire. Lochaliin- as seen 



view of appearance this original layout looked s 




from tin* mail steamer is a charming place. The steamboat pier 
and the village lie on the Sound of Mull at the entrance to the " 




at lop- 





this entrance is 




narrow, but 




the loch 



* 



* 



* 



■ 







f 






* 



THE 




MAGAZINE 





out into quite a spacious sheet of water, ringed with 
trees, and lying snugly among the mountains. 

Meanwhile we were forging away into rough weather, Even in 
this sheltered reach there was a great wind going, and low clouds 





were just glancing the summits of Mull's highest mountains 
But while the hills of the mainland appeared as little but grey 
shapes, lessening in depth as the distance increased, on the port 
side we were skirting one of those surprising belts of woo 
and luxuriant vegetation that one 
finds in sheltered corners of the 
West Highlands; this was Calve 
Island, lying so close to the shore 

as to appear part of Mull. 

And now the "King George V" 
was turning and entering the bay 
of Tobermory. This little port, the 
metropolis of Mull, is typical of 
many settlements in the Western 

. A craggy knoll guards the 

entrance, and a line of low cliffs 

continue round the semi-circle of 



The Sound of Iona was in 




a haven on this rough day. 



K ing 




old houses, shops, dwellings. 




the tne\ 




inns, one of these 



bearing the odd name of the district 
in which Tobermory is situated 
Mishnish. The new pier buildings, 
square and sever- in white-washed 
concrete, bring a striking touch of 

modernity to what otherwise would 
be a very old-world scene. We -were 
off again at about 10.40 a.m., with 




While the mails and daily newspapers were put a shore the 
George V" lay at anchor in the clearest of green water, and passen- 
gers visited the 1,400-year-old shrine of St. Columba, The cathedral 
which has been beautifully restored, is cruciform in plan, simply 
and ruggedly built, yet sheltered from the worst weather by 
a rough hillock lying just to the west. It was built in 1203, some 
600 years after Columba 's day, by the Lord of the Isles, and located 

on the site of 
the ancient monastery. Across the 




exa 




Sound one 




see the road bv 



which pilgrims came to Iona before 



the 







of 




a roac 1 



that, after traversing miles of 
austere glen, moorland and coast, 

ends on the charming silver-white 
sands of the Ross of Mull, 



I hit the 




was passing. 



and there are timetables even in so 



o u t - o f - tl lc -world a 




nee as Iona.. 



So, down the hill again. But there 
was time for k look at the wayside 
crosses that embody some 

_ 




qmsitc examples of Celtic sculptural 



irt; they are 




far tl 



li- 




st 



Christian monuments on the island, 
and are said to date from the 

ninth or tenth century. Back at 



Joining the ferryboat at Iona. In the background is Fionphort Mull, 



the landing 




en 



h*J 



I 



on a s 



mail 




of I 




of civilisation, and the broadening 





rain in the wind, and each 
gust making louder music in the rigging. Across the widening 

, the mainland of I n v erne ss- shire appeared as a 
tumbled wilderness of barren rocks. It seemed like the very end 

of grey-green sea, 
covered with white breakers, only heightened the general effect, 

ainst the wild array of hills to the north, now seen tapering 

down to the Point of Ardnarnurchan, a little ship was passing. 

asses revealed once again the scarlet funnel, and I recognised 

She is a sister ship 
nuor, in which I made 

"M.M," for April and May 1937. The 
was en route from Locliboisdale to Oban, and had called at Castlebay 
in Barra, and the dead flat islands of Tiree and Coll. As I watched 



» 



JU 



the squat distinctive lines of the "LocJmtrn 





the 




■ ■ 



shipped m 
ng 






V, 




boat in readiness for going 

3.30 p.m. we were off again, next call Oban. 

We emerged from the Sound into wild seas, and skirting a coast 
as devoid of vegetation as the Outer Hebrides. Here too, although 
we were no longer catching the Atlantic rollers, one could not help 
admiring the fine seamanship that took us comfortably through 



a 




a re M 




1 1 




to the "L 

described in the 




trip to the Outer Hebrides 

"Lot he am" 



where currents run strong and the sea 
was extremely choppy. I joined the first officer for a short time on 
the bridge. Like all vessels built for service on the Clyde the "King 




xmrm 





her, a mere toy 



ship, 

amid 
seas towards Kil- 

choan, she seemed to 






Georg& V" has a bridge quite devoid of shelter 

hardihood of the men who navigate their ships from such an 
exposed place it seems a rather curious tradition on waterways 

where inclement weather is the rule rather than the exception. It 
probably dates from the time of the intense competition when rivals 

would race one another 



moving 



slowly 




em 





all 




at is ad- 







urous 

r est 



and romantic 



sea- 




in 

faring. 

By this time we were 
rounding the northwest 
corner of Mull. Although 

a bare six miles away, 
Coll looked no more than 
a faint pencil-stroke on 
the grey western horizon. 



The 

plunged 



Kivn 




v n 



and reared on 



her way, A wild reef, 

the Treshnish Isles, lav 

, and 




on our port 

ahead of us was an isolat- 
ed black rock, its modest 



summit nearly lost in 

driving sea mist. I looked 

at 





incredulous 

Could this mere shape 



was 

-Staifa! 





piers; an 



ab 



unobstructed 







look out all round was 
then necessary in order 

to avoid all 
of collision. 

We were now ma king a 
course due east. The rain 
coming up from the west 

* - J J. 

however proved a well- 

mqli impcni.'trable cur- 
tain and hid from our 



view the isles lying just 

to the south; for a few 
moments there was a 



f ai n t gl i m pse of Colon say. 




of the 



high 




tains of Jura there was 
not a sign, and ahead of 
us there might have been 
a hundred miles of ocean. 
With the rain coming on 

harder than ever, and the 

far away clanging of the 



. 



Tobermory seen from the "King George V.'* This little port is the metropolis of the island of Mull. 



less lump of an islet be the renowned object of our journey? It 

" an hour or so before we dre\ abeam, and right up to 



was 




confess I did not stay on tlv 

■ ■ 



stewards bell ringing 
passengers to tea I must 



the last minute she remained an enigma. 7 





stopped, and the ship turned a point or two to 
stupendous south face of the island was revealed. 



Unfortunately it was far too rough to land, but in 



as the engines 

the 



We steamed on in a deluge, and for an hour or more 



exposed bridge for longl 

e hi" 





cliffs 





of the south coast of Mull passed in fascinating procession before the 
saloon windows. At the Carsaig Arches fragments of loose cloud 

were drifting vertically up the crags; the green flanks of the Loch 



■ 



minutes the "Ming George V" lay off we were able to drink in 
the splendour of caves like some vast irregular Gothic archways, 
and to see the strange geometrical perfection of the basalt pillars 

wn into bold relief where the rock was covered with primrose- 





yellow 




r + 





in 







of the rain, the roar of the 



<ut of the caves, and the ceaseless crv of the 



r. 



sulls, all added their quota to the scene of unexam riled grandeu 
But the telegraph was ringing, and we were soon on a southward 
courjye again, with Iona some six miles ahead. 



Buie mountains loomed out of the mist, and then vanished again 
The sea grew calmer, land was glimpsed to starboard, and we were 

soon passing up the Sound of Kerrera. The green dripping woods and 

and then the sight of yachts and other craft lying 

bay, were indeed a contrast to what we had 
seen that day west of Mull, 

ith drifters getting up steam in the harbour, and 
paddle steamer "Momikiineer" bustling off on some short 

np to the 



mo 









, we rimnceu 
six o'clock we were 




rth Pier, and at a little after 









MECCANO MAGAZINE 





H K Thames lighterman is often known as a "Charlie." 



■ ■ 

w 




or, if 






work is done in the docks, as a 



□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□ED 
ass i- plaa-l between 1 the double hitts for lifting the 



it 



poker," from his 




of -working barges about the 
basins by poking and pushing with an oar or a hitcher. He 

is a familiar enough figure on the river, but Londoners 

■ 



anchor that is often carried. A head fast, or length of rope 

ed to a short chain, is situated at the extreme head 
of the barge and is used as a mooring rope. Oars or sweeps, 




know very little of his work or the trade he is engaged in. 



Lighterage indeed is a form of transport that on the whole 




often 




to 



attracts very 




attention, but the men in it form the 



largest group of workers on the river and the trade is 

much of the e;irriage of £»■!>< >ds up ami 

and between the various 




down 
The 



re 







9,000 







a cylindrical lifebuoy, and a 

the "spear and brake," are additional equipment carrie< 





lighter in general use has a regis 




from 70 to 100, but there 
"punts" of 20 or 30 ton 



tonnage ot 







* 






small 

ot her 




or 



more 



lighters of 500 tons t hat are in use in the lower parts of the 

ieir own special types of craft, 



river. Various trades 






e 7d 




-gallon 



lighters on the Thames, and the 

use of such a large number is 

that the 

Port of London, despite its great 



explained by the 





ware- 



chain of docks, quav 

house accommodation, is pre- 

eminent! \ 

where 



;tn 



over sic 






on 
















port. 

ship's 
to or from 





lighters, both in the docks 

the river, rather than to or from 
quay or 





g 




are 



then towed, or otherwise worked 

inter- 
of the 




to 

mediate 



m 





or 









m 






port. In addition London has a 

ge transhipment trade, 
goods to and from all parts of the 

world pass through the port in 
the course of their journey. 
It must be admitted 




dumb barges or lighters, always 
termed craft by river workers, 

are -extremely prosaic in appear- 

little more shape than 

box. There is 
rather more in their construction 
than a casual glance reveals, h 









^ 







the petrol and oil 



such as 
barges 

companies, and the 

lighters used for the transport 




of imported meat 






The predecessors of 




n 




ti'n 



were ex- 




on 



the 



lighterman 
n um er ou s 

Thames during the 

17th centuries and in the vear 











1600 the names of 40,000 Water- 
men were on the Rolls of the 
Watermen's Company, these all 
finding employment on the river 



in the carnage of both passengers 




They were a some- 



obstructive 




of 



workers, objecting to many im- 
provements of the age, not only 



on the 




itself 




Upon the 



i 



but 





uc t i on 
of hackney coaches in the City 

complained that 



streets 





- 



passenger 




* 



on w 




was 




the great thoroughfare 

London, would 




Barges locked out of the Royal Docks boing taken over bv lugs. These lug* 

fetch and carry for the big" ships and art- in effect the lorries of the river. 



Photograph by Stanley. 






rever. 



A barge 



is 



built 






either of timber or steel, mostly the latter nowadays; 




m us t 






constructed, both to stand up to the 
h handling of the tugs and to sustain the stresses, or 

The 



callv cease. Later the earlv steam 

passenger boats were to provide 
a further cause of grievance. 



li 



At the present time there are between 6,000 and 7,000 



watermen, lightermen and bargemen, including 




rou CT 
"wringing/' 



set up when 



majority of lighters are s 






g on an uneven 
, having instead an over- 
inging swim head like that of a pleasure punt. The stem, 
although of similar construction, has an addition in the 
shape of a vertical centre board or plate called a "budget, 



>> 




assists in keeping the vessel on 





urse 



apprentices, at work on the river. Of these 500 are purelv 

- _ M 




m 







i > i ! 







s mo 






■ fa- 

most of their work is dependent 
in the river and they wait on crews and 




others, ferrying them between ship and shore 



a I 



so respons 






actual mooring 
when a ship ties up at her buoy. 

There are 5,000 lightermen, most of whom 





both 



while in tow. The sides slope slightly inward down to the 



flat bottom, 




is most of the deck is taken up by the 



hatch, only a narrow gunwale runs along each side of tha 
hatch coamings, A cabin aft provides accommodation for 



the li 




and a stove is also li 




except in craft 
carrying dangerous or inflammable freights such as petrol. 



At the head of the barge are placed either single 



or 



double bitts, which are stout posts taking the tow-rope. A 



watermen's and lightermen's licences, which are earned 
during an apprenticeship of between five and seven v 

V-or- jMm * Jl ^|l 




according to the age on taking out indentures. At the end 



of the first two years apprentices able to pass an inter- 




e examination, are granted a Two 

ii i ■ n <■ 




* 



ears 




ce 



whichallows them tonavigate craft under a Freeman. At the 
close of t he full period the passing of a further examination 



secures for the apprentice the Freemanship of the Water- 



men's Company, and he in his 




can engage apprentices. 



v 



* 



W 



> 



THE MECCANO MAGAZINE 




- 



a 



f. 



c 



« 




r ery year five or six lightermen who have com 




their term of apprenticeship during the preceding 
months enter for Doggett's Coat and Badge Race, sculling 



maximum tow, but only four petrol-laden tank barges are 



between London Bridge and Chelsea for the honour of 
winning the orange coat and silver arm badge presented 
annually from a fund left for the purpose by Mr, Thomas 




Mr. 
of c 





who was 




actor, chose this 



allowed. Some tugs work only daily tides, while others are 
24-hour boats, being double manned and working all tides 

of work is under- 
however, and the 



except Sundays. Quite a fail 

l _ l r' rf^W^ 

en without the services t 




% 





m an 




navi 







> rat me 












t> 



the accession of George 



I of Hanov 



to 




his barge up or downstream 
with the tide by the aid of his 30-ft. oars or sweeps. Not a 

little skill is required in 
avoiding other 



English Throne in 1714 



b 




■hich 



» 







ed in early August 
taken place every year 
since, with a few excep- 
tions, and until about 
25 or 30 years 





Lry 



watermen 
re used . T 



day the men row in 
regulation racing skirts. 
but thev still row their 



race among 



all 



the 



other river traffic, con- 
tending with the wasli 

negotiat- 







and in working t hrough 

the arches of bridges. 

into 

is 

often a cause of loss of 
temper to the masters 
of other vessels. 

arlie' 1 makes 




e ver^ 



* 




us< 



of 



tidal currents, and day 
or night he can 



hi 



s 




craft 

of 











- 



where he 
wants it, but if he does 

occasional] v find him- 
self athwart the piers of 




f 



"liic Die*<!i-eJtt:iric tug "Lectro" wita barges in tow in Chelsea Reach. 






may be met with on 



the 



course. 



type of lighterman is a boatswain, who 
takes over craft from the tugs either at the wharf or at 

* 

adjacent barge roads, where they remain until needed. In 




well 



a 




him 



through. Incidentally, he becomes a target for missiles o 
all kinds hurled by small boys leaning over the parapets of 

I know still broods darkly 



bridges, and 

over the thrower of 



one lighterman 



many cases the boatswain drifts them to the wharf when 
the tide serves. He also arranges their mooring and gener- 



;l huge 



vegetable marrow that 











aring them for unloading, 



and 



just missed hitting him on the head. 



The lighterage trade has a language of its own. A man on 






to be taken away by the tugs when empty. A roadsman 




and 



has somew 








duties when 




are 



at barge 



roads or tiers, then keeping watch on mooring ropes and 
pu 




morning duty says that he is on "early shoot, 
duty he reh-rs to as "tidgin/' When he navigates a 

he is "driving/' and 



up along" or "down along 



he sometimes classes himself and his associates as ''rowers 






Church Hole 

over, and many of them 



the bilges of craft when necessary. 
s or tiers have such names as Bugsby's Hole, 



accommodate 



100 



or 



more craft. Thev are the 






river 





and towers:" the latter group are not the most efficient 
and are not entrusted with a driving job. A barge immedi- 
ately at the wharf side is 
"in the parlour/' while 
all craft lying outside 
this one 
second 




cilities for craft that 

be got on the 
shore, or "hard," during 
neap titles through lack 
of water. The craft at 
these roads must be well 

secured, and the "collar" 





- 

strain, is often equipped 







o r 



third 






"bottom" as the case 

may be. 

erman's 
















prov 




its 



can 

own hazards and need 
less to say a steady head 
is a very necessary attri- 



bute 



when 




threatens. 






More 



than 



one man has had to take 
a sudden dive overboard 




uurnrieji driving a barge witn tne aid ol uars or sweeps 3U it. in lengtn. 










1 en 




__ _ 




I 



i 





i 




avv 




to 






s breaking adrift. 




Sometimes the shore is covered by deep mud that will 



hold a barge fast, causing it to fill when the tide rises. 
Again, a lighter will at times slide down a sloping shore on 
the mud. breaking its mooring ropes in doing so. A "Inter" 

job of keeping the shore clean, pushing the mut 

- . 4 * * ... «■ . -m i ■» * *■ * 



his craft out of a ship's way, one a short time ago taking 
such a course when a collier rammed and sank his barge. 

some anxious moments 



Recently two lightermen 







when the contents of their vessel caught fire while it was in 





t> 



awav 



with 



a long pole that 




a board similar to a 



squeegee at its end. Barge beds of chalk and camps beds 



with timber edges are sometimes constructed to allow the 
barere to rest flat, and where the shore is some distance 

the quay a half- tide dock keeps the barge at a con- 
venient working height during times of low water. 
Six barges in three ranks of two each make up a tug's 



tow. On another occasion a lighterman stepping from one 
of the barges on to the tug's deck missed his footing and 
fell between the tug's stern and the swims of his own craft. 

Fortunately the skipper with great presence of mi 












ring 




S engineer for 



** 





* 




have remained under the barges, 

going, with the result 

astern 

rounded up and picked him up 




man would 

he 





und 



er the six craft, w 



the lighterman was washed 




eupon 




tug 




626 



THE MECCANO MAGAZINE 










Making a River Navigable 



X)t 



Until 1930 the River Nene 



a 



Northamptonshire and Fenland river, was 

in D bad state, the channel 

being narrow and silted up 
in many places, causing 



pipelines to the " 

land surrounded by a 




»• 




This is a piece of 



which the mud 



water 






running 



10 ft. high on 
was allowed to settle, the 
off into the river. When 






Safeguarding a Great Dam 




great 



c ".rand 




Dam, that is 



being constructed across the Columbia 




iver 




uent floods. I n that year 

the River Nene Catchment 
Board took over control, and 
commenced its work bv 

1 " ■ .^m 

making a complete survey of 

river. An improvement 




scheme was drawn 



the 






with 



sources. 




up, 



but 




could do li 

own limited re- 
i 1935 a Govern- 



ment 



grant 



was 




a i n ed , 



however, 




work was 



started in earnest. 

rovements 





eon 



Peterborough and 





many 
locks, and the widening and 

straightening of the channel. 
This is being carried out * 

the Board itself, and will 
make the river between the 

■ 

towns named navigable for 

all craft of the standard canal type. 

The scheme 




Valley 

is being made 



in 




■ 



bv actually 



with what 



♦* 



twist 



< 




is 



crack proof 

providing it 
are k nown as 

gaps." When the 

the 



completed, 






enormous quantity of water 
held up behind it mav exert 

sufficient pressure to cause 



the structure to 



• r 



gi ve 



r - 



and possibly put a crack 



through 



the middle. 




ri ght 

To control this treme 

force and to prevent it from 
doing serious damage 



running 

of 




length 



the 




6 ft. wide and 
width and 
dam are 

concrete. 
fi 1 1 ed te mporarii y w i t h s a nd , 

is to be removed 





w 




A 95 h.p. Caterpillar Tractor sunk almost to its axles in soft gravel hauling a Le Tourneau cable-operated 
scraper excavator during the construction of a large reservoir in England. Photograph bv courtesv 

of Jack Olding and Co. Ltd.. London. 



and replaced by 
as soon as it is 



established that the "give 





I 





improvements below 

involved more special ised 
contracts were awarded to 

te concerns. It involved the dredging 

the 30 miles of 
river below Peterborough; the piling of the 
river banks for a distance of two miles 

.■> i i ■ 

above Wisbech Bridge; the building of 



wont 



p n va 

and widening of most of 



full it was left to dry, and in a few years 
may be put under cultivation. 

scheme was 

the first coastal vessel success- 
ascended the river to Peter borough. 



been taken up. 
The Grand Coulee 




Shortly after the 





was a 250-ton ship, and loaded creosote 

at Peterborough. The Jock and sluices 



is said to be the first built On this principle, 

France to Build 280-Mile Pipeline for Oil 



A great oil pipeline 



280 miles in 



length 



is to be built in France. It will run from 

Donges, a small port near the naval base of 
St. Na zaire, to oil reservoirs at Montargis, 



280 miles away in 




interior of the 



locks and sluices at I )og-in-a-Doublet 
seven miles downstream from Peter- 
borough, making this the tidal limit of 
the river; and the rebuilding of two 

wtiich were so low that boats 

■ 

could not pass at high tide. 

The (hedging scheme was com - 





l recently. More than three years 
were spent in the work, and in all I! 
million eu. yds. of material were re- 
moved from a stretch of river 25 miles 
in length. The contractors used bucket 
dredgers, driven by steam and Diesel 

engines, and Diesel draglines. An end- 




discharged 




chain of buckets removed the mud 
from the river and discharged it into 
hopper barges, which were 

powerful tugs to suction 

where the spoil was 
deposited on land. 

The suction dredgers, one of which is 
shown in the lower illustration on this 
page, were equipped with powerful pumps 

and Diesel engines and 

was 




country* The pipe will be completely 
underground, at a depth of about 3 ft', 



and will have a 




of 




12 in. It will run through the Loire 
Valley, one of the areas of France most 
easily defended from attacks by 
enemy aircraft, and large secret under- 
ground reservoirs w ill be constructed 

at various points. The reservoirs will 

have a capacity of about seven million 
tons, which is the 




. ■ 

peace- 
annual oil consumption of France, 

A. 




An Under-water Power Station 

. • . 

A new hydraulic power station, in 



w h i c h 




generating 




mery is 



One of the powcrtul suction dredgers used in the work of making the 
Kivcr Nene navigable, which is described on this page. Photograph 




driven bv steam ana JJtesel engines 

an auxiliary pump. The latter 
used to force a jet uf watfcr into the barge. 

bv 

the main suction 



■J 

the diluted spoil then bein 




re mo 




pump and forced along 



by H. van Oosterom. Wisbech. 

at Dog-in -a-Doublet were officially opened 
in 

been rebuilt. 



under water, was placed in service 
recently in Germany. The station is the 
second ol this type in Germanv, and is 
located in the River Iller, near Augs- 
burg, Bavaria. The plant consists of 



four lO.OOO-li.]). turbines, built into the 



Juh 




and one of the bridges lias 



It is hoped that when the scheme is com- 

a busy trade will be developed by 







means of the River Nene 

H, van Oosterom 







tsbech) 



p i pes throu gh 

cing the 
manner consit 







flows. Bv 

under water in this 

>le saving in construction 



time and in material is elfected owing to the 



elimination of 




usual machine house , 



barrage and by- pass canal for shipping, 

necessary on navigable rivers. 




v 



i 



L» 



» 





MAGAZINE 



627 



c 



* 



' 



' 



A Mobile Shovel Excavator 






Th 

shows 



upper 






specially 

point 




Allen 

and 

Allen 





on this 
mobile excavator 

mo ved from 

'hways at a 
It is known as the 



Oil in Scotland 



■ 



An 










Duty Shovel, 



Drilling at the experimental test well of 

the Anglo-Am- n can Oil Co. Ltd,, at 

Dalkeith, Midlothian, has now reached a 
depth of 3,857 ft. where tests showed the 
presence of natural gas. Small quantities of 



A new 




e of electric saw, which cuts 



all kinds of metals and alloys, is now being 



made in the United States 



Electric 





the Miller 



tiring 



device consists of a 



Companv, 






product 



Sons 




strongly 



. _ 



ey, Oxford. 

The machine comprises a 

special 

motor chassis 
turntable, on which are 
mounted the digging: me- 
chanism and shovel arm 



constructed 

with a. 








for travelling dig- 
tfinj,', and rotating the turn- 
table is supplied by either an 
oil or a petrol engine, which 

is mounted under the bonnet 
of 






in the usual 
The bucket has a 



of 




cu. yd. If 



desired the shovel arm can 
be replaced by a special 
lattice boom and equipment 




ine o 



for 

- ■ 

the machine 

converted for use as a 






crane or as 




shovel . 

Plan to Bridge the Ribble 






steel blade. 




% 



■which are set a 

number of small teeth. When 

the saw is in action a 

controlled electric are leaps 
ahead of it and heats a 



narrow 




on 



of 



me 



tal 



a few thousandths of an 
inch wider than the Hade. 



This 



has 



the 



effect 






of 



reducing the metal to a 

molten or plastic condition. 

The blade therefore has no 
actual cutting to do; it 

e the 




si in pi y su 








softened metal and acts as 



a n electrode 




the 
' ' j u tnps 




f > 



-generating 



which 
arc 



to the work. A 



specially-built welding trans- 




rmer is u 




to 




pro v 

current of suitable voltage 

amperage to melt the 
tvpe of metal to be cut. 

m I 

Elevator Inside a Mountain 




Visitors 



to 



White face 



Estuary 

Various plans for bridging 



■ 

The Allen mobile mechanical excavator described on this page loading material into a lorry for rem ova]. 

Photograph by courtesy of John Allen and Sons [Oxford) Ltd., Cowley, Oxford* 



Mountain in northern New 






the estuary <*l the River Kibble have been 
considered in the past, but none of them 
has so far been adopted- Recently a new 

has been put forward by Alderman 
C. \\\ l ruin, Lytham St. Annes. His plans 
provide for a roadway and dam across the 










estuary from Crossens, near Southport, 

tarn Pier, which would shorten the 



to 





resent route 



alon<* 



10 miles. The 



r* 



y 

be 42 ft. 



pro 

and 40 ft. 



the ^Lancashire coast 

dam would 




high 

concrete cone 
lock system 




wide, with re 








sluice gates, 

would allow 



sluppmg to pass up the Kibble to Preston. 
The estimated cost of 

the scheme is about 

10,(100,000. 

Air Raid Protection for 

Oil Depot 

An interesting 
scheme has been evolv- 



oil have been found at depths between 
1,733 and 1,760 ft., and tests of this gave a 

yield of 12 per cent, petrol and 12 percent, 
kerosene. At present the well is capable of 
producing Irotn eight ; Hi barrels of t.rud.- 

oil daily, and in an effort to increase the 
flow 500 lb. of explosive have been fired 

at the level of the oil-bearing sands, 



York State can now reach 

the summit bv means of an 



elevator that works in a vertical shaft con- 
structed i\\ the heart of the mountain. The 
shaft is 271 ft. in height and its lower end is 



reached from a tunnel, the 







to 



which is 




at the terminus of an 



Further tests will be made as soon as the 



well has 




cleaned out. 



A Highway with Coloured Traffic Lanes 

a mile in 
length at Ewell. Surrey, is being widened 



A. section of a highway 




existing roadway up the mountain. The road 
ends at a point 273 ft. below the summit, 

and before the elevator scheme was com- 

pitted the climb from there to the.top of the 

had to be made by foot up a 

pathway and a series of steps, 

A New Fire Hose Ramp 
Road traffic in the vicinity of a fire often 





is interrupted 






ed by C. C. Wakefield 

and Co. Ltd. to protect 
30 oil ' ' 

depot 

air attack. Each of 
tanks contains 12, 




their 
fro m 









allons of oil, and they 



are 



nil 




in the 



same area. A circular 



concrete saucer 4 ft. 
deep is to be construct-* 
ed around the tanks, 



it will be supported 




la vi in 



IT 



of 




the 



across 




. 



the roads. With the 





South Wales 



Protection 



En- 



gineers Ltd., Cardiff, 



have 



produced 



the 



"Bain-Bridge" 








m 












A special hose ramp designed to allow vehicles to proceed freely in the neighbourhood oi a lire. Photograph by 

courtesy of The South Wales Fire Protection Engineers Ltd., Cardiff, , 



lower illustration on 

this page. This consists 

of units or 

each of which is tested 

- - 

to withstand a pressure 
of over eight tons, and 

two or more of which 

assembled to 
form a complete ramp 





8 ft 



bv ea 



hworks. If a tank is wrecked by a 



— w 

omb in the event of an air raid the oil will 



■ 




into the saucer, from which it can . 



be pumped later. 



A Giant Astronomical Clock 



\n astronomical c 




. 



appro xi 

has 







■ 

that weighs 

two tons and has 93 dials, 

Antwerp to the United 
States of America in readiness for exhibition 
at the great New York World's Fair, which 
is to be opened next year. It was made by 

lis Zimmer, Lierre, Belgium, and 



M. 




is one of the finest of its type yet built. 



from 20 ft. to 44 ft. The new road is to have 



two carriageways 




a central 



dividing 
strip, and each carriageway will be separ- 
ated into two traffic lanes. The surfaces of 
the near-side traffic lanes will be colours I 
red and those of the off-side Or overtaking 

■ 

strip, which also will be red, will be treated 
as a danger zone, to be left clear except in 

cases of emergency, The colours applied to 
the concrete will be indelible, and if the 

experiment is successful the idea will 



rules, will In- white. The central dividing 




6 in. in 




lit its 
an- indicated by red discs, which fit into 



sockets projecting from the end sections; and 

at night the discs are replaced by continuous 

or flashing lights. The ramp shown in the 
accompanying illustration is fitted with a 



day signal at one end and a ti ashing night 



signal, at 




other. 



no 






doubt be adopted in the construction of 

new roads. 



A modified form of ramp is provided for 
carria *e on fire-engines on whic h the stowage 
space is limited. This consists of two parts of 
tiiree units each connected by parallel tie 
rods, a central section of hose 2 ft. 



6 in. 




in 




remaining uncovered. 






.' 



6 



i 





MECCANO MAGAZINE 














nnnnnaDnDaDDnnnnnnnannnnnnnnnnnnnDDnaaDDDDnnnnnnnnnnannnnnnnnDnna 
□ 

□ 

R 

a 
a 

□ 

DDDaDDDDDDnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnaDnDanannnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnn 



a 
a 





R.A 



• 




♦ 






□ 

□ 



T^HE quantity production of equipment for the greatly enlarged 



X R.A.F. has now 




in in earnest, and aero engines and military 





aeroplanes are coming from the huge factories created 
Government Aircraft Shadow Factory scheme, as well as from those 
of regular aircraft producers. The aircraft that are being produced in 

numbers 
"Hurricane 




e 



include 



the 



■ 

landing light* The wing centre section is a se 



bolted to the fuselage at 




r points. Ailerons 




unit, 




nd 



is 





Haw 




.• I 






single- 



seater fighter and the Hand ley 

Page "Hampden" and Fairey 

M1 *~ ****** bombers, and these 





are 







in 



three 

this articl 

The chief requirement of a 

fighter aeroplane is speed, and 

"Hurricane," illus- 
trated on this page, is one of the 
fastest aircraft of its type in the 
world. Early this year several 

very fast flights were made be- 



p 






reen i\orthoIt aerodrome and 

"Hurricanes" 




rgh by 



of 
(Fighter) Squadron, 

Iv.A.F. On one such flight made 

by the aircraft in formation the 
327 miles were flown in 65 min., 

■ 

at an average 




of 301.8 
m.p.h. A more notable achieve- 
ment was a flight by one "Hurri- 
cane" from Turn house aero.- 
drome, Edinburgh, to Noriholt 
aerodrome, in 48 min., at the re- 

markablv high average speed of 

408.75 m.p.h. This is the highest 
speed ever attained by a land- 
plane. The aeroplane was piloted by 
Gillan, Commander of the Squadron 





fitted to the 

trailing edge of the outer portion of each wing, and hydraulically- 

s to the inner portion. They are called split 
only the under part of the wing acts as a flap. 

The undercarriage is retract- 
able, and when the aeroplane 
is in flight the wheels are drawn 
inward and up into recesses in 
the underside of the wing centre 

ion. The apertures are then 

closed automa 

the outside of the 

undercarriage, thus preserving 
the perfectly smooth surface of 
the wing. If the hydraulic gear 
that operates the undercarriage 
should fail, there is an arrange- 
ment of cocks by which the 

pilot can relieve the pressure in 

and re- 









hydraulic syst 
lease the catches that hold the 
retracted wheels in place. The 

weight of the wheels will then 




down the undercarriage. 
The cockpit is fully enclosed, 




Hawker "Hurricane" 8-gun single-sealer hgiiters of No. 1U (l-ignter) Squauton, R.A.F., 
flying in formation. The illustrations on this page and the lower one on the opposite page 

are by courtesy of "Flight." 



and the transparent front, roof 

I V 

and sides of the forward portion 

provide a wide and u 
structcd outlook for the pilot. 
It is closed by a sliding trans- 
parent hood, and there is an 

emergency escape panel be- 




r< ■ i s 




der 



tween this 










W. 










The "Hurricanes" of this Squadron were again in the news on 8th 
when 1 1 of them flew from Northolt aerodrome to Le Bourset 





airport to take part in the French Air Display at Villacoublay. In 
spite of a strong south-westerly wind the aircraft made the flight in 

66 min. at an average speed of 213 m.p.h. They returned to England 

on 12th July, and improved upon their outw 
from Le Bourget to 




time by crossing 



Northolt in 55 min., 

their average speed 



on this occasion being 



260 m.p.h, 
This 

s eater 



■ 




single- 
is a low 



wing monoplane. The 

frameworl 

wings is 




of 

it metal, 

but the covering is of 

ct w 



longeron of the fuselage. The extensive equipment includes oxvgen 

us and a two-way radio outfit. 

The guns of a lighter aircraft must be placed where they will not 

obstruct the airflow past the machine and thus cause unnecessary 
drag. Generally a gun is mounted in each side of the fuselage, near 
to the pilot, and these fire through the airscrew, interrupter gear 
preventing the shots from hitting the airscrew blades. Any addi- 
tional guns are mounted in the wings, and fire outside the arc of the 

airscrew. Ml the guns 
are fired by remote 
control. In the 
of the "Hurricane," 
however, all the eight 
guns are mounted in 
the wings. The reason 

this is that the 
of a modern 






fabric, a 

might seem surprising 

ne de- 

at over 



in an aero 



signe 



d to 






)ee 




300 m.p.h, 

care has been taken, 

however, to sec ure 
the fabric to the win 
in a manner that pre- 
vents any ten 
break away when the 





case 



for 




high-speed fighter has 
only a 



verv 




opportunity for ac- 



sighting 




cur. lely 
targets, and the gun- 
placing adopted in the 

Hurricane is in- 






tended to enublc him 

to use that 







A near view of a Hawker "Hurricane." This modern lighter has a top speed of owi 300 m.p.h*, any is one of tne 

fastest aircraft of its type in the world. 



tunity to 

ad vantage. 

The 



oppor- 

tliL* best 



aeroplane is Hying at top speed. The ribs of the wings are spaced 
only about 7 in. apart, and the fabric is drawn over them a 




inserted into special channels at the top and bottom of each rib. A 
metal strip shaped to fit into the channel is then placed over the 
inserted fabric, and the whole secured by bolts that are held by 

nuts on the underside of the channel. As the nuts are 







Rolls-Royce 
Merlin II" 1.050 h\ p. 
age, and the metal 
cowling 1 has detachable panels to facilitate impection or adjustment. 
Official performance figures of the "Hurricane'* are not available 



engine is fitted in the tapering nose of the 










tightened the fabric is drawn firmly into the channel. 

method the wing covering is held down by the whole area of the 

strips instead of only by the parts where the bolts occur. 

The leading edge of each wing is of metal, and inserted in it is a 



for publication, but the excellent flights mentioned at the beginnin 
of this article give a good indication of its speed capabilities. In 
addition it is known that it can climb to a height of 15,000 ft. in 6 
min, and that the service ceiling is 39,000 ft. The dimensions of the 

f * Hurricane'' are s 

The other two 



5 in.; height 13 ft. 3 in, 
here are the Hand ley Page 
"Hampden" and the Fairey "Battle." Both are medium bombers. 



pan 40 ft.; length 31 ft 
aircraft 



i 





: 



# 



U 



♦ 







t 



* 








MAGAZINE 



629 



military aeroplanes that form a middle class between the high-speed 



single-seater tighter and the heavy bomber and have to be very fast 



am 




highly 



manoeuvrable. They must also be 



strong 



and 



enough to carry a heavy load of bombs for 
not to the same extent as hcavv bombers. 








distances, but 



The "Hampden" is the latest JIandley Page aeroplane to go into 




quantity production for the R.A.I?., and the first machine to 
completed is illustrated on this page. It was christened by 

Viscountess Hampden at Kadlett aerodrome on 24th June, and is 



of the interior of the wings when desired. 

When the undercarriage is raised the wheels project about 40 
per cent, below the wings, and this would be an advantage if ever 









m e 







nam 

John Hamp- 
den, an English 

statesman of 

the 17th cen- 

tury who was 

famous as a de- 






fender of civil 

Sh- 





ies. 

Kingsley 
bod, the 
Secretary of 

State for Ajr 

was among the 
many notable 

presen t 

at the cere- 



the aeroplane had to make a forced landing with the undercarriage 
out of action. Normally the undercarriage is raised and lowered by 
means of two Lockheed hydraulic jacks, but a hand pump is also 
provided for use in emergency. In the rare event of both 

failing, the undercarriage can be lowered mechanically, 
in which case an automatic release valve in the hydraulic locks 

frees the under- 
carriage wheels. 
Special atten- 

has 
to ensur- 

that the 

undercarriage 

d own 
with the 

wheels locked 



' 





mony 







in a 








■ p 

IS 







» 



in position, be 

the aero 





ane land 



s. 



I mmediately 
the pilot 



thro 




back 



immediately 
after the 



Tue Hanuioy I'agc "HanijKUin" Usm-cnginetl bomber is now in quantity production for the R.A.F. The hrsl to tie completed i 

about to take off from Radlett aerodrome for a demonstration flight. Photograph by courtesy of "The Aeroplane, '* 






*s snown 



christening he described the "Hampden" as a fine example of the 



the engine the 
word "wheels" 

appears in 
lights on the 
dashboard in 



aeroplanes which are being produced to-day for the R.A.F. He went 
on to say that the military aircraft produced in this country are 



among the best in the world, as is 




by the 





of 



foreign countries to purchase them, "The rapidity with which design 
is progressing," he said, "is shown by the fact that the 'Hampden,' 

its dimensions are smaller than those of its predecessor, 




Harrow/ is able to carry a bigger load over a longer distance 
and at a much higher speed." 

The "Hampden" is a middle wing cantilever monoplane of 
all-metal construction. The fuselage, wings, and tail unit have 





covering, which is flush-riveted to give an absolutely 
smooth surface. The wings incorporate the latest types of wing tip 

# j 111 "I * A *■%■■* | ,| if m ■ *" 



slots and hydraulically-operated trailing edge flaps, and the wide 
tail unit has twin tins and rudders. The undercarriage is retractable, 
the 




cockpit, and an electric horn just behind him commences to 
and does not cease until he releases the undercarriage. The 

a red light that shows until 




is 






word 

the undercarriage is fully "down and the wheels are locked again, 

when the light changes to green 




Rolls-Royce "Merlin 1" engine fitted in the "Battle" is fully 
supercharged and is rated at 950-990 h.p. at 12,250 ft. With this 
equipment the "Battle" has a top speed of 257 m.p.h. at 15,000 ft. 
and can climb to that height in 13 min, 36 sec. The service ceiling 



is 25,000 ft. Sufficient fuel is carried for a 




it of 1,1(00 miles 






up backward into re- 
cesses in the stern of the 
engine nacelles. The tail 
wheel also retr.i* ts, mt" 
the underside of the 

fuselage. 

This medium bomber 
has 



at a speed of 200 m.p.h, and at a height of 16,000 ft., and even 
if flying at full throttle all the time the aeroplane can cover 640 
miles without a stop for refuelling. 

Normallv the crew of the "Battle" consists of a 'pilot and 
an observer, who also acts as rear gunner. The pilot's cockpit is 

in line with the leading 




accommo- 



dation for a crew of four 



con sis 




of the pilot 

and three gunners. One 
gunner 




3 the 

transparent gun turret in 
the nose of the fuselage; 
the second is accommo- 
dated in a gun position 
in the upper part of the 




Lage 



mi 




ia 




above the trailing edge of 

the wings; and the third 
one occupies a position in 

a special "balcony" mid- 
way along the bottom of 
the fuselage. This bal- 

is shown in the 




edge 

that of 



of the 



and 



wing, 
the observer 
is about 6 ft. behind 
it. Both are covered 



by a 



single 



transparent 



hood, the front portion 
of which, above the 
pilot, can be slid back. 



rear 




n is hinged 

so that it can be pushed 

rear gun is 





up w .™ ft 

required for action, and 
serves to protect the 



gunner from the rush of 
air when he is standing 



for 



A tairey 



"bailie" 




bomber in tin: air. 'I he long transparent hood covers both the pilot's cockpit and tnat 

of the observer, who also acts as the rear gunner. 



to operate his gun. 

The Vickers gun 
the pilot is fixed in the 

starboard wing in a 

position that enables it 
to fire just clear of the 
arc of the airscrew, and 
the sight for it is mount- 
on the windscreen 



illustration of this machine that 






on page 620, and it 
enables effective defensive fire to be brought to bear on any aero- 



ed 
of 



the 




plane that is rash enough to attempt to a 
from underneath the tail. 




the "Hampden" 




The two Bristol "Pegasus 

mounted in streamlined nacelles in the le 



Till radial air-cooled engines are 

ing edge of the wings, 




and three-bladed I>.H. constant-speed airscrews are employed. No 

details of the size and performance of this aeroplane can be pub- 

but it is known to have a wing span of about 70 ft., and 
to be very fast 




■*"-• r 



The Fairey "Battle," shown in the lower illustration on tliis page, 
is an outstanding example of the single-engine type of medium 



bomber. It is a stressed skin low wing monoplane- An interesting 




cockpit. 



The 



gun for the observer is mounted in the rear cockpit in 
such a manner that it can be stowed in a conical fairing there when 
not in use. There is also provision for the observer to act as a 
bomb-aimer, and he then lies prone on a cushion on the floor 

of the wing centre section. A sliding hatch allows part of the 

floor immediately in front of him to be moved back so that he 
can use the bomb sight. The bomb release switch is close to his 
hand, and there is also one in the pilot's cockpit. If the observer 
cannot be spared for this duty, the crew is increased to three. 



\nother type of fast, uudium bomber that is being produced 
in large numbers for the R.A.F. is the Bristol "Blenheim." This 



;urv" engines and has a nominal 



]S J I 




with two Bristol 



feature of the wings is that one 





running span wise, is so 



that it can be detached easily and quickly for inspection 



speed of 2So m.p.h. when 
middle wing monoplane 








loaded and flying level. It is a 
entirely bv a method of stressed 



construction developed by the Bristol company 



630 



THE MECCANO MAGAZINE 
















Coracles in Modern Britain 





Hid 








have 




published on how to build a canoe, but I 
cannot re- nil ever having seen instructions 
on how to build a coracle. Yet coracles are 

handy little craft, niore stable and more 

easily transported than canoes. They afford 
less opportunities than canoes for "showing 
off" or looking smart, but they might justly 
be described as the ideal of the poor angler. 

The illustration on this page, taken at 

Llechryd on the River Teifi, which divides 
Cardiganshire from 




shows 
the Teifi type of coracle and the method of 






carrying it. The Teifi 




es are the purest 



and most ancient type, but they are not 
covered with animal hides, as were those of 
the early Britons. The skin is of canvas, and 




A salmon fisherman with his coracle at 

the River Teifi, in South Wales. 




on 



the framework is of ash, hazel and willow. 
An average coracle measures barely 5 ft. by 

30 lb. or a little 




4 ft., and weighs a 

less, and its cOst is about £2. 

The Towy coracles*, often to be seen at 

Carmarthen, are of a slightly different form, 
and there are considerable variations in the 

types of coracles used on the Upper Severn 
and the Dee. In recent vears at least one 

41 

Welsh coracle has been made with alu- 

The experiment was costly, 







min mm r 

however, and little weight was saved; but 
doubtless the aluminium coracle will, 

with the hell) of new skins, outlive many 

■ .1. i^* 

of the older kind. 

Robot Inspects 100 Grains of Rice a Second 

i i 

One of the many interesting uses to which 

inventors have put the photo-electric cell 

is the sorting of rice. In a machine recently 
devised for this puqiose the cell scrutinises 



each grain 




rice separately, and rejects 



any that are not up to the required standard 
of whiteness. The rice travels through the 












machine at a speed of 100 yards a minute, 
and 100 grains are examined every second. 
The rice sorter is built up of units com- 
prising a 




mg 




a photo- 
electric cell and an amplifier for the current 
flowing through it, and a device for ejecting 



U QW 




grains. 




d 



unuer ex 



rami nation 



falls on to the centre of a rapidly revolving 

outer edge of which is a 



disc, on 
stationary 




w hir led ou t w a rd by 



and the grains are 



centrifugal 




force, 

up in single file against the guide. 

From this position they are shot off at a 
tangent and each in turn passes underneatt 
a circular 



i 



mercury vapour lamp, light 
reflected from the grain passing through 

the middle of the lamp to 

electric celL 
At the point w 



he 





g ram is 



v iewed 



in this manner it is moving over a si 





orm of the required standard of 

whiteness for good rice. Grains up to or 
above this standard pass unnoticed, but 
one that is slightly stained, and therefore 

below the standard, reflects a slightly 
smaller amount of light. This is detected 

ceil, 
electrical changes in which immediately 

bring into action a mechanism tliat blows 

a puff of compressed air across the path 
of the rice, directing the bad grain into 






a separate compartment. 

For commercial purposes any number of 
units can be built into a battery, and a 

machine with 10 units has an 
of 150 lb. per hour. 





Sunlight 



in 




Room All Day Long 



We cannot have too much sunlight, 



for 



more 




means 




health. Yet most 



of us spend the greater part of <>tn working 

lives in rooms into which the Sun's rays 



only penetrate for a short time .of the day 
and where there are spaces into which the) 






The modern tendency to build 
houses to face the Sun, and to provide then 



never go. 



i 



with larger windows, is a step in the right 

<■* j ■ » ■ 1 " T ~1 * i "I" 




ion, but very 




buildings offer 



many difficulties, and most of the sunlight 



reaching them simply falls on their roofs 
and walls, 

A machine has now been devised that 

enables us to change this, and to "illuminate 

apartments, offices and even basements 

J" ' 

with the light of the Sun. The accompany- 



ing 



illustration shows the Arthel 




conditioning machine, as it is called, on the 
roof of a large building. It consists of an 
enclosed glass cabin inside which is a 

movable mirror balanced so perfectly that 

it can be moved by two small propellers 
driven by electric motors of only 1/60 h.p. 
This mirror follows the Sun in its move- 
ment across the sky, the motors being set in 

through switches 






sunlight itself. There is no mechanical gear 
to wear or to get out of order, the move- 
meats of the mirror being achieved by the 

propellers alone, which work like those of 

an aeroplane. The switches too are of a 
special kind to ensure long life and freedom 

from defects. In effect they are delicate 

thermometers, depending for their action 
on the expansion of mercury under 













influence of the heat received from the Sun. 



The 




ays 




the 



moving mirror 

beam it reflects on a lixed mirror above it, 
from which the light 
also niotionle 



gut passes to a tliird mirror, 



ss, 




direct * it into 




e 



building to be Sun-conditioned. In a sense 

combination of mirrors fixes the Sun's 




rays so that they can be further reflected 
through mirrors and lenses to any part of 
a building, entering through windows and 



skylights. When brought into a space to 



be illuminated, the rays can be directed to 



the 



ceiling, 



which if white is 




of 



reflecting nearly 95 per cent, of the light it 
receives, or on to special ooal classes or 





glasses or 




other devices to give the necessary lighting 

and to concentrate or diffuse the 
Sun's rays. This light is always provided 
above eye level and the effect is to supply 
a stream of steady and transportable 
controlled 

An interesting feature of the Arthel 
machine is that 



sunlight. 









rays of sunlight it 

passes into a building have practically no 
heating effect. The reason for this is "that 
the quantity of sunlight caught 
mirror is no greater than that a large 
window will transmit. A photo-electric cell 

installation can be fitted to switch on the 

s in an interior room when sunlight 
fails, and to switch them off when not 
required: - 

Four different sizes of Arthel machines 
are now manufactured. The largest gives 
sufficient sunlight to illuminate an area of 
4,400 sq, ft. and even in winter such an area 
will be nearly twice as well lighted as when 








The Arthel Sun-conditioning machine. lis mirrors reflect 
the Sun's rays into the rooms of the building on 
which it is installed. Photograph by courtesy of 

Messrs. Arthel. London. 



equipped with 

Hie advantages of the system are obvious 




electric lighting. 




for comfort in reading 



Besides providing cool white light in 
ample quan 

writing and other occupations, the machine 
provides a healthier atmosphere and 
reduces the cost of lighting in interior 
rooms. The cost of running the installation 
is small, and almost the only maintenance 




consists 






cabin and the mirrors. 



in washing the glass 






o 



■> 












631 





* 






t 






A letter for the future, Tubes in which records of our 
civilisation have been buried. Photograph by courtesy 

of the Wcstlnghouse Electric and Manufacturing 

Company, Pittsburgh* 

A Message for the Future 

5,000 

hence know of the world to-day? A spec- 
tacular effort is being made to tell them 
how we work and play by the Westinghouse' 
Electric Company, which has buried a huge 

tube or capsule containing a record of life 

in our time on the site of the World's Fair 



What will the people of 




to be held in New York next year. The tube 
is described as an 8,0Oi.Mb. letter addressed 
to the inhabitants of the Earth in the 

distant future. 

To enable the tube to survive its burial 
for such a long period it has been made of 

Cupaloy, a special alloy of copper contain - 

small proportions of chromium and 

a combination that unites hardness 




with a 



.* 



high 




to corrosion 



It 



consists of a shell built up of six sections 

screwed together and brazed, with a final 

section that was 
tapering threads 
watertight joint. It is 7 ft. 2 in, 

and 8 in, in 






and within it is a 
Pyrex glass envelope embedded in mastic, 
in which the objects to be preserved for 

5,000 years hence are en- 
closed, The air in this envelope has been 

replaced by the inert gas nitrogen. 

It has been not an easy task to decide 



exa 




what should 




included in 




smaller 



space in an attempt to give a full record of 
our civilsation. The objects finally selected 

include about 35 in common use, among 

a hat, a J3ible, a 



them a 





toothbrush and a camera. Next come about 
50 small samples of textiles, seeds and such 

common materials as coal, asbestos, 

cement, metals and rubber. The seeds are 

lass tubes in the hope that they 



sea 




' 



1" g 



will be capable of germinating when 
this letter to the future is opened. 

A Hundred Books on a Microfilm 

Books form an important part of the 
contents of the tube. These take the form 
of a news reel showing characteristic scenes 
of modern times, from President Roosevelt 
making a speech and a baseball match tn 
bombing by Japanese airmen in China and 













fashion show in New York. Most import- 
it of all is a micro-film on which is printed 

more than 100 thick 

with over 1,000 







equivalent 
mes of fin 




j print, 
illustrations. This includ 




from the Encyclopaedia Brita 







a w 








nac 



ge ther wi 



messages fn»m Einstein and other famous 
men. Although space is limited, so much 
material has been packed into the micro- 
film thai it would take more than a vear 



merely 



A microscope is thought 



fullv provided for the finders of the tube 



and instructions are also (riven f 

projection machines 



mal 



£ 



he left altogether 



ery of this strange letter 



chance. It 





buried in the earth under N 



V 









because it is thought that future archaeolo- 
gists will naturally dig on the site of such a 
great city, of which ruins necessarily will 
still remain, even if New York and our 



d 






t hose 



Kg\ 



vilisation has perishc 



and 




potamia wh 



excavations are in progress to-day 





icr 




ms 




etions 




ing 



a 

the 



tube have been printed on special paper m 
bound books that are to be sent to the 
famous libraries and museums of the world, 
in the hope that a few copies will survive 
through the ages. These state the position 
of the tube, the latitude and longitude of 

been determined .so exac 



Weil have 




y would enable a coin about 




of a shill 




be found 



Sea Currents and Fish 

The greater part of the Gulf Stream, the 

famous ocean cu rrent that wa rms our shores, 

comes from West Africa and never enters 

■ ■ 

the Gulf of Mexico at all! Tins part makes 

up about four fifths of the combined current. 

It begins in the Gulf of Guinea and flows 

westward to the West Indies, It then bends 



northward, finally 

join the current from the 




north-east to 
of Mexico. 



Flowing south from the Arctic Ocean is 

the Labrador current, which is fed by the 




carries ice 




.* m mm 



glaciers of Greenland 

into the track of Atlantic shipping. It ends 

by plunging under the Gulf Stream, where 



it can readily be detected because its water 



is so cold. 





two currents meet 



seems to be the starting point of Atlantic 
cyclones, and our weather is partly deter- 
by this event, which occurs over 

._ 



m 




2,000 miles from our shores. 

The effects of these two currents go 

much deeper than this, however. The Gulf 
Stream 



brings with 



it sea animals and 

plants that our food fish do not like. When 

"" " " the 





cu rre 





it is strong, it pus 

flowing down from the Norwegian 

and the fish this brings with it are prevented 

by huge quantities of plant life from the 

Atlantic from coming south to the East 



Anglian Coast. The fishing harvest of the 



North Sea therefore falls 



■ 

does not happen 




the 



away. This 
Labrador 



current is strong, for then the Gulf Stream 




in 




is weak. Thus fishing 

North Sea are affected by the flow of the 

cold current alone: the coast of Labrador. 



Ice Cream "On Tap 



f * 




Victoria Coach Station, London, was 
first place in England to offer ice cream "on 



tap." Between the arrival and the departure 
platforms stands a new invention, rising six 
feet from the floor, like a huge block of ice 
cream in a spotless wrapper of cream- 



colour, blue, and chromium, 
Everyone who puts in his 



' 




■oen mes 








s a familiar 
"tuppenny 1 ' block of a well-known make of 
ice cream waiting beneath a flap. After the 
























two hundred tli brick leaves the cabinet, a 



warning disc reads "EMPTY," and a coin- 
returning device is ready for operation. 
For 40 years slot-machine experts have 
been trying to perfect an automatic vendor 
for ice cream, but refrigeration proved a 
stumbling block. One by one expensive 
mechanical means of maintaining the 
necessary low temperature had to be ruled 



« ) ut 








their 




cost but the 






requirement of skilled inspection pre- 
vented the sale of ice cream at the usual 








so, the piping or wiring for 
water, gas, or electricity limited the places 
where the machine could be used. 

Another trouble was the entrance of 



warmer air from outside whenever'a packet 
i >f ice cream left the machine. The resultant 



format inn of 








interfered with 




operation 



Now, after six years' experiment, the 

"ution to these problems has been found 

by a leading authority on low temperature 




work, Prof, W. 




de Haas, of the 




vers it y of Ley den, Holland, working with 




\\\ W. Hamcl 



an Austrian engineer. 



Using only solid carbon dioxide, familiarly 
known as "dry ice," without mechanical 

■ i ■ ■ ■ 



mechanical 



means of refrigeration, thermostats, or 
adjustable controls, their invention relies 
on the 




design of the interior, on the 
conductive property o f the metal employed, 
and upon advantage taken of the gas 

emitted by the dry ice 



jj 




Twice weekly a standard 12A-Ib. block 
of "dry ice," in a cloth, bag is placed in the 
thermos-like container made for it, 
covered with a thick, insulating cushion. 
The ' 'dry ice" rests on a copper plate, which 
is connected with the back of the ice cream 

storage chamber, containing the packets 

four vertical compartments. 




in 

Below them is a revol 






vine. 



cylindrical 




An automatic ice cream machine. The cover has been 

opened to show the containers. 

wooden block, divided into four segments, 
each of, Which removes one brick of ice 
cream from each compartment in turn. , 
When the customer lifts the flap on the 

remove the 
to ins 



outside 



the cabinet 




inner 









the "dry ice" decomposes, the carbon 
dioxide gas given off which is not only very 
cold but preservative in effect, is allowed 

to pass through the ice cream chamber. 

M. D. Bensusan. 








MECCANO MAGAZINE 




■ 

Here tee review books of inter tat and of use to readers 
of the 'MO//' We can supply copies of these books 
to readers who cannot obtain them through the usual 
channels. Urder from Book DepL, Meccano Limited, 
Binm Road, Liverpool 13, adding 1/- for postage to the 
price. Postage on different hooks varies, hut any balance 
remaining will he refunded. 

"Haste, Post, Master 

By Geokge Walker- (Harrap. 10/6 net) 

To-day the postman is such a 
figure that we take him for 

Actually he is only one of an immense host 
of letter-carriers of all ages and countries 




41 



The Romance of Flight" 



o 



By Capt. Norman MacMillan, M.C* 

(Evans Brothers Ltd. 1/6 net) 






This book has been written specially for 
young people by a practical airman of great 



*< 



From Pathway to Flyover*' 




experience. The author, 




>t. MacMillan, 





who have trav 




the 







i >r crossed the 



seas. The post indeed is as old as the art of 

writing; and Mr. Walker's story shows it to 
be one of the most romantic 
as well as the most useful <>f 



first began to 11 y in. 1916, and since that 
time has flown over long distances and in 

of the world. He has had 
experience of aircraft of all kinds, from the 
smallest of light planes to big multi-engined 

air liners and Hying boats, and lias made the 

first test flights of many important new 



By IX A. R. Kemp. (The Percy Press, a/6 net) 

;re is no more fascinating story than 
that of our English roads, which originated 

before the beginning of history in the 







aero 



. 




After describing the first 




of 





all our 




Every 



page of his book is of a fa- 
int erest, and the 



sorbing 

many 




illustrations 



add greatly to its 

tions. 

Mr. Walker first 











on the post runners of the 

Ancient World, and then 



strides forward to the ap- 

first 




of 



the 



ent 

English 

Sir Brian Tuke, 



■ 

Postmaster 



* < 4 



was 



This 
who 



• 



held tins 




in the 



reign of Henry VIII. There 
had previously been efficient 
and regular posts, notably in 
the days of Edward IV, but 
it was Tuke who firmly 
established the post. 

Then follows the intensely 

interesting story of 



v< 




>ment of the 

an d 



Elizabethan 





trackways of the lower parts of England. 
Mr. Kemp begins with these and then tells 
us how the Roman roads that followed them 
were made. He explains why they decayed, 
and tells vivid tales of the difficulties of 
travel in later centuries, when roads were 
mere muddy trackways and highway 

nded. The author tells the 
truth about these "gentlemen of the road," 
very few of whom were romantic characters. 

The revival of the English 
road came in the days of 

and Macadam, who 

constructed highways over 

swift coaches laden 
with passengers and mails 
could run. Those were 
great days of the roads. The 
coaches had names, just like 







am 



1 



the railway 

ship of to-day, and provide 

many interesting stories of 
famous c o a c h m e n 

■ 

and guards. 

prosperity came to an 

end when the railways were 




built, however, and by 1850 
the old road was dead, 

seemingly for ever. Then 
came the sudden turn of 
fortune by which our roads 
were lifted into greater im- 



portance than at any time in 



Picking up the mail without stopping in the early years of Queen Victoria's reign 

appears in "Haste, Post, Haste/* reviewed <»n this page. 




s illustration 



their history; and in 

of his 





times. It is crowded with exciting incident, 

■i. _ 




attacks on p 




carrie is b\ 



highwaymen, trouble following the refusal 
of mayors and other officials to supply the 

post with horses, and preparations for 
resisting the Spaniards in the time of the 
Armada. There are thrilling struggles to 
maintain posts in the face of stupendous 

'" * ' ' rivalries, and the 




difficulties and 

contents of the postbag itself yield many 

sturies. How the post was 
extended overseas forms a 





romantic chapter. 

When he comes to more modern times the 






author has an equally fascinating story to 
tell, passing from the mail coach, rattling 
over English highways, to the railways, 
which were pressed into service almost as 



soon as thev were built. How Roland Hill 



introduced 



ge 







valiant 



fights 



success is fully explained, 

sections we read of the famous Falmouth 

were concerned in many 

rsmen. 

Indians climbing the Andes, African 

runners in the bush with letters placed in a 

cleft stick, and riders of the Pony Express 

figure in the many thrilling tales of posts 

that the author has to tell. 





bn 1 1 oon 



Man to fly, and the 
glider, and airship 



ioneers, the author relates how the Wright 








rothers achieved the triumph of being the 
first men in the world to fly in a power- 




aeroplane. He then 




the 



development of the modern aeroplane, and 



describes briefly 




various types of 



aircraft in use to-day. Subsequent chapters 
explain how an aeroplane flies, and tell the 

reader what the various controls, levers 



last 

M r . 

Kemp describes the birth of 
the new road that the motor car and motor 
lorry have made necessary. What the future 
is likely to bring is well discussed by the 
author, who gives examples of modern 
motor roads, with 

and junctions. 




vers at 





The book is illustrated by six full 
e plates. 






<f 






The Pirate Island 



»» 



and instruments in the 




are for. 



The author describes what London looks 
like from the air, and how great mountain 

ranges appear to the pilot of an aeroplane 





m 



flight. 




natu 




to a 




discussion on map- making from the air, 

there is a chapter on the many 

- - - • f t 

ai rcrai t 






ifFcrent purposes lor whi 

are employed to-day. 

The book ends with a series of questions, 
grouped according to the chapters, that 
provide an 

and there 

aeronautical 




notes 



interesting memory 

is an excellent glossary of 

with some useful 

civil aviation as a career. 








add 



upon 
ny photographs a 
to the interest and value of the 




line drawings 



book, which is published in three different 
bindings at 1/6, 1/9, and 2/6 respectively. 



By D. E. liKut.vo. (A. and C. Black. 

■ 

Thrills in the air and desperate fights with 
gun-runners are combined in this stirring 
story. The gun-runners have an air base in 
one of the smaller islands of the Azores, and 
defy all efforts to discover their haunt and 

stop their evil trade. By a series of accidents 

Jack " 



Hawkins, a midshipman under 




oi ng 



instruction on an aircraft carrier, lands on 

.. - . .... 



their island with his grandfather, a retired 
Admiral who has set out to trail the gun- 
runners. There are many exciting scenes, 



and narrow escapes for all members of the 
party, before the miscreants are rounded up; 
and how the midshipman and the Admiral 
solve the problem of dealing with their wily 
and alert enemies forms a fine climax. 
"The Pirate L-land" is a splendid book for 
boys, who will revel not only in the fighting, 
■"it also in the fine Hying episodes. 






ft 








MECCANO MAGAZINE 













it 



The Modern Book of Ships" 



Bv W. H. McCormick. (A. and C. Black Ltd. 5/- net) 

Ships are as fascinating to boys to-day as 
they were in the days of sail, There may be 
some regret for the passing of the sailing 

>ers, but the wonders of great liners, 
ips, cargo boats, 
coasting vessels and the 



M He Went With Vasco da Gama 



, f 




By Louise Andrews Kent, (Harrap. S/— net) 

Vasco da Gama was the great Portuguese 

mariner who in 1497 boldly rounded the 
newly-discovered Cape of Storms, later 

more encouraging name of Cape 



given 




M 



Man 



in 



a Chemical World" 



( 



By A* C. Morrison 

•Scientific Riddles 11 



Bv Sir J- A. Thomson 
(Scientific Book Club. Each 2/6 net) 

These books are among 




many s 




new types 
of ships have deepened 
our interest in the sea. 

The full extent of the 
romance of the modem 
shin is revealed 

I 



Editor 



in 



his 




book. This is specially 
notable for the skilful 

selection of topics, whii ji 

cover practically the en- 
tire range of sea life and 

as 




ore 





as the highways 

witht tm pi 1 1 aging into 
unattractive detail .. 

To begin with the con- 



quest 



of 




North 



Atlantic by steam is told 




gives 
sue- 



in a chapter that 
interesting details 
cessive holders of 
Blue Riband. Famous 




for 
circulation to members of 
the Scientific Book Club, 
to whom they are avail- 
able at the special price of 

are 




w 




2 o net. 

interested in the Club 



should write to the secre- 
tary, Mr. Gilbert Foyle, 
121, Charing Cross Road, 

London W.C.2. 
The first of the two. 



. * 






Man 

I Vorld ' ' 



in a Chemical 




Mr. Morrison 



* 



has, been written as a 

■ 

record of the wonderful 



service 



that 



chemical 







is so 



industry gives us. 
packed with reliable in- 
formation that it is im- 

■ - 

possible in a short review 

M + M * * t M 





ing 




a 




The Diesel-electric bucket ureuger "Dieppe IV,** one of Die vessels illustrated and described in "The Modern 

Book of Ships," reviewed on this page 



^ i ve 

sketchy idea of i 
tents. These show well 





how 



chemistry affects 



steamship companies such as the P. and 0. 
in this country, and the ~ 
Generate 




>agme 




ique in France, are 
dealt with in the next chapter; after which 



of Good Hope, and then crossed strange seas 

. With him went Shane and 



practically every detail of 




la 




to 

Dennis O'Connor, Irish boys living in Portu- 



we turn to the splendid vessels that carry 
traffic across the channels separating Great 
Britain from Ireland and from the Conti- 
nent. Special attention is given to the train 

ferry between Dover and Dnnkerque, the 

, . A. m A.I ' 

most recent development in these 
channel services, and to busy train 
in other parts of the w 






gal, and their 




niese friend Joan. 



cross- 



> 




s 




This is followed by fascinating accounts 





of many special purpo 
these are the refrigerated 

ips that bring us meat 

fruit; the trawlers and drift- 
ers that supply us with fish; 
oil tankers, whaling ships, 
and vessels that lay ocean 

cables, 
devoted 



ise vessels. 



Amontf 



When the adventurers set off it was 

reported that they would find themselves 
sailing across seas of boiling pitch, and that 



modern life. We learn how the chemist has 
contributed to health, see that the task of 






they would end by dying of strange fevers, 
being swallowed by serpents or being roasts 

! None of these 



feeding the rapidly-growing populations of 
the world would be impossible without his 

aid, and realise the part that he plays in such 

ustries as the manufacture of" iron and 
steel. The book is concisely written and is 




not one to skm through, but rather a store 



ed for dinner by savages! 





fates overtakes them, but 

have sufficiently stirring times battling with 

storms/ suppressing mutinies, and fighting 
against natives and hostile Arabs. In all 



of knowledge in which to delve. 



rf 



Scientific Riddles," by the 




Sir 







Arthur Thomson, is of more popular inter- 
est. The author has selected examples from 
the thousands of puzzles that living things 
present, and has provided solutions as far as 




chapter is 



< 1 red *> ers 



and 



ice-breakers. 



\ 



rf* 



se 1 s 



that in different ways assist 
the 1 a r ge r o c e a n-goin g . sh ips. 

claim at- 

mysteries of 

a nd 




tention. 



battleships, cruisers 
destroyers are well explain- 
ed, and the story is 
up to date by accounts of the 
development of the sub 

4 __ 




marine 



and 



the 



1 1 re r a 




carrier. This section is com- 
pleted by an informative 

on modern guns, 




torpedoes, mines 



and 




) 




charges. 





these are possible, 
quires why we fall 
laugh or cry, and also won- 
der* how the Earth is kept so 
clean, where a cat 



gets 



its 



nine lives, why human beings 
walk in circles when lost and 

how we catch cold. With the 

answers to these go fascinat- 
ing discussions on such prob- 
lems as how life i<egan and 
whence came Man. Wher- 




ever one dips in the 
there is useful and interest- 
ing information. 



<( 



Adventures of a Prodigal" 

By Edward SuttOW 
(Harrap. 5/- net) 



This story of the adven- 



tures of a boy in 





at sea. 



coastal waters 






^nd 



in 



in the 



A deserter escaping from one of Vasco da Gama's ships at Mozambique, on the east coast of Africa. 



largely 
events, 
his 



based 



on 





channels leading to ports is next cons 
Here we learn how the sailor finds his posi- 
tion by observations of the Sun ami stars, or 

* * ' ' and how ships are 

guided along the courses laid 
down for them. Lastly comes a miscellane- 
ous chapter explaining ship measurements 








and nautical terms, and the ranks and rat- 
ings in the Royal Navy and the Merchant 



From "He Went With Vasco da Gama," reviewed on this page. 

these exciting events the boys play a great 
part, and when India is at last reached they 
are instrumental in rescuin 
after he has been imprisoned. 

Apart from the interest of the exploration 

elf, the book is attractive for its humour 
and for the many attractive people who 
figure in it. Vasco da Gama himself is seen 



ran cements 



ya is 

actual 

ureat 
and ar- 

are made to 




Na vy. 

The book will be treasured 




any bov 



wlio^atall attracted by the story W ship-, 




for it is splendidly written and packed wit 
accurate and interesting information. It is 
exceptionally well illustrated. L. p. B. 





not merely as a stern leader, but mIko a 

r human bein-jf, and there are wonder- 
ful pictures Of life on the explorers' ships and 

oft 

story is a merry one, and will be enjoyed, by 

all our readers. There is a coloured frontis- 
piece and manj 




e won 



derful new countries visited. The 



send him to a cattle farm in 
East Africa, There he takes happily to the 
entirely nevy life he meets, working steadily 
on the farm, and seizing every opportunity 
of travelling into the bush, where he has 
exciting times with lions, buffaloes, hippo- 
potamus and other wild animals. In the end 
he becomes restless and joins the police, I lis 
experiences in the Force are not encourag- 
ing, and he decides to go to sea. On his 
arrival at Mombasa he finds that he cannot 

Lft-1 ;t job, nor ,an lie pay his passage home, 

back to 





SfS. 









but eventually he finds his 
England as a stoker. 

The story is illustrated 
frontispiece and four full- 




- 








drawings. 









634 



THE MECCANO MAGAZINE 




GAUGE 









• 



SOME 



OF 



THE 



HORNBY-DUBLO SETS 





EDP1 Hornby-Dublo Electric Passenger Train 
Locomotive "Sir Nigel Gresley," Tender, Two- 
Rails. (Transformer not included.) 

$ DPI Hornby*Dublo Clockwork Passenger Train Sec contains streamlined six-coupled 
Locomotive "Sir Nigel Greslcy," Tender, Two-coach Articulated Unit and Rails. Price 39/6 



Sec comprlsinf streamlined six-coupled 
Articu faced Unit, Dublo Controller and 

Price 70/- 








EDG7 Hornby-Dublo Electric Tank Goods Train 
motive* Open Goods Wagon. Goods 
(Transformer not included.) 

Hornby-Dublo Clockwork Tank Goods 



Set contains stx-coupled Tank Loco 
Brake Van f Dublo Controller and Rails 



DO NOT MISS THIS! 

A Special Folder, beautifully printed in 
colour, is now available giving details and 
prices of the complete Hornby-Dublo range. 
Ask your dealer for a copy, or write direct to 

D.F*, Binns Road, 
















MECCANO MAGAZINE 




D 






r 




n 















The Hornby-Dublo System, Gauge OO, marks a wonderful advance towards the ideal home railway. 
By means of it a complete and realistic layout can be developed in very limited space. It is the 



perfect table railway. 



Hornby-Dublo Trains are unique in their scale 
accuracy and beauty of finish. They have been designed 
with the co-operation of the Railway Companies* who 
supplied special photographs and scale drawings. The 
Trains in motion are fascinating to watch. The Loco- 
motives are fitted with motors, either clockwork or 

■ ■ ■ 



on the track, are fitted to all Coaches, 




ns and 




ons. The Signals are realistic working models 

latest upper-quadrant type. The Buffer Stops 
have working heads. 

The Main Line Station, which is constructed in 






electric, 




a power and reliability never 




re 






achieved in this gauge. The Remote Control of the 
Electric Locomotives is perfect — starting, stopping, 




reversing and speed regulation are all carried out 
the movement of one lever. The control is positive 
Move the lever to "Forward" and the train 



wood, is a splendid model in the modern styfe. It will 
accommodate a3-Coach Train, and by means of printed 
slips provided can be named "Berwick" (L.N.E.R.), 
"Penrith" (L.M.S.), "Truro M (G.W.R.) or "Ashford" 
(S.R.), as desired. An Island Platform of similar style 



can be used either separately or in conjunction 









forward; move it to "Backward" and the train 
backward 



! 




oes 



the Main Line Station. There is also a 
for goods traffic. 







Depot 



every time! 



The track consists of solid drawn brass rails, 
giving the greatest electrical conductivity, mounted on 
a realistic metal base. All vehicles are fitted with 



Hornby-Dublo Electric Trains operate on Direct 
Current at 12 volts. This current 
either from 








nating 





be obtained 
Mains Supply 



pressure die-cast wheels that ensure perfectly smooth 
running. Automatic couplings, which link at any point 

Hornby-Dublo Trains are one seventy-sixth of the size of real trains. They enable you to lay out 



rough a Dublo Transformer, or from a 12-volt 
accumulator. The Dublo Transformers are specially 

designed for these Trains, and no others should be used. 



a complete railway on your dining table! 



MANUFACTURED 



BY 



MECCANO LTD. 



BINNS ROAD, LIVERPOOL 



13 







* 



636 






• 




innnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnannnnDnnnDn 






survey of the Hornbv- 
Dublo K nil way System and nf its various components. 



AST month we gave a ge 



month we 




vC 






operations that can be 

special features of the System 



as to the 

as a result of the 



The 




control that i> afforded with the Electric 



Train Sets makes possible some most fascinating working; 
the • urines can be made to I >ehave exactly as if there were 




on their footplates, for 




are 



enginemen in 

instant I v responsive to every movement of the Controller 

the connec- 

icr Dublo Trans- 



handle. The laying of the track is easy 




een 










tions 

former or 

sim ply 

The ms 
available in tiie 

Hornby-D 

range enables 

the model rail- 
to 





power suppk 



\\ 



1 1 let! 













and the Controller and track, are 




We will assume that the coaches are already alongside 
platform of the station. The station is the scene of 

as the Hornby-Dublo railwaymen go 

about their work and attend generally to the wants of the 





miniature passengers who are selecting their compart 



in en t 



t 






ts and getting settled for the journey. The locomotive 
is to take the train, No. 4498 "Sir Nigel Gresley," is, 
"" suppose, waiting in a siding near the station. When 
all is ready it can be brought gently on to the main line, 
feeling its way just as the real locomotives do when they 
are moving slowly. At a touch of the Controller handle the 

is stopped and then reversed in order to back 
into the station. The operation of coupling up 



engine 







\\ 




ow 






carry 

interesting 
train working, 

com pon- 

of 





s 




Passenger 
Train Sets, for 



example, both 



clock wd 




r 

v 



and 




ectric, are 
ideal for the re- 




which in 
practice always 
excites interest 
among those on 

the platform, is 





cert am ty 

which the auto- 

■ i 

matic couplings 
fitted 
Hornby-Dublo 
stock 

with one 



t o 




another. 

At last the 
eparture time 
is near, and 









luction 



of 



L.N.E.R. 



press 
"Sir 



ex 



Realistic working on a Hornbv-Dublo layout. The Tank Locomotive is shunting the coaches into the station to form a train. 

imotivc "Sir Nigel Greslcy" that is to haulthe train is in the siding. 




The Streamlined I, acorn 






moment 





ions. The streamlined locomotives, of which 
Greslcy." the subject of the Hornbv-Dublo 









model, is trie best known, are employed in general main 
line service and are to be seen working almost any of the 
more important long-distance trains. Similarly the famous 



tea 




passenger 




an 





characteristic 




of 






articulation so long familiar on the East Coast Route are 
spleiii.i ly reproduced in the Two-Coach Articulated 

packed in the Sets. 

There is also a separate Corridor Coach that forms a 
useful addition to the Articulated Unit in the composition 

Coach can 



train moves off in a remarkably realistic manner; the 
movement of the engine suggesting strongly the character- 
istic getaway of the real streamliners. Once the train is 
under way, speed can be varied according to the wishes of 

the operator. The train can be kept moving moderately at 
first, as if the engine were climbing as the real L.N.E.R. 
trains have to do when leaving King's Cross. Then it can 

I own. exactly as 





d up, and again si 




. 









.Its passage round certain curves 
gently, and stations can be passed 
train were obeying 








e ma 

as if 






a miniature express train. This 




form part of the regular set of vehicles used for a particu 



lar 




•ice, or it can 




used in addition 



coach for some destination, to be 




a through 
at an inter- 



met i tate 



The 




during 



the 




tli ere is a real 
L.N.E.l 



running of Hornby-Dublo 



of the main train. 

Trains is perfect, and 

in the management of the miniature 

any of the important main 

trains of real practice can be represented by it, except the 



such as are en- 
countered on a real journey. These variations in speed that 
are effected at a touch of the Controller hanule make us 
realise the thrill of perfect control; it is most exciting, too, 
to watch the train dashing through a station or plunging 
into one of the Hornby-Dublo Tunnels 





emerging at the other end. 
Long non-stop runs can 




be 



arranged, but 



it is more 



V. 








interesting from the operating point of view to run trains 
that make one or two stops during their journeys. Th 



e 



Irigh-speed trains such as "The Stiver jubilee 11 that are 

made up of special stock. By correct management of the 
single handle of t he Dublo Controller all the movements of 



splend id 





re 




ition that is afforded 




retard the tram 




c 






it 

it 



train can 




I) 



e 



of real trains. 




reproduce exactly the 



in imagination 




the running of a Hornby-D ub I u 



MfM 




alongside the platform with the uncanny precision that 
seems to lie second nature to most real engine drivers. The 
Hornby-Dublo main line Station will accommodate the 
coaches of a three-coach train alongside its 








* 















* 












MAGAZINE 



637 



With a train of this length, therefore, the locomotive has 
to be stopped a little way beyond the platform, and it is 
quite good fun to see how closely one can fit the train 
to the platform when stopping. 



When the train has made the final circuit of its journey 



n 




stand at 





to 



platform for a 




while to 

■ — ■ . 




its 




alight. 



The 










1 > a c ks 



engine 



the 



empty stock out of 

the station and into 

a convenient siding 

where the coaches 
can be stored until 






rev 




engine itseit can 

stay with them, or 

it can be uncoup- 

, and 

into a separ- 
ing reserved 

for locomotive pur- 
poses. 



In addition to its goods traffic duties, both in through 
running and in shunting, the Tank Locomotive r —- - f - 1 - 
connection with passenger work. It can be made to bring 
the coaches from the siding to the station to form a train; 
to add or detach any extra vehicles required, and to carry 
out the disposal of the train at the end of a journey. It can 

in fact undertake all 
the duties that tank 

engines do in actual 

practice. 

Splendid fun can 



be had with the 
Hornby-Dub J o 
Clockwork Trains, 

although 

not 



r 







Operations 



j ust 






ey do 
the re- 
ote control 






is 



characteristic of the 
electric models. 

b ra keel 




ev can 





reversed by 
J land, however, 

means of levers that 




as fascinating can 

be carried out with 

the components of 

the Goods Train Sets; indeed, in goods train shunting and 

marshalling the perfect remote control of engine and train 






Passenger and goods trains passing on the main line. In the foreground a Tank Locomotive is busily engaged in 

making up a train in the goods yard, where a Hornby-Dublo shunter is directing operations. 



movements can be employed to the 




est advantage. 



At the commencement of operations the 0-6-2 Tank, a 

representative of a type in use on all the big 

— JL L 






ems, can 





the engine siding and be made to 
attach a Goods Brake Van. It then sets off with this on a 
journey round the main track as if commencing a pick-up 
trip to collect vehicles from different stations. Actually on 



most layouts it 
tinuous main 




make a number of circuits of a con 
calling at the sidings serving the 
s Depot several times over in assembling the train. 
One wagon only may be collected in one instance, or 





two 



Locomotive, and are situated in the bunker in 

Locomotive. The locomotives are thus 



project through the 
cab 

streamlined Express 








V 











to 

handle, and shunting operations requiring the reversing of 

the locomotives can readily be performed. In order to 
make the trains stop at the stations it is a good scheme to 
make a series of test runs in order to find out how 
turns of the key should be given to the locomotive so that 
it comes to rest exactlv where required. The carrying out 




of tests of this kind is always interesting, and is even 
more so when the actual results are to be put to practical 
use on the railway. 

Clockwork train operation in this manner can be ex 






on 




occasion, 
load is 



another 

until a 
obtained. 

It is a sheer 



tremely entertaining, and we intend to publish details of a 

complete scheme of 








to marshal! a train 

Hombv-Dublo 
Wagons; the engine 
is under complete 










Wagons need 
be pushed together 
by the locomotive 
for the couplings to 



engage 



Forward 




this kind that will 
provide many hours 

of real fun. 

In a later issue we 
intend to give de- 
tails of the Various 
" Hornby-Dublo ac- 
cessories and their 
uses, such as the 
various stations. Of 
these the Main Line 



Station 



and 




A 



and backward 

BOB ... ■< 

along the different 
its train together 




Island Platform can 

-Dublo express makes an intermediate stop. The train is alongside the Island Platform, which ne used Separately; 




s the engint 



here forms part of a complete four-road station. 

ployed 






same 




S 




engines do. 





When running a mixed goods train of Wagons and Vans 
the operator can please himself with regard to the picking 



up and setting down of odd vehicles at 




stop 



s 



With a train of Wagons only, representing perhaps "coal 

traffic, stops to pick up only will be the rule until 
the train is como 




e 




can then be despatched on a 
journey to the loading centre. Through journeys with the 







intact throughout 




be 






ms 



composed exclusively of Vans, which may be considered 

as conveying "perishable" *—»- 





as shown in 




e 



or. they can be em- 
ower illustration 




on this page, to form a large through station. 

The Goods Depot is ideal for its particular purpose, and 
greatly improves the appearance of any *™«v.4 ***«* t*„ 



1 a r ge 



f r 



deck" or 






arrangement on 




orm 




ak-'S posMl 

J 




Its 

realistic 

and 



the Hornby-Dublo figures 

t he 



In conjunction 





can 



be 



considered the Signal Cabin, atypical modern structure. 
This is useful in many places on the layout, and is most 




w 




are 






near any station on the main line. 

themselves; they are 





Associated 

■ m b 

necessary to control the traffic and are very realistic. 






638 










MECCANO MAGAZINE 










R 




hanised Equipment in New Factory 



□ 

n 







* and canning of peas sounds a rather dull 



and unexciting process, and it is therefore surprising 
to find how interesting the operations really are when 

scale with the most' up-to-date 

by a visit to 




on a 



large 



This can be 





the line factory recently, opened by the well-known firm 




of 

grading 




graders. 



& 



peas 



discharged down chutes 



from the picking room to different parts of the factory. 



They may be required either for canning or for packing 



in cardboard 




tons, each 







entailing several 

1 J 




Batchelor's 




Limited at \\ adsley Bridge, 



four 







where the work has 

. The 





miles from the centre of 

been brought to a high degree of 

of 550 cans of peas per 

minute, and the weekly output of 1 h million cans that 



will soon be 

kind in 




will make it the 



1 argest 



ot' its 




w 




interesting features. The firm of Batchelor's was origin all j 
founded for pea- packing, and it will be appro 
therefore to describe this side of its 






required weight is accurately me: 




The factory is el steel, brick and concrete construction 
and covers an area of six acres. It is built in five parallel 

bays with the offices 

one 







at 

another 

block devoted to pea- 

intr divides the 



From the chutes the peas are delivered on to el< ctric 

J- 

The 

and discharged automatically into a cardboard carton 

passing underneath. These cartons are fed uno 
to the weighing machines and are first of all opene 
suction. Then, as they pass along the side of the machine, 

one end of each carton is folded and glued, and a packet 

of steeping solution 
supplied from an ad- 






ma in op 
from the stora 

1 





in the 
building are the roof 
ffJazine. carried half 

w ay 



g 







n 







on the sides of 
each bay, designed to 
ad mi t 




the brick- 
work specially faced 
to tone with the sur- 









rounding country. 




J a 




machine 



is 



placed inside. 
The carton 



now 
passes under a re- 

volving head that 

delivers the measured 



% 



weight of peas into 
it; then back alon 

opposite side of 
the machine, 

flaps 







are 



folded and glue< 1 . The 

next 

een two 

belts that 



filled 
moves 





Throug 





t he 



factory the products 



A general view of the new factory at VV adsley Bridge, Sheffield. It covers an area of six acres, and with six 
acres adjacent foi Mtp.msion, is the largest establishment of Us kind m ihe world. The illuslratiuai to this 



hold down the glued 
ends to ensure that 
1 1 ley are ti rm 1 y s t uc k 



article are reproduced by courtesy of Batchelor's Peas Limited. 





er. 



A 1 1 



these 



are practically untouched by hand. An extensive con- 

their automatic transfer 
and the machines act 




one 



together 





as a 



co-ordiiu 




un i t , 




pi ?as are 



brought in by road, or carried in railway trucks right up 
to the factorv, which has its own private siding from 



the main L.N.E.R, line to Sheffield. They are stored on 
the ground floor of the building, from which they are lifted 



ried out with amazing rapidity, 

delivered 

machine. 




rate 



are 



The flaps of the cases 
turn move 

* .VI 





operations are car- 

the packets b ei n g 

per minute from each 

cases. 



compressor 








where pressure 



is maintained until the glue has set. Rectangular cartons 

various standard sizes are dealt with 




elevators as 





ure 




the pea- picking mom. 






picking or 



u 



needle" 




to 
which are very ingenious 



in construction. They consist of revolving drums studded 



on 




. 






inner 






needles that 






and carry 







a 



e number of 
damaged and broken 







nnes. 





elhng 








cages also 




handled , 




g 



and glueing the 



round them 



' 





from 




point of view of 



canning 




artment. It 



is 



The rejected peas then fall into 



partitioned off from the rest of the building by a white 

lazed brick wall and has been very carefully designed. 




an axial trough, being diverted there by 





e s , an cl 
trough until 
bags attached to 



rotating 




worm moves 

down a chute 




aio j i g 



the 




one of two 



.. . 



end of the 




T 




receives 

ad j acent 
jury 









-pic kin 






at 





aged 





ensures 

that have not 





removal of 
caught by 



From the grading room the peas that are to be canned 
pass down chutes into soaking tanks on the ground floor. 
The tanks arc arranged in two rows, and there arc in all 

on iron 1 




46, of welded 

■r 

and rendered mobile 







castors. Here the 



as are 



steeped for approximately 15 hours. The water is kept in 



constant circulation by means of a 3 h.p. motor-driven 
pump, and in this way the peas are also thoroughly cleaned. 





a 



i 







>, 







» 



THE 




MAGAZINE 



639 




have 
fur the necessary time 






the 

peas are 







tan ks 






are adjustable to lit various sizes of cans, and the cans 




delivered by valve control into galvanised iron troughs 
A stream of water carries them 




a per 

angles to the 
travel liner. 




along 




troughs 



to 



elevator 





at 



right 



which they have so far been 




are moved bv enc 




flexible 



s 




wi res 




to the filling machines into which 



delivered bv chute 

rom these 
















on 




c ans j 
through exhaust-boxes where 




with 




peas 



• 



are heated 



mg 



partitions stop the 
peas at whichever 
elevator is desired. 



They are then lifted 

blanching 

which 




to 
machines, 

consist of revolving 

drums with water 

at the bottom and 

at the 
driven 




ea c 1 



i 








same 




as 



the 



elevator that 



supplies it. 





eas 



next 



into a revolv- 

cage connected 
with the blanchers, 

and are there cool- 






ensure 



is trapped with the 
peas. 






move; 
to 








nnes 



wi t h 
per 



up 



to 






minute 



carrv out the 

of 



120 

a n ( 1 





canning 



proces 



>. 






ed by water 



>ravs. 



■ 

Cooking the peas. The cans arc lowered into the sleam-hcatcd retorts, and removed from them by overhead 

electric cranes. The clocks show how long cooking has been in progress. 



Finally from the cage 
white endless rubber 

over by hand. 





on to a broad 
are once more 



Each lid is placed 
in position and its 

over the flange of 
a can to seal it 

is 

next process 

is done in one 





an 








which is driven 




a 



1 h.p. motor, carries the peas to another bucket- elevator 

to storage bins in a gallery 






can-filling machines to Which 



above 

passed down 

This 
the factory, 
here the empty cans 

solution that goes into the 

The 







extends 




whole 
central point of the 
also 





delivered 




of 
for 



brine 



i 



of two ways: either in high-pressure steam ovens or in 



large, 





of six and five, into which 



retorts arranged in two groups 







cans are lifted in crates 



and from which they are removed b\ 



7 





cranes. Or they may be passed on conveyors through 
high- pressure steam ovens, the conveyor system being 
driven by a 5 h.p. motor. There they are 
heated to a temperature of 240 degrees F. before passing 
to another section of 

by water-sprays. 






m 




oven where they are cooled 
retorts or the ovens the 



cans 





peas . 



solution is mixed in ten 

300 gallon steel coil-heated 
open tanks on the plat- 
form, and from them it is 



fed by gravity 




er \ 




e 





into 




• 









p ~ 




*> 




The ingredients 



of the brine tanks are 
handled by another travel- 
ling crane above the plat- 

form, 
carries 




m 




i 




three 



small 



50 



gallon tanks of syrup for 

the fruit canning equip- 
in ent . 

One of the most notable 




ures of the 



the 




9 



cans 




is 



which the 



vere 





from 
trucks to the fillin 




nes. Though 
cannery is situated in 






the 



pass out of 
into ano 

building to 
labelling machines, 
which deals 









Each can 
runs over the roller of an 

electric ally- heated gumpot 



and 
in a 





>id s 

is 



itself 




pasted down. The labelled 
cans are then packed by 
machines into boxes ready 



for 



dispatch 



from 







factory 

Although the 
and canning of 



the main activity carried 










An alternative method of cooking The cans of peas move on conveyors from the steam 

exhausters on the right through the high-pressure cookers in the background. 



products 

with, 

canne 




ory, ( 
are dealt 
output of 















es is 




centre of 






ing 



T 1 1 e 






cans 



;i 





received at the far end, the transfer takes 

from the trucks 







on to 
12 ft. 




elevators, iron 




is f 



or the most 



rapu 





each 











that already described. Fruit preparing 
as apple-scrapers are 




as 



structures about 



•en by its own small motor. From 



such 

to the season 

of the year, but most of the machines, such as that 



chang 





the chute at the top of the elevator the cans pass through 
the walls of the factory on to an eight-fold runwa> 



the drive for this system being provided by three motors, 



used for filling 



the cans with fruit svr 









one 



located in the gallery already mentioned. The runways 









that finally seals the cans, are the same for every type 
of product. This is an excellent example of an industry 

from small beginnings has grown to a 

r short time. 




undertaking in a rem 





I 




THE MECCANO MAGAZINE 




♦ 



These pages are reserved for articles from our rccklers. Contributions not exceeding 
500 words in length are invited on any subject of which the writer has special knowledge 
or experience. These should be written neatly on one side of th* paper only* arut should 



he accompanied if possible by original photographs for use as illustrations. Articles 
published wilt be paid for. Statements in articles submitted are accepted as hern 
in good fatth 9 but the Editor takes no responsibility for their accuracy. 



I- 



stnt 



Refugees 




Spain 




the horrors of the Spanish 




War, the 



humanitarian work of evacuating non-com hat ants carried 
out by the British Royal 



had full equipment that proved very heavy to m 




i in. 



On arrival at camp after a lone: route march we had 



to wasli our feet and clean 




rifles, and then lie on 






our backs while an officer came round to ins 



for 



blisters, 




feet 

so 






Navy has 
a beacon. In order to 
deal with the problem 

naval authorities 



the 




their 



more 



co m mo< 





agena 
Valencia 




and 



Barce- 




lona, these places being 

of evacuation . 

addition, destroyers 
collected stranded refu- 
gees from other points 
along the coast and took 
t hem to the larger ships, 








i 






to see 

were spotless. 

several afternoons 

ed demonstra- 



tion 

the 



b 



the 



use 



of 






e-gun. 




of 

en 



anti- 

tiring tracer bullets at 
targets. These bullets 

a streak of Are 







.•■ 



behind them, 




w 





fired at the rate 

of 250 rounds a minute 
they form an absolute 

HP 

sheet of flame. 



where they were fed 

for a couple o 

daVS before beine trans- Spanish refugees being transferred from a British destroyer to H.M. Repair Ship 
J ° Alicante. Photograph by R. L. Mauger, Soulhsea. 



< f 



Last Post 



ii 



"Lights 



Out" 



or 
was 



i * 



ferred to other destroy- 



ers 




the run up 

« . i • _ t i 





to Marseilles, 



Resource" at sounded at 10 o'clock 

and that meant bed! 












The repair ship "Resource" had a 



time at Alicante. Some of the 




busy 




the idea of boarding 

hoisted from a destroyer's 
home in a" crate 




refugees 



did not 




the gangway, 
■ to " ' 







guard was kept at night, and there was a competition 



for the most 
Sometimes 






evening 




were 







the 








orary 

cr vessel's 25-ton 



electric crane, as shown in the upper 






was a sing-song. 



ingenious cadet got a number of mugs, 

with the aid of a stic 






thi 



s 








e. K. L. Mauger (Southsea). 






^ .,.,„.,« turned 

them upside-down, and with the aid of a stick played 

tunes as on a xylophone. He played seve 

songs, and soon had the whole company singing away 





- 



* bf *V* Tl JLAWJV-* WJIA*MWi4 \ fc^JLiEJ^J 

at the top of their voices. 



Under 







nvas 



O.T.C 





ie 



At the end of the summer term 

.T.C. con- 

s vear I 





the 

tin gents 

wen t 
Strensall, in 















were 




com pan v to 
where 26 
, We slept 



in bell tents, from 




o 



_ 



eig 




cadets in 




1 



except of course the 




( )ne 



day was 




m 



York, 



where most 

Minster, and 



of 






US 



visited 







walked round 

the city on the ancient walk Others 




took boats 
We 





ki 



\iver 



Ouse 




barracks 



after a rea 













Like all 



good 









s 




rM 



camp 



eventually came to an end, and 
one morning we w T ere up at 4.30, 

handing blankets and 



packing 




other 



material 



into 





officers and N.C.O.'s. 

We got up each morning at 6.30, 






The O.T.C. camp at Strensall, in Yorkshire. Photograph by 

D. Willing, Olton. 



made our 

wards there was 




and then 




for 







nes a 




. After- 

on other days we 






marched 
and 




to an immense common near 





carr 




camp, 



we 

cartridge or air rifles, or 

at football matches, for effect purpo 



out manoeuvres, using 




mare 1 1 




and 



Finally, after 
day's work a 
oft to Strensall 
camp was held at the 

M 

Lancashire Regiments, and 






i 



even rattles of the type seen 






as hosts during our 




i 







T onets were 






never 




« 



although some 



of us carried them, but we 



of the 




w n 




in a good 
breakfast , we 

homeward bound. 

of the Yorkshire 

m ■ 

soldiers acted 




There was also a detachment 




at 




e 




and they demonstrated the trooping 





i 



colours to us. 






D. Willing (Qlton, Warwickshire). 



• 






* 







• 






* 




: 



*> 



* 



* 



THE MECCANO MAGAZINE 







Making Lime in Somerset 



The 





town of Watchet, near Min 

coast of Somerset, is noted f 

if 





e 




> 





means "'blue/' 



on the 
aster and 
ml there, and the town's name actually 






ong 





. 




Life on 




Bass Rock 






VVliile staying at Nortli Berwick during the summer 




for a sail to 
Firth of Forth. The 




I 

Bass Rock, at the mouth of the 

■ ■ ■ 

is a towering pinnacle inhabited 

sea birds, and is 




ing a 

saw a boy industriously 






loading them 



into 



"saddle-like" 



ar- 



rangements fastened on 
the backs of mules. 






I 

stones were for making 
lime. When the boy had 



got full li»ada 






he drove 



: 






to 





es up a steep 

top, 

some hundred feet up, 

where there were several 






kilns. The lip of each 

.1 

kiln was Hush with the 

fur- 




s i mi 




to 





tl 



1C 







sa ^ratg on 
When look- 



♦ 



ing at it from the sea I 
wondered how all the 

room to 



found 



bi rd s 

move about. The air 

to me 





filled 




it 

with screaming 

and they covered 








without ceremony, 



ledges 



The 

attract 




bird 



to 



* 



was 



■ 



a 








ground, while 

nace was on a lower 



Mules al Watchet in Somerset carrying blue hias rock from the sea shore to kilns on the cliff top where 

it is made into lime. Photograph by L. V. Blackwell, New Maiden. 



my attention 
cormorant, 
could see that it was a 

bird with 



e v er y 




& e 



webbed 






the 




1 









ers navniff 



taken advantage of a natural 



slope when making them. The stones the boy had gather- 



top, and 
alarmi ng 




wer 



fed into one of the kilns throu 
as soon as they became hot they split 

a tt _t __ _' _ _ /v _ __ * n jp--_ ___ _ _ 






now and then it plunged 



pops 

The 



a ud 





s in 



ave 



off 





fumes. 



into the sea, to emerge a few seconds later devouring a 
fish. The bird is a powerful swimmer and an excellent 
diver. Its diet consists mainly of fish, and it is reputed to 

be the most gluttonous of sea 







ticular one I was wa 



■ 




->een alight for 18 months when 1 

was quite a 




did not seem 



Certainly the par- 




them, and I found that three 

normal length of time for them to be alight, I was also 




s 




f 






swallowing a 



it dived repeatedly, 





b 




be 



reappear 




told 




this 




of making 
reds of years old, and 
liad not varied since it was first used. 



The cormorant does;, not build a nest, but lavs its 




me was 




solitary egg 






The product is of very high quality. 

en). 



L. V. Black well 




ew 




The Bishop's 

Wells 





P 



s. 




ers visiting Wells should not 



miss seeing the lovely 13th century 
Bishop's Palace, which stands close 




a s 





to Wells Cathedral, 
a guide will conduct them over the 
grounds and point out everything of 

The great dining hall, once 




the largest in the country, is now in 



ruins 



» 



although the great 



places can still be seen . Hie 

" St. Andrews Well, 





om- 









three from which the 




name, also can be seen there. 

The Palace is 



of the 
gets its 




by a 

moat. This was dragged some years 
ago and 




interesting" relics 
m^v found, including swords and 

cannon balls that no doubt played 



w 






on a rocky ledge. 




le 




had an 



eg 



b 



in 



a w 




lined case and showed it to me when 

■ 

, It was 




he saw I was 

curiously shaped, being 

one end so that it coul 
small circles, 

chances of its 
Another 

first to be a 




s 








s 



rolling off the ledge. 

girt at 

% j 

of gull or seamew 
ving for fish. I was 
was a guillemot, 
notable for its finely- pointed bill and 
short stumpy tail. This bird is white 
underneath/with a dark brown back, 





and 







a small ledge 



also lays its one 




on 



Some birds I noticed were emitting 
a strange call/and when 1 heard that 
they were called kit ti wakes 1 was not 
surprised, as this name represents as 

nearly as speech can the call of the 
bit 




itsc 






looks very 

beautiful with its white and slate- 
colouring and yellow bill curv- 





1 1 wa 







at the tip. 



a 




in the Civil Wars. 




Swans at the Bishop's Palace, Wells, ringing a bell at 

time. I 1 holograph by J. 





son, 



Ed g ware, 



ing 

kit ti wakes could be seen 
bottom of the cliffs on 



The 



swans now glide over the mirror-like waters of the 

moat, and they 





nests 




through many swan 

to a bell under a wh- 
at 






near 




down 

string is attached 

and 






feeding times the swans 




i he 



drawbridge 



the bell, as seen in our illustration. 
to them from 



string 

is 







cas 




w 





Hampson (Edgware) 



eggs. 



of seaweed, in which they lay three or four 

Nearer the top of the cliffs, and conspicuous with their 
bright blue, red and yellow beaks like that of a 
was another kind of bird that aroused some amusement 







because of its awkward way of wadd ling along the cliff top. 
It was very graceful in night, however. This uird also lays 
just one egg in a 



¥ .. 






IS 




wn as the 



puffin. 




T. Burchell (Edinburgh). 



• 






642 



THE MECCANO 





□ 

□ 

□ 



nnnanDDDnnnnnDDnnnnnnnnnnDanaDnnaannnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnDnnnnnDnnnnnDn 

a 
□ 
□ 

a 

a 

a 

a 

a 
a 

□ 









Bridges with Opening 




ans 



□ 
□ 
□ 
p 

nnnnannnnnDnnnnnnnDnnnnnnnnDnnnnnnnannnnannnnnnDnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnn 

counterweight is travelling up or down this portion, and 



WTHEN a navigable river has to be bridged, the nature 



W of the surrounding land sometimes makes it difficult 




to 

buildin 




long 




necessary to allow the 



a bridge of sufficient height to permit tall- 









mast ett ships to pass beneath it. Several different types of 
structure have been designed to overcome this difficulty. 
In these one span can be moved aside or raised in some 
manner in order to leave the channel 

The main types of movable structures are the bas 
bridge, the rolling lift bridge, the swing brid 

lift bridge, an 
ce fine subjects for Meccano 
They are interesting as structures 
which girders, braces and ties can be 
reproduced in a remarkably 
istic manner by means of Meccano 
Angle Girders and Strips, 
digniiied movements of 
spans of the models add to their fascin 
tion. Special bridges of 
dealt with in this article have been 
scribed in the "M.M.," 
wide choice of originals 



the lift-span is almost closed or has just begun to rise, very 



little of the 



weight is 



tak 



en by the track 




the 



greater portion to be carried by the ropes, thus providing 



^ 



the greater pull 
position. 




to balance the 













base reallv attractive models. 



' r h e 







bridge 




A bridge fitted with an automatic counterweight of this 

ould make a very attractive model, and those in 

of a prototype will find a good example described 

and illustrated in the '*M.M." for June of this 

cover oi which shows the complete 

bridge. The counterweight can be made to rim 

tour Pulleys, and for making the curved 
tracks it is best to use Curved Strips bolted end 
to end. The 5.V" Curved Strips should be used in 

to ■ 

•mm *■■ 



conjunction with 2£" Curved Strips, the latter 

being useful for forming the steeper portions. 

When fitting the counterweight to the track, 

the wheels should be allowed a little end 



play on their axles so that they can adjust 

themselves to the width of the track, 

this may vary slightly from 

to point. 

Bridges of the double bascule 







is pcrhap 



Fig. 1. 

A neat model bascule 



bridge of the 




easiest type of movable bridge to repro- 
duce in Meccano, In its simplest form it 

consists of a span pivoted at one 
that it can be raised or lowered like the 
drawbridge of a fort or castle, A counter- 
weight is provided to balance the span, so 
tively little power is required to 

A Meccano model bridge of this kind is shown in Fig. 1. 
The counterweight beam is connected to the span bv a 



type. 



type, that is with a divided span, 
each half of which can be raised, 
are sometimes used on wide rivers. A 
rood example of one of these bridges is 
the famous Tower Bridge, and an interest- 




ing 




el 




this is shown in 



Fig. 



3. The 




it 




pan 



of rigid 



Rods, 




is weigh 




at its rear e 




by a 



number of Strips. An Electric or Clockwork Motor can be 
used as the power unit, and the small 



be 




satis 




if care is taken 






M 

balance the 



balance weights in this case are not visible, because they 




are fitted on the bascules themselves behind the piv 
When the bascules are raised, the weights sink into 
wells provided for them. 

When building a model of a bridge of this type it is a 



good ,plan to 




the balance weights slightly heavier 



span corr* 







In some bascule bridges the counterweight is mounted 

a curved track 



than the span. Then it is onlv necessary to connect the 
control Cords to the weights inside the towers, so that the 
bascules can be lowered by winding up the Cords, 





on 



on a wheeled carriage, which tr 

that Slopes downward from the head of the tower support- 



ing 



the span to the ground. When the 
span is fully raised the counterweight 
is in its lowest position, that is on the 




raised by slackening them off. 

The rolling bridge is really a development of the single 

bascule bridge. Instead of turning on a pivot, however, the 

span rolls on quadrants fixed at the sides 
of one of its ends. The rolling surfaces of 



* * 



quadrants 




of the track where 



almost 





ovided with open- 

lixecl 



moun 




on 



horizontal. Most of its weight is then 
carried by the rails, and only the £ 
amount required to balance the span 



-J 



9 9 



■ 9 



>* '•" 



-W 



4.| 



*'■ • ? 



mgs 

guides or racks engage to prevent the 

span from slipping. The counterweight is 

placed between 



m its 




position 



taken 



ropes joining the counterweight 



4t 





At the other end of the curved track 
the slope is almost vertical. When the 



% * 



m 



Fig* 2* An electric- 
ally operated vertical 
lifting bridge. This 
fine example is the 
work of H. Bertreux, 

Nantes. 



quadrants. 
The building of suitable quadrants for 
a Meccano model should not prove diffi- 



cult. For 



would be a 



good plan to arrange a number of 
Threaded Pins .or 



Bolts 



the 



« 




j 



u 



o 



■ i 



■ 



■ ■ 



Jim 



' 



X 






.; 



«*— 



■ i 



; 



± 



w- - 'j 



. .' 



fff I 



I * -I. 



I a 












* 



t 



t» 



* 



THE MECCANO MAGAZINE 



643 



shanks of the Threaded Pins protruding upward so that 
they engage in the holes of the Strips forming the quadrant. 




2 illustrates a well-built model of a vertical lift 






e, in which the span is raised vertically by means of a 
Motor concealed in one of the towers. Balance weights are 

provided in the towers and are connected to the span by 
Cords that pass over Pulleys at the tops of 
the towers. These 

taper towards their upper ends, 

each is fitted. a small inspection ladder con- 




structed of 121" 



joined 



Meccano Ball Bearing or, if it is too large for one of these, 
by a Geared Roller Bearing unit. If neither of these Bear- 
ings is available, the next best plan is to use a simple type 
of roller bearing consisting of Pulleys fixed beneath the 
span and resting on a circular track on the "' " / " 
One of the most fascinating types of bridge is the trans- 
porter. In model form this is par- 
ticularly attractive, as is shown by 
the splendid miniature, illustrated 
in Fig. 4, of the famous transporter 

bridge that spans the River Mersey 



Brackets. A splendid example of this type at 



Middlesbrough 



was 














with in 
e Maga- 




I 



n 



model 








between 



Run- 



trated in the "MM." for April 1935, and 
others in 
Canada and 

Holland also 

have been 



corn and 

Widnes . A 
transporter has 



no opening span 
in the ordin- 
ary sense. In- 

a mov- 






e 








ro ad way 

A demonstration model of the suspended 



lift 

and indeed of any opening type of bridge, interest is added 

by including the traffic lights on the approach roadways 



Fig. 3. 

Tower Bridge at London. The two leaves of the road 
way are raised and lowered by an Electric Motor housed in one of the towers 



from 

trav 






carriage on a high span 




backward 




a 

ing 
forward 




and the barriers that close automatically just before the 
span begins to rise, that are features of the actual bridges. 
Control of these structures is exercised by an operator 

situated in a special box, usually mounted at a height giv- 



ing a good view 




r o un d , 




the flashing of lights of 



different colours indicates the exact position ol' the span 

while it is being raised or lowered. This system of control 
can be applied to a 
model with very little 

dim 

need 






across the waterway. In the model shown in Fig, 4 the car- 
riage is slung by cords from a crab driven by an Electric 
Motor in one of the shore towers. The carriage first travels 
to one end of the span, pauses there for a few seconds, 
then travels back to the other end. After another short 




pause the sequence is re 

out by means 

versing mechanism 










cse operations are 





re- 




in one 




the 




rers 



Model-builders 



who 



c 






e 




is 



is a number of 




insulated studs, w 
are placed at equal in- 

er 
lace of one of the towers. 



tervals along the 




The studs are arranged 

so that the span makes 



contact w 





of 










in 








it is 



raised and lowered, and 
are connected to a con- 



board 




lamps. 








wish to construct models 
of tliis kind will find the 



automatic reversing me- 
chanism described under 
S.M. 63 in the "Standard 
Mechanisms" Manual 
suitable for the purpose.- 
Another trood method is 



to fix trip levers to the 

near the limits of 
of the carriage. 





can be built up 
from the 6 B.A. Nuts 
and Bolts and Insulated 

are includ- 

ed in the Elektron range 

of parts. 

The best known swing 
bridge in this country is 

that at Kincardine-Oil- Fig. 4. H. Shorten, Rcgina, Canada, built this fine model of the famous transporter bridge across belt Ol 



These trips should be 
connected by Rods to 
the switch lever of the 
Motor, and so arranged 
that when the carriage 
makes contact with 
them they are pushed 

us reverse 





the Motor. 

I n the case 
driven model it 
necessary to arrange a 




c 



le- 



Forth, which was 

scribed and illustrated in the "M.M." for February 1937. 



Several line models have been dealt with in the "M.M 



the River Mersey at Runcorn. 




Chain 



> " 









J 



on page 231 of the April 1938 

issue, and readers therefore will be familiar with the 

principles on which they operate. The span is 
pivoted at its centre on an island pier specialh 
for it. 









are left on 

island, so that shipping can proceed up and down the river 
quite freely when the span is in the open position. 



In a model it is best to 







the centre span 




a 



between Sprocket 
Wheels mounted at the tops of the tower, and to connect 
the crab to it at one point. A Crank Handle is then geared 
directly to the Rod carrying one of the Sprocket Wheels. 
Alternatively, Cord passed around Pulleys can be used 
in place of the 

Automatic reversing •mechanisms arc also useful for 





mcor 




m 



other types of movable bridges. 




can be used for 

vertical lift 



©ample, 

bascule 

modifications for opening and closing swing 



bridges, 




For 

the spans of 



with suitable 



I > ridges. 






644 



THE 




MAGAZINE 



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Section 



Spanner 








Speed Controller for Electric Motors 

(N. Ta'Bois, Woodford Green) 

From time to time I have described in "Suggestions Section'* 

ingenious ideas suitable for controlling the speed of Electric Motors. 





devices use was 




most of th 
made of a centrifugal 
either connected by a lever to a 
variable resistance or fitted with a 
stop to limit the movement of the 



entire assembly being free to rotate on the Rod. Rod 11 is gripped in 

ing by two Pivot Bolts, each of which carries a J* Pinion on 



a 









overnor weights, as in a gramo- 
phone speed governor. 

While devices such as these are 

in most cases where 
the speed of a Motor has to be kept 
constant, there are certain in- 
stances when this type of mechan- 
ism is unsuitable. For example, in 

an electric clock the speed of the 
driving motor must be known, and 
one method of ensuring this is to 
subject it to the control of an 
auxiliary motor of the synchronous 
type, the exact speed of which can 
be readily calculated. A Meccano 









Electric Motor controlled by an 

easilv 




syn 




s 



m 




is 







r n in Figs. 420 and 



420a. The mechanism was designed 

by N. , C. Ta'Bois, Woodford 
Green, Essex, and the synchronous 

motor is suitable for working from a 6-volt Transformer. The 

Meccano Electric Motor can be of either the 6-volt or 20-volt type. 

The principle of the mechanism is as follows. The Electric Motor 

the synchronous motor are both coupled through reduction 




its shank. A J* Contrate 12 meshes with these Pinions as shown. 

The 5" Rod 13, which is free to slide in its bearings over a length 
of about J", is fitted with a §* Pinion and a 50-tecth Gear that 

meshes with the £ * Pinion on Rod 

9. A 3" Pulley with Rubber Tyre 
is attached to the base by a l*x 1" 
Angle Bracket, and two lengths of 
Spring Cord are mounted on it as 
shown, care being taken to stretch 
the Cord slightly in order to 

of the wire 




prevent the 
touching each other. 

A Pendulum Connection 17 
makes contact with both pieces of 

Spring Cord of the resistance 
controller. 

The ratio of the gearing between 

the Electric Motor and the differ- 
ential permits the armature to 
rotate at four times the speed of 
the synchronous motor, that is 
at 3,000 r.p.m. 

In order to operate the mechan- 
ism 




r Pinion on Rod 13 is 
thrown out of mesh with the "" 




Contrate by lever 16, and the 



rotor of 







*y 




ous motor is 



Fig. 420 







gearing to a differential gear, the cage of which is connected tfirough 

further gearing to a contact that moves over an electrical resistance 
connected in series with the Electric Motor, When both driving 
Con t rates of the differ en tial are rotat- 
ing at the same speed, the cage re- 
mains stationary; but it at once 
commences to rotate if the speed of 



commences to operate, the 




on. 



the 




Motor iluctuates. The 



contact then moves over the resist- 
ance and increases or decreases its 

value accordingly, so that the Motor 
gains or loses speed. This continues 
until the cage is stationary once more. 
The maximum speed of the Electric 
Motor is considera bly higher than that 
of the synchronous m 
obtain the highest efficiency it must 
be allowed to run as near to this speed 
as possible. It is necessary therefore to 
incorporate a greater ratio between 






the differential 




Electric 






. 



een the differential and 



synchronous motor. 

The components of the mechanism 
are mounted on a base built as shown 



in the illustrations. 




rotor of the 



svnehronous motor is a Face Plate 1 
and is provided with 8 poles, which on 
a frequency of 50 cycles give a speed of 
750 r.p.m. The casing or stator con- 
sists of two 5 J* K2r Hat Plates 2 in 
which lour Elektron Magnet Coils 




spun in an anti-clockwise direction. 

■ 

When the synchronous motor 

Electric Motor is switched 
If the two |" a Contrates in the differential rotate in the 
same direction the Motor switch lever must be reversed. 

The Pendulum Connection 17 is next moved over the Spring Cord 
until the 1 J* Rod in the cage of the differential remains stationary, 
and the V Pinion is then slid into me-h with the |* Contrate. Any 
fluctuations in the speed of the Electric Motor will now be trans- 
mitted through -the differential cage 
to the Pendulum Connection 17, which 



will simultaneo 




move over the 



Spring Cord and automatically in- 
crease or decrease the resistance in the 
electric circuit to the Meccano Motor. 
The model to be driven can be con- 

■ ■ 

nected to any of the geared shafts in 
the Motor side plates. 



(421) Lub 





s in 



Meccano Models 



When 




ing Meccano models 



over long periods, it is always advis- 



able to 




the 




of the 






various shafts well oiled in order to 
avoid wear on the shafts and bearings, 
and also to reduce friction to a mini- 
mum. Normally the model-builder 
goes over the model with an oil can 

but when a model is 



occ 




required to operate without any 
attention, some system of automatic 
lubrication is necessary if it is to 
remain trouble free. 



The best method is to 



use 

x 



the 



Fig. 42Ua 



Meccano Grease Cup (Part No. 174). 
This makes use of semi-solid lubricant 



complete with Cores are mounted, one Coil being secured to the 







and the remaining Coils in the positions shown. The Coils 
are wired together in series. 

Bearings for the differential mechanism are provided by Flat 

Trunnions 4 and 5. A 4&* Rod 7 is journalled at one end in a Strip 6, 

and at its other end in an Angle Bracket as shown. Pinion 8 meshes 

with a 57-tceth Gear on a 3" Rod 9, that carries also a Socket 

Coupling 10 fitted with a f* Pinion and a Double Arm Crank, the 



such as vaseline or graphite grease, which is fed to the bearing 
by screw pressure. 

An alternative automatic lubrication system is the syphon wick 
lubricator. In this arrangement a cup filled with oil is arranged near 
the bearing to be lubricated. A short length of wick such as that used 
in petrol cigarette lighters is threaded through Spring Cord and one 
end is dipped in the oil, the other end being fitted in the tapped hole 
of the boss forming the reinforced bearing for the shaft. 



> 



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THE MECCANO MAGAZINE 



645 



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(422) Penny-in-the-Slot 

Mechanism (H. Norton, Sheffield; 

In exhibitions of working models, such as 

those held periodically by Meccano Clubs, 
it is advantageous to arrange the models so 
that t hey can be set in operation by visitors. 
A simple switch will of course serve the 
purpose, but where a Meccano Club is con- 
cerned a "penny -in -the-s 








on the Bush Wheel until it has moved 
clear of its face. 

The chute in which the coin is 

consists of four 3 V' Angle Girders, pairs of 

which are fitted together in the manner 

shown so that a penny can easily be placed 
between them. The pairs of Angle Girders 

are connected by IfxT Double Angle 
Strips, a washer being used on the inside of 





an ism is more desir- 
able* With a device of this 
kind a model is set in motion 

when a penny is inserted in 
the slot provided, and is 
automatically switched off 

_ 

after a definite period of 

• Such a mechan- 
ism is shown in Fig. 422, and 
as will be noted, simplicity 
is the keynote of its design. 
The mechanism is carried 

on a base formed by joining 

a 5.1" x2T Flanged Plate to 
a 5.1" Angle Girder by the 
Electric Motor and a 3* Flat 
Gin k'r. The lever 1 is formed 
by a 3" and a 2\" Strip over- 
lapping three holes, a Double 
Bracket being clamped be- 
tween the two Strips. One of 
the Bolts joining the Strips 

Elektron Contact 



is 



a 1 1 



Screw 4 



, the purpose of which will be 
explained later. The Double Bracket is 

pivot ally mounted on a K Rod held in a 
Collar by Spring Clips. The Collar is sup- 
ported by a \" Bolt fastened to the base, 

and side play in the Double Bracket is pre- 
vented by Washers. At one end of the lever 
1 is a Bush Wheel 2, oii which the pennies 
". The rear end of the lever 1 is kept in 
contact with a stop by a length of Sprin 
Cord 3. which is clamped at one 




or 



end 
between two vertical 2" Strips. 

The weight of a coin dropped down the 
chute depresses the Bush Wheel against the 
action of the Spring Cord and brings the 
Contact Screw 4 into contact with 
a second similar part fixed to the 
base. The second Screw is insulated 
from the base, but is connected by 
a length of wire to one terminal of 
the Electric Motor. One of the leads 
from the Transformer is connected 



Fig. 422 

each lug for spacing purposes. The angle of 
the chute is so adjusted that the coin does 
not slide down too rapidly. The Flexible 

Plates are then fitted to 




the coins 



in 




a 




rece 




When mounted in a model, the mechan- 
ism should be covered with Plates, and the 
drive should be taken to the model from 
the shaft carrying the 57-teeth Gear and 
Contrate Wheel. If desired a celluloid 

window can be fitted in the mechanism 
casing so that the operation of the device 



can 








The device is shown 




a 




Electric Motor, but if desired either an 



to which the moving jaw of the vice is fixed, 

and each pair of Angle Girders is spaced 

apart by the flanges of two Angle Girders 

placed one on top of the other. A 3\" Angle 

Girder is attached to each guide by a 3* 

pair of 







Flat Girder, and each su 

2±*x2A* Flat Plates. The vertical 3" Angle 

Girders 3 carry the fixed jaw of the vice. 

The slides for the moving jaw are pairs of 

5V Angle Girders 2, which 
are connected by a 24" xU* 

V m> mm 

Flanged Plate 5 supported 

by T Angle Girders. A Z\" 
Angle Girder bolted 
the 2" Angle Girders carries 
the 3j5x.«t* Flanged Plate 
that forms the moving jaw. 

This Plate is braced at each 
side of the jaw by three 
Architraves, which are bolt- 
ed to Flanged Plate 5 and 
to a second similar T>1 ' 
fixed to the 3$* X 2 V Flanged 
Plate. 

The vice is operated by a 

6, which is 
into a Threa 

Crank bolted at the back of 
the fixed jaw. The Screwed 
Rod passes through 
Angle Girder fix 
5, end play being prevented 
by a Threaded Boss clamped 
in position bv a nut, and the 3" Pulley. The 
latter part is fixed to the Screwed Rod by Us 

■ -* fc ^ 1 ■ i ■ 1 1 ■ J_ _■_ 













set screw and is additionally gri 




by two 



nuts placed one on each side of its boss. 
The vice can be secured to a work bench 
by passing screws through the Flanged 
Plate forming the base. 



(424) Wind Direction Indicator 



P. 

details 




(P. Lees, London N#l) 

London N.l, rece 



an 




sent us 

■w ... 

ing wind direction 




indicator that he constructed from Meccano 






parts. In this a large vane is mounted on the 

end of a horizontal Rod fixed in a 






to the remaining terminal, while 
the other lead is connected to the 
Motor frame. When the two Screws 
make contact, the electric circuit is 
completed and the Motor comes 
into operation and drives the model 
to which it is coupled. 

In order to remove the coin 






from the Bush Wheel, and thus to 

stop the model, the Screwed Rod 5 
is arranged to move across the face 
of the Bush Wheel. The Screwed 
Rod is lock-nutted in the tapped 
hole of a Collar fixed on a 2\" Rod. 
The latter part carries a 57-teeth 
Gear and is journ ailed in the boss 
of a Crank bolted to a 3r Strip, which can 
be seen in Fig. 422. The 57-teeth Gear is 
driven from the Motor, a Worm on the 
armature shaft of which drives a 57-teeth 
Gear on a 3* Rod journalled in two l ff xT 
Angle Brackets. A f* Contrate Wheel on 
t his Rod drives a '}" 1 in ion on Rod 7. and a 
Pulley on Rod 7 drives through a 

of a Rod 




Coupling on the 




end of a 



vertical 




The latter Rod is 



supported by a framework of Angle 
Girders, and at its lower end is a J* 



Gear that meshes with 




second similar part on a horizi 
Rod, This Rod is fitted — * 





a 



pointer that moves over a circular 
dial on which the main points of 
the compass are marked. The 
pointer is set so that it indicates 
north on the dial when the vane is 
pointing in that direction, and the 
true direction of the wind at any 
time can then be seen at a glance. 

device, also 



A not lier 






Driving Band a similar 
carrying Worm 6, which finally turns the 
57-teeth Gear. The ratio of the gearing is 

or is switched off one 




such that the 

minute after a coin has been placed in the 



slot. The 



so adjusted 



height of the 



Screwed Rod 5 is 




it continues to press 




Fig. 423 

El or an El 20 type Motor can be 

(423) Meccano Vice 

(L. Williams, Northampton) 

r 

One of the roost useful tools in a model 



builder's 





a vice for holding 



objects while they are being filed or solder- 



ed. A strong Meccano vice of a handy size 
for average work is shown in Fig. 423, and 

was suggested by L. Williams, Northampton. 

A base for the vice is provided by a 

5.1" x2£* Flanged Plate, to each of 'the 

long flanges of which are secured two 7£* 

Angle Girders. These form guides for slides 



made by Lees, is a wind speed 
indicator. This consists of a two- 
bladed fan mounted on the end of a 
feod iournalled in a suitable frame- 

work of Strips. The Rod is fitted 

with a lever arm that is connected 
by a Spring to the framework of the model. 
The shaft on which the fan is mounted has a 
Rack Segment fixed to it, this part being 
meshed with a V Pinion. A further step-up 

gear of 2 : 1, consisting of a 50 -teeth Gear 
and ?" Pinion, is arranged in the framework 
of the mechanism, the final shrift being fitted 
with a pointer. This pointer moves over a 
dial graduated in miles per hour, and in 
order to graduate the scale correctly 
took the device out in a motor car on a calm 
dav and noted the position of the pointer at 
various road speeds. The device depends for 
its operation on the tendency of the airflow 
to turn the fan blades a gainst the Spring. 




646 




MECCANO MAGAZINE 



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a 

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a 

a 
a 
a 







1 



a 

D 




Crane — Tricycle — Motor Car 




Carrier 



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THE chief feature of the four new models described this 



i 




is 




earner 




a 




r vanetv. 
motor car, 




range from an aircraft 
from Outfits Nos. 1 
and 2 respectively, to a realistic model of an ice cream 
tricycle and a 





crane. 




ice cream 



tricycle requires an Outfit No. 4 for its construction, while 

crane can be built 




The top of this consists of a 5f"x2£" Flanged 




to each of the longer ilanges of which a 5|- 



// 




1 




u 



Mrxihle Plate is 




ed. 




of the 




// 



xH" 




Plates is extended downwards by a 5|"x2J" Flexible 
Plate to form one side of the container, but to the other 




from 
larger. 




are bolted two 2V X 2V Flexible Plates so that a space is 



No 



7 or one 



The model aircraft carrier is 






shown in Fig. 1 . Each side of the 

hull consists of two 




com 



* pound strips built up from 5| 



// 



and 



9.L" 



" 




ened 



Strips, 

together 



which 



are 





Brackets.- The sides are joined 



by 



3" 
f 




5 at the forward end, 



and the night deck is fastened to 
them by Angle Brackets inside 

the hull. 

The deck is 





T 




o 




left for the 

No. 1 Clockwork 




otor 



of a 
The 



latter is bolted direct to the 



of the 5-i" 






2 



X21- 




llange ~ r "*" «**-«" 

Plate. The lower edges 

5V X2V Flexible Plate and the 

two 2V x2&* Flexible Plates are 



braced by 5£" 



*"r^ 




i ront 







of the 



container are each formed by a 
2\" x I \" and a 2|" x 2\" Flexible 

Plate and a 2J" Curved Strip, all 

of which are bolted to 








flansres of the Flanged Plate and 




Srxir Flexible Plates over 



Ftg. 1. A simple but effective model of an aucralt carrier built trom UuUit No.l. 



2 




lapped two holes, and at one side of it two Double Angle 
Strips are fitted by a Reversed Angle Bracket to form the 

of the island superstructure. The Reversed Angle 
Bracket also supports two Angle Brackets that represent 
the bridge. A Flat Bracket is fastened to the top of the 
superstructure by an Angle Bracket to form a support for 



the 3£" Rod 




is us 




for the mast. 






Parts required to build model aircraft carrier: 4 of No, 2; 4 of No. 5; 2 of No. 10; 
7 of No. 12; 1 of No. 16; 1 of No. 17; 3 of No. 22; 26 of No. 27a; 28 of No. 37b; 2 of 
No. 48a* 2 of No. 111c; 1 of No. 125; 2 of No. 126; 2 of No. 189. 



The chassis of the simple model two-seater motor car 



2£*x£ ff Doubl 








ngle 



also are attached to the sides of 
the ice cream container by two 




The front Road Wheels are locked on a 'SV Rod 




is 





in two Flat Brackets bolted to the sides of 
container. The -Rod carries at its centre a V Pulley, 

which is connected by a 2 V Driviner Band to the driving 

shaft of the Motor. 



*-■> 





er frame of the tricveh consists of two 5 



I if 

2 







m 




• 






Strips 




2 consists of tw«> o.l-" 




, which are joined at their 
rear ends by a 2|" x \" Double Angle 



Strip. Two 2|" Strips 2 are bolted to 
each Strip 1 to form the supports for 
the sides and the roof of the car. 

The near side of the car is built up 



from a oV and a 2\ 



// 





with a 2£"x£" Double Angle Strip, 




the side not 




- 1 . 

is similar 






except that the Double Angle Strip 

by Flat Trunnion 4. A 



is 





/7 xir 



Flexible 




fixed 



in 



position by two Trunnions 3 is used 
for the top of 




bonnet 

■ 




the 




Strips. The latter are bolted at their forward ends to a 
Double Bracket that in turn is secured by a lock-nutted 
bolt to the centre hole of a Double Angle Strip fastened 

between the sides of the container, 
pair of 3" compound strips, each con- 
sisting of two 2V' Strips overlapped 
four holes, are used for the rear forks, 








th 









ey are 







on 





5|-" Strips by a 2" Rod that forms the 
axle for the rear wheel. Two 3|" 





s are mounted on a 






1 2 



Rod 







ssed through the sixth 






'om 
the forward ends of the 5¥ 
The upper ends of the 3|" Strips and 
those of the 3" compound strips are 

X J- 






lugs 



of a Double 



radiator is represented by a Flat 



Fig. % A Meccano two-seater coup£ driven by a Magic Motor. 



Bnirkrt . Two Flat Trunnions arc 

fastened to the Double Bracket to 

the saddle. One end of 





union attached to the sides of the car by two Angle 
Brackets. 

The roof of the body consists of two 2i"x2V / 




l¥ Rod carries a Bush Wheel and at the other end is 





es curved to shape and fastened by Angle Brackets 
to two 2£" Curved Strips, which are secured to the 
upper ends of 2%' Strips 2 



Parts required to build model two-seater motor car: 4 of No, 2; 6 of No. 5; 2 of 
No. 10; 6 of No. 12; 2 of No. 16; 1 of No. 17; 4 oi No. 22; I of No. 23a; 2 of No. 35; 
40 of No. 37a; 3S of No. 37b; 2 of No. 38; 2 of No. 48a; 2 of No. 90a; 1 of No. Ill; 
2 of No. 126; 2 of No. 126a; 4 of No. 155a; 1 of No. IH6; 1 of No. 18K; 2 of No. 190; 
1 Magic Motor (not included in Outfit). 



a 1 
o n 



*f 



I 





is 









1 



/> 



Pulley 



rear 



The illustration shows how the ice cream man himself 
is built up and secured on the saddle by means of an 



,\ngle Bracket. The 2V f Strips forming his legs are fasten- 




together 




lock- nut ted bolts. One of his 










is 



Construction of 




ice cream man and his tricycle 




'11 in Fig. 3 is commenced with 

■ 7 





ice cream 



attached to the Bush Wheel and the other to an Angle 
Bracket bolted to the boss of the 1* Pulley on the 1 V Rod, 



so 




as 






runs 



along 



the floor his feet 



move up and down realistically, as if he were pedalling. 



* 



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THE MECCANO MAGAZINE 



647 



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Parts required to build model ice cream Iricvcle: 6 of No. 2; 2 of No, 3; 8 of No. 5; 
4 of No. 10; 2 of No. 11; 7 of No. 12; 1 of No, 15b; 1 of No. 16; I of No. 17; 1 of No. 
1 8a; 5 Of No. 22; 1 of No. 24; 7 of No. 35; 68 of No. 37; 1 1 of No. 37a; 8 of No. 38; 
1 of No. 40; 1 of No. 48; 3 of No. 48a; 1 of No, 51; 1 of No. 52; 4 of No. 90a; 4 of No. 
lilq 2 of No. 125; 2 of No. 126a; 2 of No. 155a; 1 of No. 186; 1 of No. 187; 2 of No. 
1 88; 2 of No. 189; 4 of No. 190; 1 of No. 192; 2 of No. 199; 4 of No. 215; 2 of No. 2 1 7a; 
1 No. I Clockwork Motor (not included in Outfit). 

The remaining model to be described is the fine gantry 



actually bolted to the carriage but are supported from it 
by two 1 1" Discs. The lower 3i" Rod carries at one end the 

ey supplied with the Motor, and a 2J* Driving 





Band is passed round this and also round the upper 3^" Rod. 
A 57-teeth Gear on a 4" Rod journalled in the frame of 



crane shown in Fi 



cr 
6' 



4. 




the car 




is 








gantry rails are each formed 

_ _A . , _ Ml 



by a l%¥ Strip to the ends of 

two upright 



w 




are 




12 \" Angle Girders. Pairs of 
the latter are joined across by 

174" compound 

The gantry is constructed 
from two 19" compound angle 
girders 






w 1 1 




V 



, the ends 
are joined by two 3| 
To the horizontal flange 
each of the orders three 




5^x1 1" Flexible Plates and 

one 2J"xH" Flexible Plate 
are bolted, to form a plat- 
form. The outer edges of the 
P 1 ate< 



s are 







o-. 



i" 



gth en ed 




2 




that are 



in position by 
Brackets. Further 
different 




Angle 

of 





are bolted to 

the 5 V Strips to represent the 
irders used to brace actual 




mesh with the lower \" Pinion, 
The 4" Rod forms the winding 
drum, 




it can be made to 
revolve in either direction by 
sliding first one and then the 



other of the 




Pinions into 



mesh with the Worm Wheel. 
When the upper Pinion is in 



mesh with 




Wo r m the 



drive is transferred by the 



Driving Band to the lower 






// 



Rod and from this Rod to 




le 



winding 



drum 







the second ?/' Pinion and the 



2 




Gear. When the 
lower Pinion is in mesh the 
drive is transmitted direct 
to the winding drum through 



the 57-teeth Gear. The 3V 
Rods carrying the Pinions are 



conne 



>cted 



by 



a 



2**X* 



Fig. 3. This working model ice cream tricycle and driver can be built from the parts 

contained in Outfit No. 4. 




IS 







gantries of this kind. The 



gantr> 



t runs on 




// 



Flanged 



Wheels, two of which are mounted at each of its ends on a 



$¥ Strip secured to the girders 1 by two 
Angle Brackets, The Flanged Wheels are 



IV Strips and 



2 




to 




sr 



in 



Strips by 




and 




// 



Bolts that are 









Double Angle Strip, w 
held in position on the Rods 
Collars, in order to facilitate sliding them into position. 



The hoisting Cord is tied to the 4" Rod 
it several times. The free "end of the r 





ar o un d 











The sides of the driver's cabin consist of two 5£"x2J" 

Plates bolted under- 



through 



Flanged 








is then 
block and tied to the 2i"xl 





// 



The crab is 





r turning a large Crank Handle 4 




journalled in the girders J. A length of Cord is tied to 

2 of the carriage, wo 





neath the platforms by their 
shorter flanges so that thev are 











A\" apart, and they are 
forward by two 2 }{ X 2£" Fie 
ble Plates. The latter are joined 
by two further 2£* x24" Flexible 
Plates that lorm the front of the 

i ■ 







Two 5J"x2l 

are used for the back of 



cabin 



■ 



and 




Flexible Plates for 



W X 2i 

floor 



// 








framework 




the 




) 



tluit runs on the gantry* is built 
by bolting two %¥ Strips to the 
flanges of a 2¥x\ 1 / Flanged 



Plate 2. 

Strips 

Double 





join 
Angle 




of the 

2£" x ¥ 



:i 



The 









tightly five or six times ar 
the shaft of the Crank Handle 

over a 4" Rod 
of girders 1. 





is 






and then 
at the other 

The free end of the 

tied to the Double Angle Strip 3. 
A similar method is used 
for traversing the gantry 
the rails. Two 






along 





of Cord are used in this case, 

however, 

r o un d 

pound 






the 




coin- 




handle consist 




a Crank 
by an 11 






rr 




,L 






ex 

4* 




T 1 ie 



crank handle 



journalled in two of the 




ers 



wheels of the crab are mounted 
on two 3 ¥ Rods t hat are journal- 

in the turned up ends of two 

IV XV Double A nde Strips. The Fig. 4, A fine model electric gantry crane operated by one of the new 
4 z & r all-enclcsed Meccano Electric Motors. 



A 



At 
the 





is 
Angle 
rails. 






other 



i 




are passed over 



Double 
Brackets. The Double Brackets 




journalled 



in 



kit t cr are supported byTrunnions 



are bolted to the 



17 i* 



<5f 



co in- 



fra m 



Flanged 



Plate 2 and Double 



Arnde 



Strip 3. 



The Electric Motor is mounted on the Flanced Plate 2 



* 



by two |* Bolts, each of which carries four Washers on its 



shank to space the IVJotor upwards. A Worm Wheel on the 
driving shaft of the Motor is arranged to mesh with either 



of two ¥ Pinions, which are fas 
one of \\ 




on 



two 






Wor 



m 




is journ 
in two 




-2 





the 




ler 




Rods, 
the 



The 2¥ Strips are not 



1 

pound 



strips joining 




rail 



s 



and the 1*1 



tf 



Rod 






s are 



fastened in them bv means of Spring Clips, 

Parts required to build model gantry crane: 12 of No, I; 16 of No. 2; 6 of No 3; 
2 of No. 4; 12 of No. 5; 4 of No. 6a; 8 of No. 8; 2 of No. 10; 4 of No. 11; 12 of No. 12; 
2 of No. 12a; 1 of No. 13; 1 of No. I5a; 2 of No. 15b; 4 of No. 16; 2 of No. 18a; 1 of 
No. 18b; 1 of No. 19g; 1 of No. 19h; 4 of No. 2l>b; 4 of No. 22; I of No. 23; 2 of No. 
26; 1 ■■( No. 27a; 1 of No. 32; 12 of No, 35; 152 of No. 37a; 162 of No. 37b; 20 of No. 38; 
2 of No 4-fl: 2 of No. 48: 2 of No. 48a: 2 of No, 48b: 1 of No. 51; 2 of No. 52; 1 oi N<>. 

53; 1 oi 

2 of Nt 

6 of Nc 

1 E06 or EO20 Electric Motor (not included in Outfit)* 




% 





MECCANO MAGAZINE 






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Handsome 




etition 




Prizes for Meccano Models 



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The winter model-building season has now commenced 

Out lit 




in earnest, and every keen owner of a 
should be busy planning his entry in our great "Autumn" 
Mod*] -building Competition. This was announced in our 
October issue. It is the first important competition of the 



When the model is built it is only necessary to obtain 
a photograph of it or, if this is not possible, a good draw- 







small photograph will 



ing. 

enough to show the 

details of the model, 




<>, 




rov 




it 







se 




indoor 
plenty of time 




season, 





is still 
home or 



appearance and important 
it is not necessary that either 

photo- 



- . ,:..::::■ :■; 



overseas to plan and prepare their entries, as the 
closinc date is 31st December. Valuable cash prizes 

be « unsoiation 

will have a 



are offered, and there 





awards, so that 




ery c o in 




splendid chance of earning recognition of his skill 



and merits 
as a Mec- 



» 



■.-.■ .■ ■ ■. ■. ■. 






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cano 



con- 






the 
of 



struct or 
For 

benefit 

readers 

who did not 

see last 

month's 
announce- 

m e n t of 
this contest 

we again 

give full 

particulars. 
The com- 



ion is a 



. 







graphs or 

drawin 
shall 
been 
pared 
the co m- 



pre- 
by 



petitor 

himself. 




. ■-■ 









com- 



petitor 
s h o u 1 d 



his 



Simple models that won prizes in 

Meccano Competitions, The group 
of billiards players shown above is 
the work of J. Willems, Antwerp, 
and the model on the left is a 



name 






reproduction by Edwin Rusted, 
Royston, of the L.N.E.R. stream- 
lined locomotive "Silver Jubilee." 



write 

age, 

and f u 1 1 
ad< 1 ress on 
the back of 
each photo- 
graph or 



drawing, and enclose it, together with 
a brief description of the model, in an 

"A uiumn Mod li- 




ves 




envelope 

Building Competition" Meccano Ltd., 

Binns Road, 




must be 



general one, that is, the models submitted may be of any 












size or 



ki 




v 



mat 



ever, the 




stipulation being 



that 



they shall be the competitor's own work. Ships, bridges, 




ives, motor cars 



machines and buildings and 



structures of all kinds are 




the 




suitable 




subjects, and any size of Meccano Outfit or any number 
parts can be used in constructing entries. There is no 
age limit, and Meccano owners living in any part of 



the world can compete on 




terms. 



this office not later 




Entries 

reach 







31st December. 



The prizes to be awarded for the most interesting and 
best built models entered include cheques and Meccano 
and Hornbv products. The complete list of these is as fol- 
lows: First Prize, Cheque for £5/5/-; Second, Cheque for 
£3/3/-; Third, Cheque for £2/2/-. There also wall be ten 

to the value 

in addition to a number of consolation 



prizes of Meccano or Hornby 




of 

awards and Certificates of Merit. 











A 




for 




of Small Outfits 



- 



9 



1 



This is a special model-building contest in which every 
owner of a Meccano Outfit can enter, for only the few- 
parts shown in the list in the panel at the foot of this page 



are 



regard 





com 



can 



subject of 




ease, himself in 



provided only the 




selected parts are used; but if he wishes he can add either 
a Clockwork Motor or an Electric Motor to drive his 






i n o 










, It is not necessary to use all 
the parts; any not needed can be 
left out. 

The more original a model is, the 

better will be its builder's chance of 

winning a prize; and all who enter 

will have the same chance of success. 

The actual model must not be 

in. A photograph or a good 

drawing is all that is required, but 



should be as clear and detailed as possible. The com- 
petitor's age, name and address must be written in block 
letters on the back of each photograph or sheet of paper 

competitors must send also a list of the parts 





used in their models 




containing 



entries 





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Build Your Model with These Parts 



4 of Part No. 1 






6 of Part No. 2 
8 of Part No. 5 
6 of Part No. 12 
3 of Part No. 16 
2 of Part No. 17 



4 of Part No. 22 

1 of Part No. 23 
1 of Part No. 24 
6 of Part No. 35 
1 of Part No. 44 



1 of Part No. 19g 1 of Part No. 52 

2 of Part No. 19b 1 of Part No. 54a 2 of Part No. 217a 




should be addressed "Selected Parts Contest/' Meccano 

Ltd., Binns Road, Liverpool 13, 

The competition will be divided 
into two sections: A, for competi- 
tors living in the British Isles; 

B, for competitors living Overseas. 

In each section there will be prizes 
of Meccano or Hornby products 
value £2/2/-; £1/1/- and 10/6 
respectively. Section A will close on 

30th November and Section B on 
31st January, 1939. 



3 of Part No. 90a 

2 of Part No. 126 

1 of Part No. 186 

4 of Part No. 187 

2 of Part No. 189 



4 of Part No. 48a 2 of Part No. 190 

2 of Part No. 192 



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THE MECCANO MAGAZINE 



649 




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£ 



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Originality" Contest (Home Section) 



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The list of prize-winners in the Home Section of the "Originality ,, 
Competition, details of which were published in the May * f JVf.M." 
is as follows: 



1st Prize, Meccano or Hornby products value £3/3/- :J. H. Smith, 
products value £2/2/-: E. D. Clements, 

Orpington. 3rd, products value £1/1/-: 

G. Sharpe, Sutton. 

Products value 10/6: R. Brash, Glasgow; 

N. Ta'Bois, Woodford Green; C. Harrison, 
Worksop; P, Wirkham, Leicester; D. 

Goodlifie, Exeter; C. Brown, Bradford. 

In awarding the prizes in this 

their 




ington. 2nd, 






Contest 

decisions 'on novelty in choice of 
subject and in the use of Meccano 

parts. Of the models submitted the 

one that possesses these features 

in the highest degree 



is 



a me- 



chanical shaving machine sent by 
J. H. Smith, Teddington. The model 
is shown in the upper illustration, 

and every reader will appreciate its 



alt hough 
venture to trv it! 




few 



would 






The essential 

machine is a 




■ 




of the 

arm mounted 
pivo tally on a movable carriage 

that runs on rails. Two Clockwork 

Motors are incorporated in the 

machine, and one of these drives the carriage backward or forward 

on the rails, while the other drives a cam mechanism that causes 

the arm to oscillate up and down. When it is desired to use the 
machine for shaving, a shaving brush is first fixed to one end of the 

arm and allowed to lather the face. The brush is then removed and 

being adjustable 




The cap is built up from two 5|"x IV Flexible Plates and a Flat 
Girder, and the filament is represented by Spring Corel. The Cord is 
supported by short lengths of fine wire, and the ends of the li lament 
are connected to Rods fixed to a main supporting column consisting 

of a 1 1 A" Rod. 

A model of Eddystone light- 
house by C, Brown, Bradford, 
also was awarded a prize of 10/6. 
' The external .features of the light- 

house are reproduced by Flexible 



• 




bolted to a 




of 



Strips, and the lamp chamber 
contains two electric lamps from 
a Meccano Lighting Set, which are 
mounted on a vertical Rod that is 

revolved slowly by .an Electric 

Motor. The lamp chamber is 
provided with four windows, and 
the lamps pass each window 
are switched on for a short 
. The apparatus for switch- 
ing the lamps on and off consists 
of four insulated terminals, one of 




which is 
window. 



fixed 





beneath each 
vertical shaft 



A novel mechanical shaver designed and built by J. H. Smith, Teddington, who 

was awarded First Prize in the "Originality" Contest. 



revolves, a Crank fixed to it makes 



contact with eac 




terminal in 



replaced 




a razor, the angle of the blade 



while the machine is in motion. 
The model is of course of no 



value, and owes its success in this Contest 



turn, thus completing the electric 

circuits to the lamps at the appropriate periods. Current for the 
lamps is supplied by a small dry battery. 

P. Wick ham, Count est horpe, Leicester, built a fine model of the 
Tower of* Empire at the Glasgow Exhibition. The model is 3 ft. 5 in. 
high and I ft. 4 in, wide at the base. It is constructed chiefly from 



Angle Girders and Strips, while Strip Plates are used for making the 




observation galleries at the top and 




to form the roof of the 




to 




originality and neat con- 



struction. 



Second Prize was awar 




to E. IX 



Clements, Orpington, for the fine model 

telescope shown in the lower illustration. 
The tube of the telescope is built up from 

12 A* Strips, winch are fastened at one end 
to a 6" Circular Plate, and at the other end 
to a ring of 12f" Strips. The tube is sup- 
ported in the mounting by means of a Rod 
passed through its centre, and the elevation 
of the 




e is controlled by a hand- 
wheel, which is geared to two Roller Races 

bolted to the sides of the telescope tube. 
The model is complete with sidereal clock, 
declination ring and observation bed, the 



latter being constructed between the two 
supporting pillars. 

An adjustable Limp holder of the angle- 
poise type used for close-up illumination of 
work in engineering workshops formed the 
subject of a neatly built model that won 

Third Prize for Geoffrey Sharpe, Sutton. 
In the model the lamp is represented by a 
Boiler, which is mounted pivotally at the 
end of a jointed arm. The arm is built up 
from Angle Girders, arid is loaded with 
Springs so arranged that they balance the 
arm in any position. At its lower end the 



arm is fixed to a vertical pillar supported 




restaurant. A realistic effect has been ob- 
tained by placing a few Hornby Poplar 
Trees, Dinky Toys Motor Cars and minia- 



ture figures around the base of the model. 



j- 



\ 




er 



prize-winner who found his 

ire Exhibition was R. 





subject in the 

Brash, Pollokshields, Glasgow, whose model 

represents one of the Lister a uto-cars 

for passenger transport in the exhibition 

grounds. The cars are electrically driven, 

and the seats are placed along the sides. 



■m 




of 

Sharp Eyes" Contest No. 1 



The Manual models from 






in the illustration of 

-MA of 



fragments 

a liner that appeared on page 

the June "M.M." are taken, are as follows: 

Model No. 0.12, Electric Truck; Model No. 2.1, 
Railway Footbridge; Model No. 2.10. Roll Top Desk; 
Model No. 2.16, Steamship; Model No. 3.5, Noah's 
Ark; Model No. 3.M25, Tractor and Harrow; Model 
No. 4.8, Elevated Jib Crane; Model No, 4.16, Traction 
Engine; Model No. 4.17, River Gun Boat; Model No. 
4,18, Six Wheeled Steam Wagon; Model No. 5.18, 
Racing Yacht (2 pieces); Model No. 5.24, Pithead 
Gear; Model No. 6.9, Tramcar (2 pieces); Model No. 
6.10, Liner (2 pieces); Model No 

Brid " 




K15f 



Model No. 6,15, 



14, Sydney Harbour 
Galleon; Model No. 6.4, 



Breakdown Lorry, 

Many competitors succeeded in identify- 



ing all the fragments correctly, and 



Model of a meridian telescope, by E. D. Clements, Orpington 



the prizes were awarded as follows, in 
accordance with the conditions set out in 





awarded prizes of 10/6 was a 




a ball bearing inside the base of the model. 

of the most interesting models among those that were 

outline representation of an 

electric bulb. This unusual entry was submitted by X. Ta'Bois, 

Woodford Green, and is about three times the size of an 
bulb. The outline of the bulb is formed by Strips bolted end to end, 

compound strip so formed being curved to the required shape. 























the competition announcement 

1st Prize, Meccano or Hornby products value £3/3/-: R- Biggs, Bristol. 2nd, products 
value £2/2/-: C, Barnard, Johannesburg. 3rd, products value £1/1/-: R. Roddick, 
Rosario de Santa Fo, Argentine- 

■ * - 

Products value 10/-: H. Johnston, Southall; H. Hussey, St Helens; C. Keckok, 
Singapore; A/Abdulrahim, Karachi, India; F. Cooper, London SAW 19* 

Products value 5/-: H. Thomas, Kdgware; R. Hughes, Llanbedrgoch; N. Ta'Bois, 
Woodford Green; C. \Y ray ford, Bovey Tracey; S« Mcachem, Birmingham* 



650 








MAGAZINE 




CI 






U 





Entries m "M.M." Model-Building Contests 

The reports now coming in from the clubs show that members 
generally are settling well clown to the usual pursuits of the indoor 
season. Model- 1 > u ikling is the activity to which the greatest amount 
of time is devoted, and models both large and small are 
built for competitions, and also for Exhibitions. 

should not overlook the splendid model- 
that are a n n o u n ced i a t he Maga z i n e . I d o not * 
think that members of Meccano Clubs yet 
show up sufficiently well in the lists of prize- 
winners in these contests. Specially attrac- 
tive ~ — -**•.■*— »,.„>..,... . , 

and 





A Meccano Clu 





Organ Ba 




Membership of the Maylands (Western Australia) M.C. must be 
splendid fun, judging by the long and interesting letters I receive 
from Mr, V. Malmgreen, the Leader, for every pursuit that a keen 
and active boy can wish for seems to be included in the programme. 
Now the club has formed its own mouth organ band, and it is easy 

to realise from the 








ions are now peing orga 
two interesting innovations are the 

. - - , ■ 

introduction of cash prizes and the exten- 
sion of the time limit to allow the design and 



Meccano Club Leaders 

No. 95. Mr. S. McCready 




1 1 ih- 




construction of really 
There must be hundreds of Meccano models 
built at club meetings that would make a 
very good show indeed in these contests, and 

urge Leaders to arrange for these to be 



I 

submitted. If desired, the entries of several 
members of a club can be collected by the 

Leader and forwarded in one envelope, pro 
v ' * m 





the general rules are followed. 
The success p,f a member in a Magazine 



com 




is good 




and this 




should be borne in mind. From the club 

view it is even better as an en- 
couragement to members generally to give 
o 





eir best in all club work. A good plan to 
follow is to select the best models shown in 
club events as entries in ".1/. .1/7' contests. 




Thus a double incentive to good model - 
building is prov" " 

Fun for the Christmas Season 








ristmas will soon be with us, and pre- 

~ " ' Concerts and 

Socials that mark this season of the year 
should be taken in hand immediately, if 

been sta rted , I f 

an Exhibition of 





they have not 

possible there should 

some kind and a Social, the former for the 

benefit of parents "and friends and the 

latter for the members themselves. 

In all good clubs members are thorough.lv 




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amuse- 




please grown-up people who lire in any way con- 



to their hours of fun and 
rnent, and the Christmas Social or 
provides the best means of ensuring this. 
The Exhibition will 

nected with the club, and every effort should be made to'gh'e'them 
a good time also in return for their unfailing support. 

I have often made suggestions in regard to Exhibitions, and need 
not repeat them. All that I wish to say now is that whatever is 

be well done. The models and other tiling's on view 



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'. faces seen on the photograph on the 

opposite page that the members of the band 
are thoroughly enjoying their novel enter- 
prise. Those who listen to them also have 

really good times, for efficiency is the key- 
note of all Maylands M.C. activities, and the 



boys have become 
services are aire 



so 




in 



capable that their 

at 











concerts of all kinds and they have figured 



with great success in the programme of the 

local broadcasting station 6 PR. 



Thev 



e 



is a great deal to be said for a 



venture of this kind, if only with the idea of 
enlivening club meetings, Exhibitions and 



Open 



N ml its 



and I strongly recommend 



Leaders of other 



>s to proceed on similar 



lines if this is at all possible. What can be 

done may be realised from the fact that 

when the Maylands 'Mouth Organ Band was 



Mr. S. McCready was the founder of the Islandmagee 
M.C. f of which he is Leader and secretary. This 
Northern Ireland club was affiliated in January 

. The chief activities have included model- 




building, which is carried on enthusiastically, 

games, rambles and treasure hunts, and the work 
of the club has aroused great interest locally* long 
reports of meetings appearing regularly in the Press. 



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formed 




of its me 






nothing about music, yet in a few months 
they were able to give public performances 

that aroused admiration and interest and 

spread the fame of the club abroad. 



Events 




The first Exhibition of the Edinburgh 

Monday, 

33, 




Hobbies M.C *\ 

7th November 

Lauriston Place, ltdinburgh3, and will con- 

tinue until Saturday, 12th November, the 

hours being from 6,30 p.m. to 10 p.m. each 

night. In addition to the club's extensive 
miniature railway there will be a splen 
display of model boats and aeroplanes, 

with exhibits by the Woodwork, 





and other Sections, 
show a film of club 
activities. Refreshments also will be avail- 
able. The charge for admission will be 6d. for 
adults, 3d. for schoolboys. 

Another Exhibition to be held this month 



is that of the St, Stephen's 




M.C. 






This has been arranged for Saturday, 26th November, in the Saltash 

Guild Hall. There will be a display of models built by members, 

and the club's Hornby ~ " '" * ' .. — *?-- t-. , ..__, , 

will be available. The 






8.0 



p.m 



and the 



charge 



care on 



some 



should be well constructed, and arranged with 
definite plan instead of merely being strewn about on tables. If 
possible some form of entertainment should be included as part of 
the Show. For instance a film or lantern lecture could he shown. If 
there is a club band, such as the Mouth Organ Band to which I have 
referred elsewhere on this page, this could be pressed into service, or 
members or friends with musical inclinations might be persuaded to 

background. Most important of all, members 
rioM-^e ;„ -» a-;,.„/iu. manner, making: sure that 






3d, for those under 14 years of age. 



'ay will be in operation. Refreshments 

ition will be open from 2,0 p.m. to 

for admission will be 6d. for adults, 






Proposed Clubs 



provide a musical 



should greet their visitors in a 



they all 




at 



■ : 




immediately they enter the Exhibition. 



Attempts are being made to establish Meccano clubs in the 
following place, and boys interested should communicate with 




promoters, 




names and addresses are givt-n below: 



Birmingham — Mr. L. Brook, 197, Mover Road, Small Heath. 
London — W. J. .McDowell, 33, Canrobert Street, Bcthnal Green, E.2. 

■Hhi a^ amm t^fr ■^•^a ■ ^ am __■ Jk j«_ ^m am am i m. *w ™*_ 4 



Da genu am — R. M. Tindal, 1 




\V 





xforij— ■ C. East, "Woodiield," 2S, Rose Hill, Oxford. 



Avenue, Dagenham 



># 



a 



I 



" 



r 



n 




MECCANO MAGAZINE 



651 







Hornsea MX, — -Several outdoor meetings have been 
held, and members greatly enjoyed a boat trip on the 
Mere, where they "explored" Swan Island* Members 

have also enjoyed trips on the new Bom sea boating 
takes* A Visit to Hull Gas Works proved very interest- 
ing The Winter programme has been settled by dis- 
cussion among Officials and members, several of whom 
have volunteered to give talks. At one meeting an 
account of a visit to the Empire Exhibition, Glasgow, 
is to be given. Club roll: 15, Secretary: P, Richardson, 





Folkestone MX. — A party of members had an 
enjoyable time at the local Regatta, which culminated 
in a firework display, # lhe model yacht constructed by 
members behaved very well when tried out recently. 

The ^ construction of a motor launch is now under 

consideration* and this will probably be carried out 

during the Winter Sessions. A 
model liner is to be made for 
the new harbour at l4 Folke- 
stone" On the model railway 
layout, and a new type of crane 
is being evolved for the same 
purpose. Club roll: 7. Secretary; 
?« F. Cotter, B% t Hill 
Folkestone. 
Sid Vale MX.— During a 

ramble across Muttern Moor 

the opportunity was taken of 

holding an informal discussion 

on the Winter programme. 
This was event ually decided at 

tin* Annual General Meeting, 

and is now being carried out. 

Club roll; 20, Secretary: L. R. 1, 

on* Sheffield House, Sid- 

mon th . 



new officers have been elected. Club roll; 34. Secretary*: 

J). C. Lambert, 23 f Charlton Lane, Charlton, London 




en's 



(Saltash) MX.— Members of the 
Meccano Section have constructed a Hannoxiograph for 
display at the Exhibition to be held this month. 
Excellent progress has been made with general models, 
and the engine shed of the llornbv Kailw&v layout 
has been fitted with a glass roof. The model carriage 
washing plant has been given an imitation rough-cast 
finish and steady, if slow, progress is Wing made with a 
model cattle dock. Club roll: 5. Secretary: B. Braund, 
9, Homer Park, Saltash. 

Wednesbury MX,— The club rooms have been 
orated and are now very attractive. 



redecorated and are now very attractive. Visits, 
Debates^ Talks and Games Nights at which refresh- 
ments will be served, have been arranged for the 




se, 21 > Victoria Street. Glandore, South Australia. 

Maylands MX* — An Exhibition has been held, 

outstanding models being a railwav breakdown crane, 

a jack-knife bridge, and a truck and trailer constructed 

by a 1 liml mtnil .it, A pap* n Ikim\ with the. L^aadt r as 

hare, developed into a treasure hunt, which was greatly 
enjoyed. At IntiT-Faction Debates sucli subjects as 
*>ls War Worth While?" and "Should Iks School Lmvitig 
Agi be Raised?" have been discussed. A cycle run to 
North Beach was greatly enjoyed. Quoits and Darts 
have been introduced* and are so popular that they 
now figure in the Faction Tournaments, Club roll: 36. 
Secretary: R* Le Chemiiiajit, 60, Crawford Road, 
Mavlands, W. Australia, 
Melbourne MX, — Further 




"training* 1 mec 
for new member* have been held, and one "Apprentice 11 
successfully lard out and wired the und 








teams led by the 




r 




St. Oswald's MX.— A sp* 

meeting was devoted to holiday 

reminiscences and a discussion 
on recruiting, which ended in a 

resolve to launch a recruiting 
campaign. A Darts Match 

fcen 
Leader and secretary respec- 

y resulted in a victory for 

the latter. A gentleman Very 

f organised a film show for 

numbers, which they greatly 
enioyed. At the Annual General 
Meeting satisfactory reports 
were Riven of the year's activi- 
ties, and officials were elected. 
Club roll: 25, Secretary: J. F. 
Taniies, "EIraoIino," 5, Ingram 

Road, Thornton Heath. 

Edinburgh Hobbies MX. 
Over 21)0 members have now been recruited, and a 
nirftkr urn -du> ixpected to join durinu Qic present 

Winter Sessions. Club activities rover a wide range. 
Kadb and Photographic Sections have been formed; 
the latter has a fully-equipped darkroom and full 
facilities for developing, print inp and enlarging. Visits 
are to be a weekly feature of the Branch programme, 
which also includes monthly Demonstration Talks and 
monthly film shows, An Exhibition is to be held this 
month. Details are given on the opposite para. Club 

roll: 206. Secretary: C> 5. Morrison, 28, Wellington 

Street, Edinburgh 7. 

Stratford Public Libraries MX.— Meetings have 
been devoted to Model-bunding, Debater, Games and 
Competitions. An interesting 1 bate on "Stwuhf Cycle 
Tracks he Provided on Our Main Streets?' 9 was deeidt-d 

tests have 




-action of the electric railway, 
afterwards running trains on it- 
Other members have been 



given practice in train control 



on the 



lavout: inter 




ma in 

change of positions during track 

working has greatlv increased 

members* efficiency. At full 
club meetings extensive time* 
table working has been carried 
out on the electric lavout. 

New steel track has been 

to replace tinplate 
sections wherever possible. A 

of members paid a 
visit to the Scotch College 
Hobbies Exhibition, where the 
Leader judged the 
models. Club roll: 10. Secretary: 
L. Ison, 8, Hayes Street, 
Northrote, Melbourne K. 16, 
letona. 






EGYPT 







Zagazig and 
>i- Building 



Misr MX. 
Contest 



A 



an 



nounred in the club magazine 

<* !*_*-„■■ attracted many 




The Mouth Organ Band of tbe Maylands (Western Australia} MX. The Band was formed carlv this year by 
Mr. V. Malmgreen, Leader of this enterprising club, and its murabers have already become so skilful that they 
have been able to play with great success at socials and concerts, and have been heard in radio programmes. 





mes played. Good 



Miss F. 




in favour of the tracks. 

been held, and observation sa 

progress has been made in the compiling of club scrap 

books, A Stamp Club meeting was devoted to methods 

of writing up stamp collections, and several albums 
were compared. Club roll: :*5. Secretary: 
Scattergood, Public Library, Technical Institute, 

Road/ Old Tra fiord, Manchester 16. 

Winchmore Hill Coilegialc School MX.— Excellent 
progress is being made with the i tub's Hornby Railwav, 
more than half the track of which has now liecrji laid 
down. In a "Simplicity** Contest the first prize was 
awarded to the builder of a working model of a Diabolo. 
A Shunting Contest has been held, the winner 
his nearest rival by two minutes* A Variety Show is 
to be given at the end of the present session. Club 
roll: 28, Secretary; F. J. I learn, 143, Conway Road, 
Souihgate, London 1ST. 14. 

Old Charlton MX*— At the Opening Night of the 

to new 



present sessions. The Woodwork Section is specially 
active- Tools have been re-ground and bookcases, 
card index files and a desk are being made. Club roll: 15. 

M. L. Done, 31 1 Wa verity Road, Darlaston, 
Wednesbury, Staffs. 

Middlesbrough MX.- — The winter programme is now 
wrll under way, and some excellent model building is 
being accomplished. The lighter side of club life is not 
being neglected, and plans are in hand for a Parents' 
whist drive and for a "Ghost Ni^ht* 1 that promises to 
be both exciting and amusing. New members are 



A 



interesting entries. An interest- 
ing Lecture on "The Question of 
Loose Tyres" has been given bv 

Mr. R. II. Razek, of the Egypti- 
an State Railways. A film show 
was given at the Annual General 
Meeting, and the Stamp Section 
has held several meetings. 
An Exercise Section has been 
formed under the guidance of 
Mr. H. Mangourie. A partv of 
members spent an enjoyable 
tune in camp near Alexandria. Club roll: '24. Secretary: 
A. S. Mangourie, 13, Sharia Badir, Zeitoun, Cairo. * 



INDIA 



Raniit M.C. 



wanted, and the secretary will be pleased to hear from 
Mi-ccano enthusiasts in the district who would like to 
join. Secretary: G, Brn< khurst, 49, Hevthrop Drive, 
Aeklam, Middlesbrough. 

The Beeches M.C— Publication of the September 
issue of the chib magazine "Our Man" coincided with 

the opening of the winter terra, and this was used to 
introduce the club to many boys, some of whom have 
become members. It is hoped to arrange an interesting 
series of Lantern Lectures, as these are always verv 
popular. An exhibition held in conjunction with the 
school ca mera club proved very successful Preparations 
are already in hand for a Christmas Partv Secretary: 

H. Dubras, 14, Broad Street, Jersey, C.I. 

AUSTRALIA 











present session club proceedings were cxpla 
members. Th*- Annual General Meeting has been held, 
reports being submitted on the progress of th»> club and 



Thebarton M.C. —A synchronous electric motor 
constructed in Meccano has proved very satisfactory 
in operation, although very careful adjustment was 
required. The Vice- President has given a Lecture on 
"The New Guinea Goldfiehls" illustrating it bv means of 
an epidiascope. Two films have been shown, 

subjects being "The Making of Conxrav Stewart Pern 

and u The Port Pirie Swelters*' respectively. An illus- 

talk bv the President 






*..» a ■ . ... ?' Ith "Modern 

Atrcraft." Arrangements are in hand for a series of 

Model-building Contests. Club roll; Kit, Secretary: B. S. 



Regular meetings have been held, both 
indoors and out-of-doors. One aitemoon was devoted to 
an enjoyable ramble in the nearbv hilts. Metre gauge 

locomotives were examined on another occasion. Much 
time has been devoted to photography, and several 
films of a scientific nature have been displa ved. A visit is 
to be made to a dry ice factory. Club roll: i0. Secretary: 
A. Singh, Krishen, Nagar, Lahore. 

NEW ZEALAND 

Ashburhm M.C.— Regular Model -building Com- 
petitions have been keenlv contested. The Osborne 
Model- building Cup was won by T. Taylor, who has been 
prominent in recent model-buitding activities. Good use 
is being made of the club's two mechanical fretsaws. 
An Inter Club Debate was held with the Christ church 
M.C, the visitors successfully supporting the motion 

That Road Transport is Superior to That oUhe Rail- 

Prep.1 rations are In hand for the next Shield Con- 
test, and arrangements also are being made for the 
Parents" Night. Several new members have been en- 
rolled, and duly presented with their badges and 
certificates. Club roll: 26. Secretary: E. Lewis, Havelock 

Sill ' 

tre<-t, Ashburton. 

Chrislchurch MX.— Mr. E. A. Gay is acting tempor- 
arily as I eadcr. Various duties have been allotted to 
members! and thus all are now sharing in the mainten- 
ance of the clubroorn. Attendances have been good, and 
several new numbers have been enrolled. Regular visits 
have been paid to the School for the Blind at Sumner, 
various forms of entertainment being givaii by members. 
I he club Magazine continues to flourish. Club roll: 43' 
Secretary: S. S. Stringer, 250, Oxford Terrace, Christ- 
church C.l. 



€i 




rr 










"> 



? 




MECCANO MAGAZINE 








DannDDDnnnnnanDannnnnnannnannnnnannDDaanDnnnnnnnDnnaanDnnnnnnnnDn 

a 
a 
a 

D 

□ 

a 

nannnnnnnnnnnnnannnnna 

SPECIAL feature of the L.M.S. Centenary Exhibition at 

Huston was a model showing the station as it was in 1838. This 

formed part of the indoor section of the Exhibition, as explained in 



Travel in 




and 



To 




□ 
□ 

□ 
□ 

□ 

□ 
□ 

□ 
□ 





located to-day. Another was 




about half-way 



along 



the 





on page 552 of last month's "A/.JV/." It attracted close 
attention from all visitors, who were keen to compare the modern 

In this they were 

1 Birming- 
a train of 



platform just outside the roof, the platform being cut away at this 
point to accommodate it; and the third was beyond the outer ends 



of the platforms. At this point, besides connecting the four tracks 
together, the turntables also served to lead 







and trains with those of 100 years ago. 
helped by the presence of a model of a modern London and 
ham express running on a track round the replica of a 






1838 in the old station. 






The complete model is the v 




of 




noted firms, Twining 



Models Ltd. beinsj responsible for the historical section and Basse tt- 

The display is effectively 



Lowke Ltd. for 




m 





ern equi 
the model of Euston in 1838 being arran 





planned on two leve . ,,,.--. 

on the higher level. On the side facing the onlooker this section is 
made as if supported by a retaining wall, and alongside this wall at a 

_ «. .Bl 






lo we r 




is the contmu-ms 



track on which ran 



mi ma 



coach shed 
established at Euston for the stabling and repair of the passenger 
vehicles. This shed and its yard were placed between the station and 
the overbridge, then carrying Wriothesley Street over the line. This 
bridge and its approaches form the right-hand end of the model. 

The finish of the various buildings and structures in the model is 
excellent. They have the air of solidity that was characteristic of the 
large-scale construction of the London and Birmingham line, and 
there is a freshness about them, too, that leaves no doubt that they 
must have had a most imposing appearance when they were new. 

Standing on the departure track near the station is an exact 

reproduction 



of one of the 



t ure express of 1 938. This track 
is only in view along this one 
side of the model, for it turns 
inward and passes into tunnel 

mouths at each end 

continuous 




Birmingham 

as 
in a 

x>rary 

•IT j j.* 

illustration 

in 




line by Osborne, the 

well- 



Guide." 

This train is headed by one of the 






section. 

page gives a very 

the whole arrangement 

At the left- 
hand 
the mod i-l is a 





reproduction 

of the 

famous Doric 
Portico 

ming 
ent ranee 

to 

tion , 

literally 
"Gateway 

the 

This was built 

up 
realist! c 

■ 

manner, with 

charac- 



o Bury locomotives, 
bar frames and a 




covered 

covering of the boiler 

wooden lagging commonly 

are a 



On the open foo 
miniature driver and fireman in the regulation dress of 




Behind the tender, 



four-wheeled 



come two first-class carriages. Then there is a 
truck- carrying a brougham, 




was a new 




vehicle 
100 years ago. There follows a 



second-class open carnage, 

conveyed first-class 



lastly the mail coach, 




the 




taper- 



Tbe upper illustration shows the model described on this page, with the modern 
train running round the historical section; below it a train of 1838 is seen outside 
the original Euston. Photographs by courtesy of Bassett-Lo* ke Ltd., Northampton. 



which 

Some difficulty was experienced in discovering the 
correct colours for the coaches, but it was 





that some of the first-class carriages of 1838 had their 

shade to the 



lower panels painted green 



of a 




ing fluted columns and other 





. 



.ures 




e 




reproduced. Judgin 

line appearant it- 
Hard wick 



bv the model the original must have had a very 
when it could be seen as its A ~* iau:M46 






ssigner 
it to be seen without hindrance from 




ip 
the 



structures that now surround it. A point of detail in which there is a 





were 

if 



lagging of the boilers and tenders of the engines. Other coj 
red, as were also the mail coaches, and the second- 
were all varnished oak. Besides the brougham on the carriage truck, 







difference from to-day is that the word "Euston 
above the columns; this was not added until 1870. Three of the four 

flanking the entrance are modelled, 










lodge-type buildings ong m 

together with the gates between them. On the real gates are still to 
be found the coat-of-arms of the London and Birmingham Railway. 
At nrst Euston had only two platforms, which seem then to have 

'* one being for departure and 




or 




been known as wr . , _ ,-■,*♦ 

the other for arrivals. Of these the departure stage was bounded by a 
block of buildings comprising the booking offices and waiting rooms, 



which has yellow panels, there is another on the approach road or 

' _ -way on the arrival side with a dapple grey horse in the 
shafts? This carriage has panels of blue. 

The feature about the model which 
gives it interest and "life" is the large number of miniature figures, 
nearly 100 in all, in correct costume of the period. The brilliant 
colouring of the dresses of some of the "ladies*' adds greatly to the 
picturesque effect. All the coaches have a reasonable complement of 
passengers, manv of them looking with interest out of the windows, 






p — — — - - — ^ — — j— ^ — — — ■ — — — - — — - — ^^ 

and brakesmen are riding in the seats provided for them upon the 



and in the model this block forms the edge on this side. The plat- 
forms or parades were covered by what was then described as "a 
spacious shedding 1 ' arranged in two bays, the building previously 
referred to forming a support for one side of one of the bays. J he 

was carried by metal arches on a row of columns, and the same 
arrangement was in use on the arrival side, where there were no 








buildings. In the model this arrangement is followed exactly, and the 

re *Ntf +ii*» arriv:il sMr with its carriaee-wav allows 






• ■•_ 





of the arrival side with its carriage-way 

the interior of the miniature station to be seen perfectly. 
There are four tracks between the platforms, and these are con- 

" a favourite method in the early day- 




's 



nected by small T 

when the tables were known as "turnplates. 1 here were three sets 
f these in the original station at Euston. One was placed at the 

where the buffer stops would be 



o 



inner extremity of the 




roofs of the carriages. A special feature of these little "people' is 

they are all apparently doing something, and have not the 
appearance of being mere dummies. 

The permanent way, upon which the old train stands, is almost 
exactly a facsimile in miniature of the original. The rails are of a light 
pattern carried in chairs without wooden keys. These chairs are 
spiked down to imitation stone sleepers. 

Of the modern equipment, the track is of standard bullhead rail 
supported in chairs on wooden sleepers with a properly-ballasted 
road bed. The train that runs upon this is ma 
coaches hauled by a miniature "Royal Scot" locomotive and is 
typical of the series of expresses performing the journey between 
Euston and Birmingham in under two hours. Near the entrance 
to one of the tunnels is a signal of the two-aspect colour light 
type controlling the running of the train. 




e up of live bogie 



4 



* 



« 



a 














MAGAZINE 




i 



..*> 



* 



r 



nDnnDnnDnnnnDnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnn 




D 
D 

D 
D 

D 

D 





on 



Road-Rail 





Miniature 





HE use of containers for freight traffic is an important 
feature of modern railway operation. The "suitcase of 

named, is 



commerce. 



as 




container has been 





separate 




or van 







can 




e 



conveyed equally easily on a railway truck or a road lorry, 
so that with it there is no need for transhipment of freight 

wagon, or vice versa. 




road 




to 




Various types are in use, and each is distinguished by an 



mi 




such 



a 





■ * 



A 



u 







e, 




*r 



B 



ft 




With the introduction of mi 




*pe 







so on 



ture Containers into the 



Hornby System some time ago it became possible to re- 
produce this kind of traffic on model railways. Great fun 



is to be obtained by the 



in ordinary open Wagons also would look very effective. 



Steel container construction is represented 




the 



Hornby L.N.E.R. Goods Container. This is typical of the 

±f - I 

real "IV type, which is intended for miscellaneous goods 

appear equally well on all kinds of 

in the 



traffic, and it 





both passenger 






is 




s 





L.N.E.R. red oxide used for brake- fitted 
piped wagons. The lettering is in yellow, and the appear- 
ance of the 




title of the company on the Container 
sides makes a change from the bare initials "N.F." that 

■ 

are familiar distinguishing marks on most of the freight 






equi 




belonging to the L.N.E.R 




aint.TS 





and 




* v r . • 



v 




a s 





s- 



tem of 
port on a Hornby Rail- 
way, and as the practice 
of each of the four great 
companies is represent- 
ed by a different kind of 
Container there is 

plenty of varietv in the 



traffic that 

ii" ■> ■ 

handled. H 
tainers are 



c a 1 1 



be 



or 







close 




originals, 



and 



t h e 



amount of detail includ- 
ed in their design is re- 

their 
the 
o f 






markable 
transport 

Flat TrucI 

the 

ideal, 

the vehicles used for 




Series is 
typical of 




other kinds can be seen 

on what is 

the 
famous freight train on 

thr L.N.E.R. 






the " 

Braked 

King's Cross, It provides 

a rapid service between 
London, intermediate 






destinations, delivering 

its freight in Edinburgh 
and 




the morning 

its 





arture from 

don. A miniature 
Scotsman." as the train 



*4 






3.35 



IS 



so m 





nown 




ic 



a 







t his 



b 




actual 



An express goods train on a Hornby L.N.E.R. layout, 

and mounted on Flat Trucks are 




TwoS.R. Containers conveying "through traffic 

* next to the tender of I he engine* 



practice. Its low sides are fitted with small rings to which 




during transit 




means 



Containers can be 

> 

of Meccano Cord. 

The Hornby L.M.S. Container is a model of what is 
known as the "K" type, which is intended principally for 
the carriage of furniture and similar purposes. Its 
reproduces the timber construction with vertical boarding 
of the original, and all the details of the real thing are 






ed. The colouring is attractive, with the ironwork, 

such as the strappings on the sides and the door fittings, in 

in yellow, giving 






all 

effect on the back 




of L.M.S 





* 








One of these Containers loaded on a Flat Truck can 
form part of a passenger or a goods train. Several furni- 
ture containers are sometimes seen together in 

practice when the complete removal of some large estab- 
lishment is being carried out. Estate or farm effects, stock 
and implements are sometimes moved together from one 
part of the country to the other. In miniature a special 
"removal" train of this kind would make an interesting 
variation from the usual programme. One or two furniture 
Containers on Flat Trucks could be accompanied by 



train to run 

. D 

Hornby System repre- 
senting the L.N.E.R. Its 
load could consist. of Containers mounted on Flat Trucks, 
Vans of various kinds, and if necessary an Open Wagon or 
two, possibly provided with a Hornby Wagon Tarpaulin. 



The G.W.R. Container represents 




f C 



FX" tyi^e use 




for perishable traffic, particularly the transport of frozen 






meat imported from overseas. It is finished in white, as is 

M. 

frequently the case with refrigerated equipment, and the 

. This contrast gives 




ering and fittings are in 
the Container a most effective 




The G.W.R. 



1 1 







>t 





amer can 




in the 



composition of miniature freight "lliers" representing the 
meat trains running from ports and other centres direct to 
Smithfteld Market. In addition to their use for the con- 







perishable foodstuffs 

are employed 







fruit and so on 



con veyance 




other delicate loads such as bulbs. 






The Hornby S.R. Container is of the €, M' 



> 




e, which 







Cattle 





sev 

Tractor and similar items 



livestock, and a 




on 




in real practice is a ventilated container for the convey- 
ance of perishables that require to be kept cool, but for 
which refrigeration is unnecessary. The real ones are used 

between the West 

of the real "M" 

effective finish of 




extensively for 
Country and London, 
containers are reproduced, 

S.R. 



























654 






THE MECCANO MAGAZINE 




DINKY TOYS ON HORNBY 







T7VERY owner of a 




Railway should have 



I 



Jj/Dinkv Tovs on his layout, for onlv by their use can he 
make this look as busy and realistic as an actual line. He 

them in the station, in sidings and shunting yards, 

ins; and this article 



station. For example, the two Hikers can be shown on or 

s; the Business Man can appear in the roads 



near 





or streets alongside the railway; and the Woman and Child 



ne 

alon 

deal 




the lineside and in signal 
s with the best way to include them to obtain 



can be used at any 
sight, that of a youn 







spot to 





uce a familiar 




ns. 



>* 




good effects. 

First and most important of the 










necring Staff of 1 >ink\ 



r$ 




way use are the miniature figures that give life to 
station platforms and railway premises generally. These 
little people are grouped 



in 





but each figure 

separately, 
co n veni- 

the 

Hornby Railway owner 



Toys Set No. 4 can be 
points along the line. The Electrician 
and the Fitters can be used as signal maintenance staff, 
and might be placed in the neighbourhood of one or other 
of the Signal Cabins on the line, as if engaged in routine 

tests and repairs. These 

men are suitable also for 




s is a 




ence, for it 





his "staff 












9 



in- 





systems 



req uirc more 
drivers and porters than 




st at ion masters 
and there is no dimculU 
in arranging for this, or 

* i * • i m 



in 



m a king 



similar ad 



j ust men ts. 

Railwavmen of vari- 

•utt' 

ous classes are repre- 

by the Station 
Staff of Dinky Toys Set 





placin 






in 







neigh 




bpurhood of large sta- 
tions. Engine Sheds and 
similar establishments 
require to be 
The Fitters, 

i n d Engineroom 
Attendant are provided 

this purpose, and 






and 



the 




keeper also will be useful 









w 




a 




. * 



ure is made of the 

Company's' 1 road 



motor services. 




Other splendid plat 



n 



No, 1 , in which there are 

gures. A little care 



are the 
Train and Hotel Staff of 



1 1 '^ures 





A busy scene at a miniature goods depot. The Railway Mechanical Horse and Trailer units, Dinky 

Toys Mo. 33R, arc ideal for use in conjunction with railway freight services. 



Set 




T 



o. 5. This includes 



a Conductor and two 




be taken over their arrangement, on the platform 
or elsewhere, to make sure that each has his right place 
in the scheme. The upper photograph on page 655 shows 



Waiters, who are principally inten 



j. 





use in con- 



nection with Pullman services, but can be employed also 




how 






ti 



inures 



can be 



they can be arranged. 

than those for which they are 



oses 




designed. For instance, the Station master can supervise 

Platform, and Porters can be 




on 



the 




employed in the handling of freight in addition to their 



normal employment 



in 








Stations. 



A familiar figure on real station platforms is reproduced 
by the Newsboy of Dinky Toys Set No. 3, who is men- 
tioned first in order to distinguish him from the Passcn- 

up the rest of this Set. In the photograph 

already referred to he is in a prominent position in 

of the bookstall on the station platform. He can 







also be placed effectively near a train at the platform, as if 

M-. ta* - - ji * 

l.t already 




to 




le 




of some 




In addition to their use in stations, the ordinary 

placed very effectively outside the 




can 




as train attendants when no Pullmans are run, 
in other similar capacities. 

The Farmyard Animals of Set No. 2 have various uses. 
They can appear in the lineside fields either separately or 
in groups, and they can also be placed in the goods yard 
when livestock traffic is being dealt with. The Horse can 
be pressed into the service of the railway for light shunt- 



ing 



purposes 





ons \\ 




e 




the employment of a 
locomotive for the purpose would not be worth 
while. This would be quite in order, for horses are still 
used in this manner in real practice. Meccano Cord could 

I J ■ J 

Uirther length 

miniature 



be used for the necessarv harness, 






same ma 



haulin 





m 







a 



a suite 











The road side arrangements of 





ons vary 



according to conditions on different layouts and the space 







In most 
of the 




it is possible to make 



Dink^ 




No, 46. 



.. 



% 



* 



' 



4 



* 



r 




MECCANO MAGAZINE 



655 



The sections contained in this 











effect on miniature roads, and it is also possible to employ 
them on the railway itself where a paved way is required, 




such as in goods yards, at terminal stations, in 
sidings and so on. The Road Signs of Set No. 47 and the 





Beacons 

■ 

quired, together with 









will be re 



Motor Wagon, 








No 



5 A, also is useful. 



Of the various Delivery Vans, No. 28C, the "Manchester 

Guardian "■ 

with 




is particularly suitable for use in con- 








services. 










the Police, R.A.C. and 
A. A. figures, and other 



e or two of these 

■ 

vehicles can be employed very effectively in connection 

with the running of newspaper traffic, which forms an 

night-time 

rail- 

— ■ 

of course 




com 




of 



Sets 



Nos. 42, 43 and 44. 




some layouts , 



special attention 



is 



given 




the 




ment of road motor 









services. To cope with 

requirements 

a variety of vehicles is 




necessary, and this is 
provided in the Dinky 
Toys Scries. The most 
suitable road vehicles 
are the Railway Me- 
chanical Horses and 

■ 

Trailer Vans, Dinky 
Toys No. 33R. Me- 
chanical horse units 




activity on th 



ways 

are 






in 



a 



passenger station, and 
if several of them can 
be arranged in a rank 

— 




I 






ey gi v e a r em a 



realistic 



air 




premises. The Taxi, 
Dinky Toys No. 36G, 

meet the needs of 

owners in this 





interesting and 
effective novelty would 

be to use Dinky Toys 

motor vehicles as loads. 
This a 



The life and bustle characteristic of real stations is easily reproduced with the aid of Dinky Toys Station 

Staff and Passengers. Every Hornby Railway requires some of these figures; 




es particu- 
to the various 




are necessary and up-to-date pieces of equipment, and can 
be usefully employed in the collection and delivery of 
parcels and for the lighter kinds of freight traffic. Several 

vehicles backed up to the road 

ive a splendidly 

scene. 

in 



Racing 



v_-ars, 





of 

Goods 

miniature 






of the 

look to a 



A recent deve 





practice has been the pro- 







* 



vision of road-rail tank trailers for the conveyance of 
liquids in bulk. These trailers are adapted for haulage on 
the road by mechanical horses, and when loaded for rail 

transport they are secur 
held on special flat trucks. 
This form of traffic can be 



reproduced very effectively 

1 - JT ^P 

on a 



l 



may be supposed to require transport in connection witl 
some racing event. Strictly speaking such loads should be 

conveyed imder cover, but 
nature they could 



o wi ng 



to their 




conveyed on Flat Trucks. 






might be covered with a Hornby 

tins shrouding would help to give something of the air of 

_ 




that surrounds record- 




cars when 



are 



Another 




ive 




is 











Toys No. 30G. The Tractor, No. 22E, also is useful, and it 

ft *j i * * * ■ 



is 




c 




m i ng 



to 





layout. The 

Dinky Toys 
No, 33 F, can be employed in 



con 



way 




on 



wi t h 











ready referred to. For rail 
transport the standard Flat 



Truck is suitabl 



( 




the 




photograph on 




page shows how two of these 






Trailers can be accommo- 

.■:om I'm rt ably on one 
Flat Truck. An assembly of 
this kind will 
ablv to the interest of 

i_JT 

m 

fast freight train. 

For other road services 

the 





arrange for it to be hoisted 



correc 





means of 




Goods Yard Crane. Heavier 














as 





i um 



Tank of the Royal Tank 
orps Set, Dinky Toys No. 





51, require special wagons 

for their conveyance, 

for this purpose the No. 2 

Trolley Wagon is ideal. The 

Tank looks most impressive 

the well 




The components of the 

Postal Set, Dinky Toys No. 



12, can be applied with good 





that are operated 

railway the Six-Wheeled Wagon, 




Road-rail transport for liquids on a Hornby railway. The Railway Mechanical Horses are 

ready to lake awav Ihe Tank Trailers loaded on Ihe Flat Truck. 



to any miniature rg 
way. An immense quantity 
of mail matter is carried by 

and the Royal 

ami 






a 



types 






vehicle 




ry effectively, 
also as a liv 
latter 





onl} 



float 



* 










ener s 



can be used 



small for the 




it can be considered as representin 







a 




An interesting 



special type of vehicle for prize ani 

addition to it when loaded would be a net to restrain any 

restiveness on the part of the load; such a net can easily be 




up of Meccano Cord. 






the 



staff 




are a familiar sight at almost every station, 
rone Call Box and the G.P.O. Pillar Boxes of the 





Postal Set can be placed on the platform of more import- 
ant stations quite correctly; a row of Telephone Boxes will 

to give a station a well-equipped and up-to-date air. 
It is frequently the practice nowadays for car parks to 
be provided at railway stations, In miniature the parking 
of several Dinky Toys Motor Cars in a space enclosed by 
Paled Fencing will add to the realistic effect of any station 

on a Hornby railway. 






• 





THE MECCANO 








Branch News 

West Had don. — The redecoration of 

room has been completed. A 
Hornby Railway layout was prepared 
a local fete. The train was worked by a 
Standard Compound, which ran exception- 
ally well. Several changes have been made 

in the staff of the L.N.E.R. section, and 

have also been made to the 
On the L.M.S. line a large junction 

is being installed at "Crewe/' where the 
"Liverpool" and "Manchester" lines 



also be used by the electric trains. A double 
triangular junction outside this station 
joins the two sections. It is hoped to 
new rolling stock into service s 








and 

diverge from the main line. It is intended 

Championship. 





to inaugurate a 

retary; D. G. Bush. 

Haddon, Nr. Rugby. 

St. Stephens (Salt ash). 

have been held, 



and 

to change from 6-volt to 20-volt 
motive power. Secretary: W. B. Hutchin- 
son, 11, Sharrow View, Sheffield 7. 

A discussion was 



layout. It took some two weeks to 
this together again, but track working is 
once more in full swing and winter time- 
tables have been drawn up 




F, E. Saunders, 79, Dover Road, Folkestone. 



Ardslev, 



ftn 



The 



Bran c h layout now 





on the 
ect of "The Variation of the Branch 
Programme/' during which the possibilities 






and 



azine were 



of a Branch 

rai-ed and debated. On the second of the 





series of Evening Tours members trav 

to Fulwell Trolleybus Depot, which is the 

largest in London, returning via Brentford 



includes a representation of the L.N.E.R. 

at Sheffield, with three platforms. 
There is a branch line to the L.M.S. 

. ■ m ■ . 

station. Electric lights have been installed 
in the L.N.E.R, sidings, and L.M.S. sidings 
are now to be built. Chairman: Mr. H. Hill, 
I, Bank Street, Stairfoot, Barnslcv, Yorks. 



ISLANDMAGEE. 







ng 



the 



Summer 




Sessions interest was taken in outdoor sports 

and recreations. A talk was given by 




meetings 




tra c k 



building has been pushed on so that 
more extensive and attractive train 

working can be carried out. Controls 

have been fitted to a number ol newly- 

while other work 

connection with 

: B. 





turnouts. 
Braund, 9, Horner Park, Saltash. 

Elmside (Exeter). 





— Attendances 
have been good at all meetings, and 
intensive train working has 
ried out. A new three-track layout has 

down, and the improved 
design of this has resulted in more 
efficient running. Younger 
have occupied evenings with Dinky 







■ 

s ope 




A visit was paid to 





Mr. A. 
Construction 



ock on 



f * 




Design and 



The Winter Sessions 



opened with a general meeting, and 

I loi tltn k':.i k '•.-,-; »v . ,j ■<-]•; 1 1 u >i -• n.TQ m t\v ffi 




swing. 




S. McCready, 



"Hillmount," Island magee, Co. 
Antrim. 




riches 



in 



Course of 



Formation 

ie following new Branches of the 
Hornby Railway Company are at 

present in process of formation, and 



Tl 






an> 




s 



w ho a re 




:ere 





desirous of linking 
unique 











with this 



COm- 



Exeter Station during holiday time, 
when the intensive traffic proved very 

interesting. The resumption of time- 
table working is under consideration 
Secretary: 






X. Fenwick, 45, Cal- 
Road, Exeter. 
Lostock Gralam. — Regular track meet- 
ings have been held, and many interesting 

trains have been run. Considerable work 



Members of the Northampton H.R.C Branch No, 284. at their recent 
Annual General Meeting, Chairman, G. L. D. Hodges; secretary, E. F. 
Dillingham* The Northampton Branch was incorporated in March 1935, and 

has since made excellent progress* Realistic track operations are the chief 
feature of the programme. Regular excursions are held in the summer, and 
members recently enjoyed a visit to Liverpool, where they were shown 

the Meccano Factory, Both indoor and outdoor games are played. 



municate with the promoters, whose 
names and addresses are given below, 

lake — Mr, R* K- Fisher, 170 f 
The Promenade, Hoy kike, Cheshire. 

Leigh-on-Sea — T. Brown, 47, Henrv 




Drive. 

Tu.N BRIDGE 




Calverley Street 



was put in during the preparation and 






printing of the Annual 




ort, copies 




which have been sent to other Branches. 
At the commencement of the Winter 
Session all equi 




was 



thoroughly 




cleaned and overhauled. The first meeting 
of the Photographic Section was 
members are making good use of photo- 
graphic articles published in the "M.M." 




rum 




and Hanwell. The club was 
in arranging a Congress of London H.R.C. 

at which five Branches were 
represented. Various subjects were dis- 
inclining inter-club visits, recruit- 









J 



track 



o 




s 




clubroom problems, and further meetings 
are to be held. Secretary: S. W. Simmons, 
7, Alfred Road, Acton, London W.3- 




Q 11 a Ti t r i 1 1 „ 



3, Timberdine 










Bournemouth — K. Gacon, 136, 

Road. 
Long Eaton — F. R. Davys, 65, Curzon 

Street, Long Eaton, Notts. 
Hounslow — D. Cook, 16, Ivanhoe Road, 

Hounslow, Middlesex. 
Liverpool — M. P. Preston, Copsham Cot- 

L 

tage, Alma Road, Liverpool 17. 
India — Mr. B, S. Kurwa, Kurwe Castle, 








A. I*. S 







Wine ham 



Hall, Korthwich. 






Waterloo (Dublin). 
made in the Branch layout, which repre- 
sents the Kent and East Sussex Railway, 
include the raising of the baseboard. This 









Walkeshwar Road, 
New Zealand — B, 




6. 

193, 




■ 

•ch- 



Road, Ycndalton, Christchurch. 




The Branch is now in- 
stalled in its new headquarters, which 
comprises two rooms, and the track has 

been laid. Additional clockwork and electric 
track has been purchased and incorporated 





down in J 925 as 
the Rother Valley Railway, and following 



line was origir 




I dloes 



LlanidIoes > 
London— 




Jones, Post 




me 






The clockwork section 






in the 

includes a terminus with three platforms 
aud goods and engine yards, and a single 
line to a passing station, which has two 
through platforms and a bav- The main 



line runs on to a small terminus, which will 




was renamed in 1934 




Regular 
out. and 






, B. M inter, 
Hall Road, Stroud Green, 




i ton 



train funning lias been 
great interest was taken in the working of 

wi t h t h e 








trams in 

sheep fair at "Tenterden." Secre- 
tary: S. B. Carse, 38, Oakley Road, 
Ranelagh, Dublin. 



Branches Recently Incorporated 

354. Stanmore— Mr. L. W. Hall, 69, 



Marsh Lane, Stanmore, Middlesex 



355. Ulverston 

With 



Mr 



H. 



S 



Pursey, 




Rakehead, Ulverston, 



Folkestone. — The shed 




serves as £i 



l^ancs. 



clubroom has been repainted, necessitating 
the dismantling of the extensive 







356- Craigavad — Mr, \V, T, Shaw, Rock- 
port School, Craigavad, Co. Down, 



* 



* 



* 



I 




MECCANO MAGAZINE 



657 






■ 















< 



** 



nnnnnnnnnnn 

D 

□ 

□ 
□ 

D 
□ 




□ 



Join the Hornby Rail- 
way Company and 

become eligible for 
the competitions an- 
nounced on this page* 




DDDnDDDDDnn 







nnDDDDD "MISSING LINKS" CONTEST DDDnaDDDnn 



J ointht Hornby Rail- 
way Company ami 
become ttigihte for 
the competitions aw 
nounced on this page. 



a 
a 

□ 

a 

□ 

□ 

a 

□ 




popularity of "Hidden Words 



a 



and 



it 



Missing 



Links" contests seems to increase with each competition 
of this kind that is announced. There is great fascination 



m 












tlii 



& 







we are 



of 




Villi? 




nnnnnnnnnnn 

and class must be stated. If a station is jointly owned the 

names of all the comoanies concerned must be given. 



Prizes consisting 



Meccano 





l Train material or 



to the value of 21/ 



1 5/ 



and 



another opportunity 
exercising their detective 




nnnnnDnnnDnnannnannnnnnnnnnannnnnnnnnnnnnnnDnn 




skill in tracking down 
missing links in a collec- 
tion of railway names. 



In the 




in 




centre of this page are 32 
mutilated names of well- 

known locomotives, sta- 

The 










ers 




have 




en 








omitted are represented by 
dashes, and H.R.C. mem- 

are set 

completing 

words. There is no catch in 
the contest, and in spite of 

each 
will be found to form part 
of a name of a locomotive, 
station or train 
be familiar to every H.R.C, 





□ 
a 

a 

a 
p 

a 

a 

n 

n 
a 
n 

a 

a 
a 

n 

a 
a 

a 

a 

n 

a 
a 

a 

n 









WHAT ARE THESE RAILWAY NAMES? 



W 
v 



KI-B 









H 



O-N 
P 



RN 



ES 



PR 



■ 



RO 

L 

T 



T 



BA 



TE 



I-H-O-R-E 



T 

L 

DER 
DWA 



R-Y 
H-L 
AST-I 



D 



R 



O-D-N 



H 



R 



TI 



O 



R 



L 



T 



C-L 

C 



B 



NA 
ING 



N 



E 
B 
LE 



• ■ 



B-S 



M 

W 

T 
P 



CA 

NT 

D 



IN 

E 



R 



E 



GH 



L-E 



EL 
TO 

E ST-E 



X 



N 



ISH 



I 



L 



Y 

NG 



TRI 
Y 




YS 

B 

S 



YNA 



C 
£A 



W 



OT 



□ 

a 

5 

a 

n 

a 
a 

n 

a 
a 

n 
n 
a 

a 

n 

a 

n 

n 
a 
n 
a 



respectively will be award- 
ed to the senders of the 









entnes containing the larg- 
est number of correct solu- 

n the case of a tie 




prize 





■ ' 



ges 



give preference to 
competitor whose 




is most 




set 



out or is presented in the 

novel manner. In 




it ion to the three main 
prizes a number of con- 




ion 




prizes 



will 



be 



Envelope 




t I 






containing 
entries must be marked 

H.R.C. November Miss- 
ing Links 

left- 





m 










comer and 





en com 





rr\ 




e discovered all the correct 

or as many of them as they can find, they should 

the order. in which 



post ed 



to 



reach 





in 




ei 




name 




appear in 

written the initials of the railway company concerned, 
and in the case of locomotives their wheel arrangement 



quarters at Meccano Ltd., Binns Road, Liverpool 13, 
on or before 30th November, The entries from overseas 

ers must reach this office not later than 28th 

ruary 1939. 

the back of each entry submitted tor this contest 






must be clearly indicated 




sender's name 








and also 




H.R.C. 




full 
number. 



% 



i 



November Word-Building Contest 



The two words "Hornby 




n $ 



t j 



are 



among the most familiar in the English 
language to H.R.C. members. How many 

words can you make up from the 




letters in them? Handsome prizes are 
offered for the best lists of standard English 
dictionary words that can be built up in this 
mariner. Any of the letters in the two words 
may be used, but no letter may appear 
more often than it does in the key words. 
Entries should be written on one side of 
the paper only and should state the total 
number of words. The sender's name, full 




postal address and H.R.C. 

number also should be given on the back 

of each sheet of paper used. 

The contest will be divided as usual into 
two sections, Home and Overseas, 




prizes of Hornby Trains or Meccano pro- 
ducts to the value of 21/-, 15/- and 10/6 
will be awarded to the three winners 
in each section. 

Envelopes containing entries must be 
marked "H.R.C. November Word-Building 

the top left-hand corner and 

each Meccano Ltd., Binns Road, 
Liverpool 13, on or before 30th November. 
The Overseas closing date is 28th February 
1939. 







July 



<< 



Mixed Names" Contest 

Solution 









Minster-on-Sea, S.R. (Eastern Section). 
"Flying Scotsman/' L.N.E.R. 4-6-2 "Al 
Glass No. 



if 





LM.S. 4-6-0 "Jubilee" 

Class No. 5GtS8. 
Princess Alexandra;' L.M.S, 4-6-2 "Prin- 



cess Coronation*' Class No. 6224. G.W.R. 
4-6-0 "Star" Class No. 4053. 



" Sir 




gramore, 



*i 



S.R. 



4-6-0 



t€ 







tt 



Arthur" Class No. 771. 

The Pytchley/' L.N.E.R. 4-4-0 "Hunt" 
(D49) Class No. 298. 

Banffshire:' L.N.E.R. 4-4-0 "Shire" 



r« 



# 



(D49) Class No. 309. 
Llangedwyn Hail/' G.W.R. 4-6-0 "Hall" 

* - _ . 



Class No. 4941. 









ress, 



if 





Chester-Bournemouth. 
Okehampton, S.R. (Western Section). 




A4" 



14 



Sir Niqei Gresley," L.N.E.R 
Class No. 4498. 

The Merseyside Express/' L.M.S. London 




Liverpool (Lime Street). 

Sir Aghvale," S.R. 4-tf-O "King Arthur 
Class No. 781. 

"The Mancunian/* L.M.S. London (Euston) 
-Manchester (London 










Liverpool Street, L.N.E.R.; Mytholmroyd, 
L.M.S.; Ambergate, L.M.S. 



The 

■ • 

ton) -J 




L.M.S. 

(London 




(Eus 



COMPETITION 




SULTS 



Scotland. Consolation Prizes: 



L. Ma k IN- 



HOME 
"August Errors Contest No. 1.*'— First: F. Mills (31). 
Kearsley, Nr. Bolton. Second: L. J. Payne (4S4S0). 
Luton, Beds. Third: J. McIn-tyre. (31781), Paisley, 

Alkstree, Derby; W. B. Hudson (1733), Weymouth; 

C. Cosgravr (53957), Grey Abbey, Co, Down; L. J, 
Slater (49<»<-I), Cosham, Portsmouth; H. J. Roberts 

(55X1(3), Birkenhead 

"August Photo Contest No. 5. "—First: D. F, 
Forbes (14092), Leith, Edinburgh 6. Second: E. 
Oldham (43390), Hyde, Cheshire, Third: G, L. Wilson 
(2478), Wormit-on-Tay, FHeshire. Consolation Prizes: 

D. J. W. B rough (824(11, Chea«, Surrey; E. F. Brad 
shaw (43645), Gidea Park, Essex; G. Marshall (51888), 
WhaJW Range, Manchester 16; J, Turlky 
Tunbridge 




K. Moss (18993), St. Helens, Lanes! 



OVERSEAS 
"May Locomotive Contest."— First: W. S. Eagle 

(31779), Bombay, India. Second: K. Pearson (29199), 
Victoria, Australia. Third: D, Mumso.v (37842), 
Buenos Aires, South America. Consolation Prize: D. 
Parker (3S595), Ontario, Canada, 

*!May Photo Contest No. 2.'*— First: G. C. Tavlor 
(592G5), New South Wales, Australia. Second; A. G. 

Fkl lows (29952), Auckland N.4, Now Zealand. Third: 
A. R. Bacon (38242), Bombay, India. Consolation 
Prices: P. Macro nald (43305), Toronto, Canada; T. 
Watson (18065), New South Wales, Australia; G. 

Pearson (53733), Victoria, Australia; K. R. Cassells 
(39510), Wellington. NVw Zealand. 



653 



THE 






V ■ 

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II 

ir 
• ♦ 

M 
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10 United States 
15 

20 

25 
30 

35 
40 

45 
50 

5 Uruguay 
10 

15 
20 

25 
30 

35 
40 
45 
50 



it 

it 

• * 

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• • • 




if 

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• #* 



* *■ 



# - 



. •• 



■ *« 



• *• 



«■ * 



(Postage \ 
Extra / 

5 Venezuela,.. 

10 

15 
20 

25 

5 Algeria 

10 

15 

5 Cameroon* 
10 

5 Gaboon 

10 

5 Indo China 
10 .. 

5 Togo 

4 Perak 
4 Selangor 
4 Negri 






• ft* 



-« r 



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II 



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... 



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■ ** 



■ »■ 



*♦ • 



2d, 

5d. 

8d. 

I/- 
1/4 
2d. 
5d. 

2d. 
5d. 
8d. 
2d. 

5d. 

2d. 

sd. 

3d. 

3d. 

3d. 
3d. 







This wonderful pneket of 35 different stamps includes a beautiful unused black Caicos Island stamp just 
issued. Fine sets of Canada, Australia (including Jubilee and K.G.). Czechoslovakia, Swiss, Italian (portrait 
of Mussolini!, unused Ukraine (TridcntJ, Azerbaijan (Mint}, old U.S.A. and Map stamp. Belgium, Hun- 
gary, India and obsolete issues. Finally, to the first 500 appli 



„. , , _ , . . . . nts we are including a large new K.G. VI 

Ueylon, an unused puke of Windsor stamp, and a magnificent set of 5 different Danzig, also illustrated 

n * Just send 2d. postage and request our famous approval sheets, 




LISBURN & TOWN SEND LTD. (Dept. MM.), LIVERPOOL 




J. RUSSELL, 



23. SHANKUN DRIVE. WESTCLIFF-ON-SEA 



ONE 



THOUSAND 



STAMPS 





WONDERFUL 1938 
20 



OFF 






NEW ISSUES AND NOVELTIES 

Including ANDORRA (new), Belgium, Canada, Denmark, FRENCH E 

T0RIAL AFRICA (pictorial), GRENADA (King George VI). GREECE (Bull 
vaulting scene), jugo Slavia, KELANTAN {Sultan Ismail), MOZAMBIQUE 
CO. (Giraffe). MOROCCO A6ENCIES (King George VI. already obsolete). 



Turkey, etc. I will send this collection absolutely free to all stamp 

ectors sending 2d. postage (abroad 4d.l. 

G. P. KEEF, WILLINGDON, EASTBOURNE, ENGLAND 




ON APPROVAL 



i/- 



From which you may select any 100 for 3/'. 

This selection is ftot made up of the very commonest 

varieties! but contains stamps catalogued at 

each or more, (I do not sell less than 100.) 

Special Offer: Packet of Mint British Colonial, cat a* 

loguc value at least £!, post free, 5/-. 
A returnable deposit of £1 is required from overseas 

applicants- 

H. HARDY. "Hoy land." Potter Helgham. Norfolk. 

100 DIFFERENT STAMPS FREE to applicants for id. 

approvals. Cox, 14, Broadmead Av,, Worcester Park, 















MMEMORATIVE 
NIAL 







ITISH 

25 different, inc. Q. Victoria, K. Edward VII, K. George V, K. Edward VIII, K. George 

Jubilee and Coronation. All Br. Cols. This worth-while and as described set 

FREE. Ask Approvals enclosing postage only. ALSO FREE EXCHANGE 








FOR YOUR DUPLICATES. 



ASTLEY 




CO 



(M3) 



* 



NEWBOLDS 



# 



Dealers supplied. 

WOLVERHAMPTON 








A really marvellous packer containing 46 fine stamps, 
beautiful pictorials from ORIENTAL COUNTRIES 0NLY- 
Temples, Mosques, Pyramids, Minarets, desert scenery, etc. 

SPANISH MOROCCO, 2 IRAQ, unused OTTOMAN EMPIRE 

(obsolete). Set or 1 TURKEY including old and new issues. 
Sets of 5 EGYPT. 4 PALESTINE, BRITISH MOROCCO (Geo. VI). 5 GEORGIA (quaint-looking stamps usually sold for 5d.}. Set of 5 ALGERIA 
(pictorials), Set of 4 FRENCH MOROCCO (large pictorials), Set of 6 TUNIS {including bi-colourcd Parcel Post). The last three sett alone 

would sell singly for 1/2 — and 2 beautiful SYRIA. This is the finest packet for the money I have ever offered, 
Price 4id. only. Postajre lid. (abroad 3d. extra). Purchasers of the above asking to see my approval sheets will be 
presented with 10 PERSIA. In addition to this senders of addresses of stamp-collecting friends will receive set 

of 6 POLAND. BARGAINS: 20 Airpost, 6d., 100 B, Colonials, 1/-. o Triangulars, 7d., 20 Brazil, 6d. w A r ^ _ 




C WATKINS (M 




GRANVILLE ROAD 



# 



BARNET 




THE FIRST STAMP Ever Issued 

(British 1840 Penny Black] for P.O. 3/6. It is guaran* 
teed genuine in every respect. Its companion scamp 
(1840, 2d. blue) for a further 5/9 (cat. 17/61! Other 
'•Classics*' which every Collector should have arc the 

Cape of Good Rope Triangulars; we offer Id* rose (cat* 

40/-] for 12f6: U. blue teat. 15M for Si-; and 6d. pale 
lilac {cat. 40/-) at 15/-. Superb approvals of any 
country against approved English References or a 

deposit* Full Lists Free. 

N0RRIS & CO. (Dept. ML Norwood. London S.E.I 9. 

■ 











16 FOREIGN and 
14 COLONIALS 

THESE TWO WONDERFUL PACKETS, VALUED AT OVER 2/6. FREE co every genuine applicant enclosing 2d. postage 
(abroad 6d.) for my world-famous "VALUE" approvals, containing only perfect stamps at very low prices which 

enable you to buy TWO stamps instead of one. Just look at too Gluteals: 

SJUBILEEand CORONATION issues, scarce usedpictorial higfa valoes from ALGERIA. MOROCCO. TUNIS, LUXEMBOURG. 
beautiful NEW ISSUES trom ITALIAN EAST AFRICA (first stamp ever issued), AUSTRALIA. GREECE. MONACO. 

PICTORIAL INDIAN STATES, large ITALIAN C0MMEMS.. rare used American high value, stamps from out-of-che 

lit t 3 

way Hyderabad, 







tea, Gwalior, Travincore, finally, a superb set of 6 Bay King Peter. 
You remember my faiaoas New Year's aHer, this is even better. 

PHILIP COCKRILL, 13, MONTRELL ROAD, STREATHAM HILL, LONDON S.W.2 



5 Charkhari 



5 Cyprus 
10 Danzig 
10 Dutch Indies 5 Ecuador 

5 Esthonia 10 F, M. S, 



5 Costa Rica 5 Cuba 

25 Czechoslovakia 5 Dahomey 
ly Denmark 5 Dominican R 



10 Egypt 

25 Finland 



25 France 
5 Fr. Guinea 
5 Gaboon 



- 5 Fr. Congo 

5 Fr. India 

5 Georgia 



5 Ft, Guiana 
5 Fr. Soudan 

50 Germany 



Any ONE of the above packets yours ABSOLUTELY 
FREE by requesting approvals and sending 2d. stamps 
(abroad 6d») Without approvals 6d* per packet. 



(Dept 



6dJ 

WINDSOR STAMP CO. 
M], 59, LEE ROAD, BLACKHEATH, Si.3. 



•m 



15 CZECHOSLOVAKIA STAMPS 



PACKET 



OF 



AND 



STAMP 



MOUNTS 






FREE to all approval sheet applicants sending 2d, 
postage and requesting a copy of our latest list of sets 
and packets. This offer is for 30 days only, abroad 

60 days. 



WRITE KOW to; ERRIMGTON & MARTIN, 

Dept. 287. South Hackney, London E.9. Est. 1880. 



FREE PACKET oi all ditT. South 

approval applicants sending Zch 

36, Wye i iff e Road, Coventry. 



American stamps to 
postage. Kimbcrley. 



— 





110 DIFFERENT 

STAMPS 

To introduce my excellent approval selections of 
British Colonials. I am presenting free of charge this 
uality packet of stamps, including pictorials from 
ritish Guiana t Jamaica, Canada, Malta f Australia, 
New Zealand, Kenya, Ceylon, Tasmania, etc, and 

■• * "ft 1 

many other stamps too numerous to mention, to all 

genuine approval applicants (pose free). 

Eric J. Watts, 184. Northampton Road, Wellingborough. 





SPECIAL 

8 Colonial JUBILEES to alt genuine approva 
applicants enclosin.fi 2d, for postage, and stat- 
ing their interests, add wheiher beginner or 
medium coll&ctors — every 20th applicant will receive a 
COMPUTE set of CANADA JUBILEE. The most interesting 
BRITISH COLONIAL APPROVALS-eonutHng mini and used 
jubilees. Coronations (sets end singles). New fssues— full of 

BARGAINS 
SPECIAL— F ALKUNDS or NEWFOUNDLAND JUBILEE comp, # 

Mint 3'% 

T.R. Hughes \PJS.} § *lbis Cottage/ Amersbam, Bucks. 






FREE SET and 50 different to approval applicants. 

Goslingj 21. Powling Road, Ipswich, 







ANY COLONY 




convents a 



MANY RARE STAMPS have been found by purchasers 
of The "DIAMOND" Packet which contains npprox. 
1.000 UN SORTED STAMPS from 

1 pkt. 1/6. 3 pkts. 319. 5 pkts. 6/-. All cost free inland. 

{Postage to Colonies 3d. per pkt. extra. S. Africa and 
Foreign 6d. per pkt. extra. Places on Empire Airmail 




Route l/» per pkt. extra.) Beware of imitations. 



O. NERUSH 



(DEPT. "A"). 68. TURNPIKE LANE, LONDON N.8. 












■ 

A short set of George VI In test pictorials of your 
favourite Colony will be sent tree of charge to all 

genuine approval applicants. Choose your own Colony! 
A set of Indian George VI will be also enclosed as a 

further gift, Send 2d. for postage, etc., and write 

NOW to: 

G. RINGSMILL (.DcdL M.M.). NEW BARNET. HERTS. 



My approvals are guaranteed to please 
because you get such amazing bargains. 
British Colonies and Foreign Countries 
from Id. to £1 each and over. Say what 

you want. 

Campbell, Haldon Avenue, Teignmouth. 



will 



FIRST 25 APPLICANTS for approvals win receive 
Mint Federated Malay States lc.. 1925 issue. Good 
discount. Calthorpc, Cuttings Av„ Sutton-in-Afchfield. 






Fine packet of unused African stamps from Belgian Congo (river scene), Morocco Agencies King Geo. 
VI t already obsolete. Italian East Africa (Abyssinia, etc.). Sudan, Somali Coast, Kenya, Carneroons f a 
fine sec of 5 Ivory Coast, new i«uc, inscribed in error *Balotic Woman* for 'Baoute Woman' — one is 
already obsolete — and another set, only just issued, of French Guinea* Mozambique, ctc M etc, 30 stamps 
in all. sent free to all genuine applicants for approvals enclosing 2d, postage. Only one gift to each 

applicant* 





HARRISON 



ROYDON 



WARE 




For other stamp advertisements see pages 660 and xxviii 



* 



> 




MECCANO MAGAZINE 



659 




RAILWAY DEVELOPMENT IN STAMPS 






PROBABLY most of our readers are familiar with the story of the 



1 development of 

sought to tell the s 






We wonder how many of them have 
with the aid of postage stamps. Few stamp 

series are so complete, yet so 
simple to compile. There are 
only slightly more than 130 
stamps in the complete series, 
but these cover effectively- the 
whole story from Stephenson's 
days to modern streamlined 

giants. 



the 3c. value of Uruguay's 1895 issue. This was of exaetiv the same 
type as the famous G.N.R. locomotives that hauled 



J" J 
he 



Scotsman" 50 years 



Other 




endid 





in the August 



it ' t ■ t 

"M.M," 




Stephenson's 




un- 



fortunately is not to be found 
in the collection, but it has 

the 



in 



excellent deputies 

"Austria" shown on the 12 gr. 
value of Austria's railway centenary commemorative issue of 1937, 
~~ J " K ~ "**--*-*• built in 1835 for the Bavarian Railways, illustrated 



and the 



Ea $ te 



on the 60 pf. value of Germany's railway centenarv issue of 1935 
The first of these stamps is illustrated here. Both 



railway stamps are a "wood- 
burner," similar in type to 

the New Brunswick stamp 

already described, seen on 
the U.S. 3c. issue of 1869, 
and the "mail train" design 
on the 5c. value of the U.S. 
1912 parcels post issue. The 
latter shows a mail train 

at full 

■ . 

out to pick up a sack of 

mail at a wayside station. 

This picture is so splendid an impression of a locomotive at speed 






. . * 






locomotives actually were 
Robert Stephenson and 

m m 




England bv 



The other stamps in these Austrian and German 
series showed modern =*«**••*» >*~* iit*.j~:- i — 



electric loco- 
e the famous 

streamlined 
articulated Diesel engined xailcar unit, which at 
the time of issue of the stamp was the fastest 



motives, the most 

Fly i ng 



Hamburger 







covering 



the 



run between 






and Hamburg at an average 




of 







77.4 m. p.h. This train is shown on the 25 pf, of the 
German series. The 25 gr. Austrian stamp showing 

J steam locomotive is illustrated on this page 

"" one of ^-- T>t ~* -*•■•- - 
motives, was shown on 

post issue, one of which, the 3 fr., is illustrated on 
this page. This engine was slight h later in type 
than "Austria" and " Eagle." Another design in 
this series showed a Diesel railcar unit. 




that it is a pity the wheel-arrangement is not clearly defined. The 

leading wheels are apparently the same size as the drivers, and as the 

connecting rod is partial.lv obscured, we are left in 
doubt as to whether the arrangement is 4—4-2 
2-6-2. The 3c. value in the same series showed a 

sorting clerk at the door of a mail van, plac- 
ing a sack of mail in readiness for delivery into a 



or 





lineside collecting apparatus. 

The 2c. value from the U.S. 1901 series showed 
a splendid picture of an express train of Pullman 



cars being hauled bv one of the then up-to-date 




2 "Atlantic" type passenger express engines. 
Newfoundland's 5c. 1928 tourist publicity issue 

jr J 






ian State Railway's earliest loco- 
; higher values of the Belgian 1935 parcel 



showed a picture of a 4-6-2 "Pacific 

ing the cross-country 



1 1 






The earli 



iest mil way stamp design appeared on a 
issued in 1860 by New Brunswick. The 



lc. stamp 

locomotive shown on this stamp was a wood- 
burning engine with a 4-4-0 wheel arrangement. 
Its outstanding features were a tremendous spark- 

k A m . * . m mm • * 



arrester fitted to the chimney, a necessary item of 



equipment since the railway ran through virgin 
forests, and a high railing along the running 
plate, presumably to enable the driver to take a 



around lus engine without risk of falling off. 




Johns to Port-aux-Basques. 

A typical C.P.K. locomotive is shown on Canada's 1927 20c, 
Special Delivery stamp but the illustration is a composite picture 

Showin" tin' development O.f mail deliverv servic.^ 

within the Dominion, and the locomotive is too 

a feature to be considered a first-class 



s m ; 







railwav picture. 

Among South American stamps the best rail way 



specimen is to be found on the lc. value of 

A ... 



Ecuador's 1908 issue celebrating the 25th anni- 
versary of the opening of the Guayaquil-Quito 

Railway. This is a really splendid locomotive 



if 



portrait 



it 



and 





a 4—4-0 engine equi 





value of Egypt's 1933 International Railway Congress 
1 " an excellent illustration of the next stage of the 
development of locomotive design, marked by the introduction of 






issue 



a pilot or "cowcatcher," a headlight in 

front of the chimney and a bell. 

Salvador showed an early type of 4-4-0 engine 
on a 3c. stamp issued in 




featured a still earlier type, com 



while Honduras 



arrester and headlight in 
There are 




with cowcatcher 



■ 



its 1898 series. 




no 





e 





ing wheels and 



inders, coupled driv- 

a Cab for the 




stamps illustrating 



home railways but 




en gme 



locomotive crew. The 
shown on it is typical of those 
serving the Egyptian Railways 
; ~ 1852, and three other 



la provides an ex 
view of an 

train on the 4" a. value of its 
current Issue, and South-West 








Africa shows a mail train in 



m 

excellent designs in 




en 



of the 





same 



series 




w engines o 



4 





encan 



1862 and 1932. 
Stamps of the 

continent are rich in railway 
designs, one of the most out- 



standing 



of 



winch shows a 



Stirling "single -wheeler' 



on 



the 

lid. value. 

There is not sufficient space 
here to deal with all of the 
stamps available, electric loco- 
motives for example, but 
Editor is compiling a complete 
list, and will send a copy 
reader who cares to apply. 







660 



THE MECCANO 








To 




e 




TO-DATE in 




Co I lectins 



UNUSED 




/ 









1864 





i ave one 





xe 



NEW 





GIBBONS 




and 6d. U.P.T. Co.. CANADA JUBILEE, 10 NEWFOUNDLAND (cac, 2/1). 
Queen Mary, George V, S« W, Arm Trinity, Publicity issue Newfoundland and 
Labrador, S.S. Caribou Codfish, 3 NIGERIA 1921/32, the lot 6d. post free. 







"BIG" GIBBONS 1939 

Best and most detailed catalogue, essential to 
every keen collector. Brand-new feature 
"Simplification Tables" — makes it easy for all 

collectors to use. 1,924 pages, 22,105 price 
alterations, 2,367 new issues added. 




UNION 
SOUTH 

AFRICA 



FACE 





Sale 
Price 




ASK FOR CATALOGUE OF CLEARANCE SALE LOTS 







the World in one Volume 



:16s 



♦ 



extra, U.K. 6d„ abroad 



In separate parts: 

BRITISH EMPIRE, Egypt and Iraq 



FOREIGN COUNTRIES 



Post extra, U.K. 6d., abroad lOd, 



of collection— over 30,000 varieties offered by Countries. 290 U.S.A., cat. £40 
for 50/-; 247 Spain, cat. £25 for 25/-; 230 Spanish Colonies and Dependences. 
car. £15 for 20/-; 253 Italy and States, cat. £30 for 30/.; 13? Nicaragua, cat, 50/- 
for 5h* Any lot on approval and single stamps may be purchased if whole is 

not wanted. Hundred* of other lots* 






... 1 
abroad 







GIBBONS 



f 



SIMPLIFIED CATALOGUE 



The world's most won 







and most po 




ar 



five-shilling catalogue. Lists all the world's 
stamps (59,033) in simplest form, including 
the many fine King George VI new issues. No 

less than 7,816 stamp illustrations. Published 
late, and therefore the most up-to-date 
catalogue. 

Price 

Post- extra, U.K. 6d„ abroad 1/2 

SPECIAL. The popular CORONATION STAMPS in booklets 




5s 



♦ 




NELSON T. HILLIER, "Stamp Club/' Horsmonden, Kent 










6 CZECHOSLOVAKIA (Complete set of Independence and Le# 



ion 



Caromems.) 



3 D 




("The Ugly Duckling," "The Little Mermaid" and Hans Andersen). 



6 U.S.A. (Army and Navy Heroes' Com memo wtives). 

3 BOSNIA (Complete set of Sarajevo Assassination Comments.) 

6 INDIA i Overprinted Service, official stamps of King George V). 

These sets will be sent FREE to those who ask for approvals and enclose lid. 

postage (overseas or without approvals I/- P.O.) 

HELY HUTCHINSON <M2>. Burrock Wood, Kents Bank. Grange-owcr-Sands. Lanes. 



ON APPROVAL. Ask to see them. 





S.15, 391 




♦ 



W.C.2 



THE GIFT OF THE SEASON 




10 King George VI, no common 
ree to all applicants for 



25 difif. 1938 and recent issues includin 

Europeans but all good stamps, given free to all applicants for approvals 

who enclose 2d. for postage and ask for particulars of my free gift and 
bonus schemes. Abroad 6d. P.O. These tjift stamps would cost you about 2/- 
if purchased separately. 0. A. MASTERS, PROADSTONE. 00RSET. 











4 ICELAND, 4 rare MANCHUKUO. 4 MOROCCO (large views). 5 
MOZAMBIQUE Pictorials and 6 TUNIS, These 23 attractive stamps 
free to collectors who ask to see our bargain approval sheets. Send lid. 

for postage (abroad 9cU 

J. STOCKTON & CO., 

53, BRIDGWATER DRIVE, WESTCLIFF-ON-SEA. 



FR 








YOUR 




K 



•vcr before m the history of the Stamp Trade has anv firm offered this fine 
collection of 200 foreign stamps, including Pictorial British Colonials from S. 
Leone* Kenya, Jamaica, with Jubilees, Coronations* German Commemorative*. 
fine set of India and New*Zealarid Pictorials, and many other pretty stamp** 
Send no money — just send a postcard ,md request approvals. Let us also send this 
parcel of stamps to your pals if they rcqusre approvals*. Speak to them about ir, 
and get them to write their nnme* and addresses on your card. Those getting 

THREE pals' nnracs will get nn extra packet of Coronations free, 

PRICE & CO., Stamp Merchants, Dept. M.M., LITTLE SUTTON, CHESHIRE, 



10 Stamps Free and obsolete Australian l/6/*Hermc5 a 

to approval applicants. Postage. Walker. "Plaisancc/* 
Hildcnborough, 



IRAN MINIATURE SHEET or 7 Hunpry M, Stephen 
2td. Approval applicants. 50 Soviet Russia 

♦ I2a t The Grove* Addlestone, Surrey* 




t/ 





NUIN 




BARGAIN 







75 Different Foreign and Colonial Stamps, select 
from Collections presented to Hospital* Send 6d. 

and addressed envelope [unstamped) to: 

S EGRETARY 

Memorial Hospital Hall, Woolwich. LONDON S.E.I 8. 




! 23 PICTORIALS 

The complete set, in superb mint condition of Hun- 
gary's 1918 Bolshevist issue to all applicants tor my 

All Pictorial & Commemorative approvals from id. each. 
COURT, 924, Walsall Rd.. Great Barr. Birmingham 22. 



PHOTOGRAVURE PACKET FREE! 

free to applicants for 
J. R. Wilkinson, 




25 superb 

cheap approvals 

141 r Come ry Bank Road, Edinburgh. 



V- 



200 



STAMPS 






FREE 







STAM 

(H. B. Stride) 
60, PARK STREET. BRISTOL 



HOP 



FREE! EXHIBITION PACKET containing 50 differ* 
em stamps, including ANTWERP 1894 ml BRUSSELS 
1896 EXHIBITIONS, etc*. 250 mourns, duplicate hook, 
and perforation gauge. Request approvals. Enclose 2d. 

postage. No approvals sent abroad* A. R. Dickie 
(Dept:, Ml, 23, Wmscorabe Crescent, Ealing, W.5. 



I 



to all applicants for our approval sheets send- 
ing 2d. in stamps for posing©* etc. Ask for 
details of our special free stamp scheme for 

the coming winter* 

BONSOR c/o EDWARDS, 

20, CHARLOTTE TERRACE. LONDON H.I. 



«- • 



* ** 



*#a 






N, Zealand "Chamber of CommtTce/'comp, set.. 

Zanzibar Jubilee, complete set 

Belgium. 6 cliff- Trains for ,„ 

Queen Astrid* used $vt of 8 for 
3 Royal Children Mint for 

France. "King's visit to Paris," M. or U. „. 

Canada, 20 different used for 



i 



**• 



■ v* 



■ ■ i 



+ fcf 



**■ 




3/- 
19 
Bd. 

2/6 

3/- 

4d. 

3d. 




STAMPS 









c. extra. For appros, please send refs.orcash deposit 





(i. Post Free. "Worth While" Mint. 6d. Post Free. 

CORONATIONS 

Turks Isles, Cayman Isles. Falkland isles, Nyasaland, etc. 

Coronation Stamps are now obsolete, but I will send 
9 of these fine stamps for 6d* post free to all appli* 

cants for my "Worth While" approval sheets* 
I want YOU to see these sheets, MY pnccs t condition, 
variety and display of the stamps will do the rest. 
They have pleased hundreds of collectors and they 

%vill please you. 

JOS. H. GAZE, 21. Atwood Road. Didsfcury, Manchester. 







LL 




for approval sheets enclosing 2d. for postage (abroad 
6d.» will receive this FREE PACKET containing Kenya 

[pictorial), Canada (set), Schlcswig (plebiscite), New 
Zealand (fantailj, Ininf [native), Queensland (Queen 
Victoria), Tchad (obsolete), Italy 'parcel post], Australia 

(new), and others. New approval sheets ready, 
Good discount. Exchange desired with all Colonies 

and Dominions, 
F* 6, RDWE. 69, EDGEHILL ROAD, BOURNEMOUTH* 



KNOCK! KNOCK! 

Who's there 7 Opportunity, if you care lo lake advantage of it by 
affowinoustoinlfocfucea SPECIAL FREE GIFT forthoseof you 
who wish to dispose of duplicates- A neat pocket-size duplicate 
book, PRINTED WITH YOUR NAME, containing 5 strip pockeis 
enabling yeu lo arrange a picturesque display of a largo number of 
stamps; a Perforation Gauge; and an interleaving sheet to keep 
the stamps clean, also 25 difl. stamps and 50 mourns. The above can 
be yours just by sending 2d. and requesting us to forward you a 

selection of stamps on -appro/at. The Standard and Universal 
Stamp CoJNMltL 16. Gloucester Circus. Greenwich, S.E.10 



to Introduce 



100 all different, 2 Indian Silver Jubilees and 

1 Mozambique Triangular Air Mail 

my low-priced approval books 

containing stamps front id* Liberal discount 

given, and a list of 133 further bonus gifts of 
Coronations, Jubilees, Commemorative^* Please 

send 2d. for postage* 



C. A. RUSK. 38. 




s Av.. Whetstone. N.2Q. 






GR 




AT 



BRITAIN 



CHEAPER THAN SHOP OR APPROVALS 

250 guaranteed unsorted (off paper) incfudes Foreign, British 
Colonials, New Issues, Coronations. Air Mails, etc. Opportunity 

for "finds," 1/4L 

1 1 id. 

6d. 
7W. 



100 diff. British Colonials (includes New Issues} „. 
Set 4 Spanish Morocco (1937 M) Pictorials 



Set 4 Mozambique Triangles (1935 M) Pictorials 

Set 5 Abyssinia Red Cross (M] 84d. 

Postage free (abroad extra). Postal orders only accepted. 

Satisfaction guaranteed or money returned, 

A. JENKINS, B3, DUKE'S DRIVE. CHESTERFIELD. 



Postally used 2 ; 6 and 5'- King George 

V f cat, 2 / 7, sent free to all genuine 

applicants for approvals enclosing 2d. 
postage. Only one gift to each applicant. 

Mention "Meccano Magazine*/' 

R. D. HAR RISON, Roydon, Ware 

GREAT 

GEORGE Vi issue* 

Ceylon. Australia, Canada, etc. Coronation stamps 

many Colonies, Belgium Congo* Parks issue,, 
COSTA RICA NATIONAL EXHIBITION, Hungary 
St. Stephen. ITALIAN EAST AFRICA, FINE PIC* 

TORIAL. Belgium mourning stamp and train stamp 

with many other interesting stamps. Entirely 

and POST FREE ro applicants fior mv bargain 

approvals. MISS I. WILKINS. 

17, EAST STREET, OSNEY, OXFORD. 




GIFT OFFER 

CAYMAN ISLANDS. FIJI. 





For other stamp advertisements see pages 658 and xxviii 



• 



* 



-> 







MECCANO MAGAZINE 



661 



* 



t 



e 




; . * .^ • -^. ■ ; 

nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnDD 




Notes on 




Issues 







nnnnnnnnnnnnDnnnn 






New Colonial Issues 

Among this month's Colonial new reign 
issues the low values of the St. Kitts-Nevis 
issue, Ad.. Id., Ud. and 2kl. values, are of 
special interest, for they are among the few 
new colonial issues that employ a simple 

design. Other values from this 
Colony vary from the previous pictorial 

designs 

on ly in the 

substitu- 
tion of the 

portrait of 
K i n g 
George VI. 
We il- 
lustrate 



gigantic jewel perched on its head,, that 






i 



is reputed to dwell in its depths. 



Layon River, 




on 




ld. ( 3d 





and 5/- values, is one of the island's two 
rivers, while the principal industry, culti- 

vation of lime fruit, is represented by the 

cl. and 2 id. values, which show a scene 
during the picking of the limes. 

Pictures on 

The Roumanian series commemorating 

the centenary of the birth of 
Gnsrorescu, the famous Roumanian painter, 

most 










in 



the 




hand 




the 6d. 

value, 

w h i c h 
shows the 
King's 

and a 




picture of Cliristopher Columbus standing 
on the deck of the "«■—'- *•?-*»&*»» ~~ *u~ 



Santa 



on 




right. This picture is taken from the 
Badge of the Colony. It is a mistake to 
represent Columbus loo kin 



stamp collectors with a 

interesting set of art stamps, There are five 

stamps in the series, of which one, the 10L 
value, illustrated here, is devoted to a 
reproduction of a self-portrait of the 
painter and the remainder to reproductions 
of the artist's most famous works. These 

"The Spring"; 

ing Prisoners"; 4L., "Returning 
from Market"; 6L., "Robica, the 

Carrier* ' ' 



are as follows: 1L., 




2L. 




ing through a 
telescope, for that instrument had not been 
invented in his time, but the error goes back 
long before the days of 

stamps to the time when 



Indo-China^Railway Commemoratives 

The opening of the Trans-Indo-China 
railway has been celebrated in French Indo- 
China by the issue of a short series of three 

stamps, bearing the design illustrated on 

page 659. This shows a railway locomotive, 





the 




St. 



Colony's badge 
designed . 
Lucia's 



was 



new issue 




also devotes the whole of 
its low values, -|d. to 
values, to a King's Head 
design, but in this case, as 

the illustration of the |d. 

stamp at the head of the 

page shows, the portrait 

is small and surrounded bv 

a border of roses and flcur-de-lys. 




of Indo-Chinese 
Ives and a portrait 
of President Doumer. 




A 65c. air mail 

■ 

was issued simultaneously 








the 



same 



design 



except for the substitution 



of the ins 




ion 



* i 




Aerlenne" in the top kit 

pa n e 1 « 

- 

A Lithuanian Sports Issue 

One of the most extra- 



from the Colony's 




chain. 




linked 





exam 



of 
serve a variety 






designs as follows 



values are pictorials with 

(hL, Columbus Square; 



recently been 
Lithuania. 



a 



purposes 




prov 




in 





1/-, Government House; 2/-, the "Pitons," 
a group of mountainous rocks on the 

coast; 5/- t illustrated here, a 

of 
bananas; 10/ 






scene showing the loading 

, the Badge of the Colony. 

The Dominican series provides four 

very charming designs. 



entirely new and 
The 2d. and 




values show the famous 
Boiling Lake, reputed to have been dis- 
covered by its smell! It was the heavy 
sulphurous fumes of the volcanic gas given 

off by the lake that led its discoverer. Dr. 
Nicholls, to explore the locality and to find 

el. The 



the lake 2,000 ft. 






temperature of the water is only a little 
below boiling point and the upward 

pressure of the volcanic gases sometimes is 
so great as to force the level of the lake 
several feet upward. 

Freshwater Lake, shown on the id., 6d, 
and 2/6 values, lies in the midst of beautiful 
scenery but its only other claim to fame is a 
legendary monster, a huge serpent with a 



a series 
four stamps has been issued at 
a premium in aid of tin- 
Nat tonal Olympiad Fund. 

The same series has 
overprinted with the trefoil 

Guides 

Association and twx> different 

sets of wording meaning re- 
spectively "Guides' 

and "'Scouts' National 

the 



bad ge of t he 






the premium on 




sale of the overprinted stamps 

being devoted to 

funds of the 
tions. 




•in 



camp 



or ga n i s a - 







illustrate the 5c. -f5c. 
which shows an archer. 




ian Platypus Design 
9d. stamp issued by A 



September shows that strange creature, the 
platypus, and should prove a popular addi- 
tion to the range of zoological designs. The 

atypus has the 

distinction of be- 







ing amphibious 
fur- bearing and 
du 




S 





ys 

garded by 



and 
;s eggs! 
wonder 

al- 
re«= 



ist^ 
S 



freal 



platyp 



■ ■ 

c e the 

is makes 

its home in the 
bank 

stream 
wit h 
trances, one 





bo\ 



oth 




w 




face of 



appropriate 




tl- 



ie 




at 



it was 



Departm 



picture the animal abo 



ream. The stamp is shown in the h 



& 






page 



ew Australian designs are a Jd 




portraying 



a. 




aroo, 



1 a 




bearing the portrait ot King George 



Celebrating the Penny Black Centenary 

The provisional arrangeme 

of the 
adhesive stamps, the Penny 






for the 
of the first 

and 




Twopenny Blue stamps issued in Great 

Britain on 6th Mav 1840, have now been 
completed, and the Royal Philatelic Society, 
which has the arrangements in hand, 
announce that a Centenary Exhibition will 

be held during the week commencing 6th 



May 




at the Earls Court Exhibition 



Building in 



London 




It is intended that the 




hibition 




provide a repre- 



sentative display of the post- 



age 




of 




world to 



. 



show the development of the 
use of postage stamps. Two 
articularly interesting ex- 
hibits will be a group entitled 




M 



tr 





each 



Pioneers of Philately, 
ing the first stamp 
Stamp-issuing country through- 
out the world, and a demon- 
stration of the development of 
the design of the postage 
stamp, illustrating methods of 

intended 




action 



and 



The remaining designs are: 15+5C, javelin 
thrower; 30o-H0c., diver; 60c. + 15c M relay 

runner breaking the tape. They form a 

very attractive series. 

We thank Stanley Giibotts Ltd. for their courUty in 
loaning the stamps from which the illustrations for our 
stamp pages have ban made. 

1 H^B- JK * ■■■■■ - . D ■ H ■ 



! 






primarily to interest non-phila 
telists and beginners, 
self-contained sections w 
with aero philately and postal history, while 
the Junior Philatelic Society will undertake 

of a section for junior 




We will give further details of this 
important Exhibition at a later date. 






662 



THE MECCANO MAGAZINE 






Billiards in the Home 

Home billiards is a pastime that offers a solution to 
the ever-recurring problem of indoor recreation during 
the winter. Every member of the family finds in* it a 
fascinating diversion that never palls* The game owes a 
great deal of its amazing popularity to the firm of E, J T 
Riley Ltd*, Accrington, who have long specialised in the 
production of first-class billiard tables suitable for small 
arid medium sized houses. They particularly claim that 
their "Home" Billiard Tables are definitely not toys, 
but that each, whatever its size, is a perfect replica in 
construction of the lull-size billiard tabk. 

There are five different models of the Riley "Home" 
Billiard Table, varying in price and sise f and each one is 
available for cash or easy terms. The firm were among 
the pioneers of combined billiard and dining tables, and 
their present range of "Combines" are wonderful 
examples of utility and beauty. These products can lx> 
transformed in two minutes from a luxurious dining 
table to a flawless billiard tabic, or vice versa. Kiley 
"Combines" are made in various attractive designs ami 
sizes ranging in price from £22/10/- upward, and 
other Riley models include the "Club 1 ' and "IJAtitute" 
Models and, finally, the well-known Riley full size 
tables, Rileys are the largest makers of full-size billiard 
tables in Great Britain, and in addition, they specialise 
in the supply of accessories, repairs, re-covering 
tables, and similar work. 

A complete illustrated Art List of Riley Billiard 
Tables will be sent to anv "jlf.il/." reader who writes 
to E. J. Riley Ltd., Deal Works, Accrington , or Dept. 3, 
147, Ahiersgate Street, London E.CL 



Cycle Lighting Equipment 

The boy who is keen on night riding necessarily 
must keep his lighting equipment in a state of complete 
efficiency if he is to cover the miles with confidence and 
pleasure. This involves keeping up to data, and lor that 
reason every one of our cyclist readers should secure a 
copy of Bluemcl's 1938/9 season's catalogue of cycle 
dynamo sets ami batterv lamps, winch provides details 
of a wide range of first-lass equipment at " 
to suit all pockets. 






catalogue also displays a range of handy pocket 
torches— an inexpensive item of equipment that every 

night rider should carry for emergency use- 

Bluemel Bros, Ltd., Wolston, Nr. Coventry, will send 
a copy of this catalogue free to any reader who would 
like one. The "ALAL" should be mentioned when 



a 




«»B 



■- 




"-: 



Heroes of 





H 



c re arc 



life boatmen 





telling you of their most exciting 

Round the British coast 
travelled Gerda Shairer and Eeon 

ii. .-■■ 

Jameson, persuading shy heroes to 
talk. You'll meet Henry Blogg, of 

Cromer, who does not know how 
many people he has saved; Richard 
Stephens, of the Lizard boat, who 
always wears a green hat; Mrs. 
Amelia Johnson, heroine of Gorle- 
ston; and many others. (7/6 net,) 



1 

Heroes of 





You've ail heard of Livingstone 

and Stanley. But do you know of 
other explorers of the ioth century 
such as Oswell, the big-game 

hunter; Lord Milton, who nearly 
starved to death in the Rockies; 
Joshua Slocum, who sailed round 
the world in a tiny boat; and 
Guinnard, who was captured and 

bv Patagonia ns? In this 

book T. C. Bridies tells of these 




m 



icr intrepid men. (7/6 //<?/.) 



HARRAP 





ST. DUNSTAN'S VISITORS TO MECCANO FACTORY 




,»■ 



From left to right: Mr. W, A. Wiggins, Mr. C. Hoime, Mr. G. Fallowficld, Mr. C. J. Wheeler, Mrs. Holme, and Mr. T. J. 

Edwards of Meccano Ltd., who conducted the visitors round the factory. 



Recently we had the interesting experi- 



I 



G. 



en co of receiving at our 

Fallow field and Mr. G, J. Wheeler, two 

blind and deaf St, Dunstan's trained 
ex-Service men. Mr. Fallowiield has been an 





ic 




m 





er for 
many years, anti tor a long time had 
cherished a desire to "see" for himself how 
Meccano and Hornby Trains are made. 

With Mr. W. A. Wiggins, their escort, our 



his fingers as they passed lightly over 

objects that were handed to him, and over 
the outlines of machines that were stopped 
momentarily to permit him to examine 

them, and his lively commentary left no 

doubt of his understanding of all that 
was going on around him. Conveyor oper- 

inate him most of all. 



ations seemed to 










visitors were spending a holiday at Hoy lake 
at the Deaf-Blind Hostel maintained 

Mr. and Mrs. G. Holme, 

accompanied them on 
as interpreters. 





very Id 

visit to act 




It was particularly interesting to watch 
Mr. Fallowheld running his hands over the 

«i*v/ "Ark Royal*' model, which re- 
vealed to him for the first time the c 

■ 

features of the design of aircraft carriers. A 

letter that he has since sent to the Editor of 

"MM." 







he had been inside the 

many minutes Mr, Fallowfield had demon- 
strated that it is indeed possible for blind 

to "see." It was amazing to follow 



reveals most vividly how 

quickly he and his friend Mr. Wheeler were 



able to unders 




the 




factory and the make-up 

they were shown. 




of the 

models 









The Aircraft Dashboard 



has flown, showing how neat each of them 






{Continued from page 607) 

where it is desired to ensure that a turn is 
correctly banked. In the fore-and-aft level, 
gravitational error is a disadvantage; an 
increase in speed of the aircraft, as bv 




opening the throttle, will cause 
the liquid temporarily to run back into the 
vertical tube, and show an increase in the 
angle of flight, though no such change has 
in reality taken place. Similarly, flattening 



out after a slide will result in the liquid in 



the vertical tube running forward, making 
the angle of glide appear to be steeper 



than' it really is. These small disadvantages 





serious where 




are 



is to a minor or complete overhaul. 

It is essential of course that the time of 

flight dial should be set to zero at the 

not 




done, 



ning of every flight; if this 



is 






will not be accurately 



recorded. This disadvantage has been over- 
come by an instrument that is styled an 

sums up the total time the 

ve been in flight 




aero 



since 




a 



icir 



ind 



r_- , 




engine 
last overhaul 



taking off in mist or darkness; and liquid 
levels, either fore-and-aft or of the cross 




type, are being replaced in military 
aeroplanes and civilian air liners by gyro- 
scopic instruments. 

Most aircraft dashboards, like those of 

motor cars, are fitted with a clock; aircraft 

arranged with an ad- 
hands that will indicate 



cloc ks are 

d itional 




without the 
necessity for ground staff resetting dials at 
the beginning of ever flight. It consists of 

a dial on which the time of llight is shown 
in minutes round the outside, and in hours 

in a window immediately below the zero; 

in order that the time of flight should be 







accu 



be retu rned 






■ 








before 




leaves the ground. Even if this is not done, 



the instrument will record in 




below the pointer the total 



since 



flying 



the last overhaul was ca 




ows 



time 
out. 






pair 
the time of flight in 
This figure has many uses. It enables the 
pilot to enter correctly in his log book the 
total time he has been in the air; it records 
for the ground engineers the number of 

hours the engine has run, or the aeroplane 



speed. This is carried out by 



The clock inside the air log works onlv when 
the aircraft is in flight at a speed in excess 
of stalling 

means of a capsule, connected like that of 
the air speed indicator to the Fitot head, 
distension of which 
of 




an escapement permi 




in the release 

the clock 



- 



mechanism to begin recording the passage 
of flying time. 



* 



? 



3 









p 



% 



THE 




MAGAZINE 










NEW DOUBLETS 




It is a considerable time since we gave our readers a series of 
doublet puzzles to solve, and for the benefit of newcomers we 
explain the requirements of this form of word competition. 

Many years ago the doublet puzzle was almost as popular as the 

■--—--" - ■ ------ - flie 

rcle of friends 
They received it with great en- 
thusiasm, and he was persuaded 



crossword puzzle is to-day. It was invented by Lewis 
author of "Alice in Wonderland," to amuse his large circ 




» 



Raise 





DIVER 
FLOUR 



to 
in 




■ 




WATER 
BREAD 










to 






ROC* 
Wreck SHIP 



\\ 



-ith 



TREE 
GK. 








uce it to the public, 
with whom it caught on im- 
mediately and became quite 



a craze. 



A doublet consists of two 



given words, 




containing 



the same number of letters. The 



puzzle requires one word to be 

changed to the other by placing 
connecting words between. The 
connecting words are known as 
"links," and must differ from 
the preced ing link bv the altera- 




tion of one letter only 
words of the same length may 
be used, obviously, and the test 

the change in the 
number of links. 

make the idea clear we 
give the following: examples: 
Put LOAD in 





LOAD-lord-cord-card-CART 
Protect CAT from DOG 
CAT-cot-dot-DOG 



In making the links only 




words appear in 




in a 





ictionarv 

er nouns, names of 
places, etc., are not 
permitted. It is important 




on 

In judging tin* 
12 doublets will be considered 
as one contest, and prizes 
of Meccano or Hornby Train 

to the value of 21/-, 
10/6 and 5/- respec- 

will ie awarded to 



goods 

15/ 

tively 

the senders of the four solu- 

g the* lowest total 






.■ 



« 




I _ 




ot links used throughout, 
the event of a tie for 



In 

anv 



of the 

be given 
the 






preference will 

entry having 

most novel 




me i 



it 



will be observed that 



combination of the 12 

doublets for judging purposes 

ensure that a brilliant 






will 

solution of one doublet will 

carry its full weight 

setting to some 







ofl- 



to secure the 
in another. 




Entries should be addressed 
to "Doublets, Meccano Maga- 
zine, Binns Road, 




"The Young Harbour Master/' by J. R. TotUe, Taunton. This charming picture, taken at 
CloveUy, N. Devon, was awarded First Prize in the A Section of the "August Photo Contest" 



13," 

office 





t han 30th 




remember that the first solution 

arrived at is not necessarily the shortest. Competitors should go over 

in search of short cuts that will eliminate unnecessary links. Close 

study will often reveal overlapping links that may be removed. 

The doublets to be solved are as follows: 



November. There will be a 

duplicate set of prizes for 
the best entries from Overseas readers, whose solutions must 

• m 

reach us not later than 







i February 1939. 




Make 

Dye 

Jut 



COAL 

WET 

PEAT 
TOWN 



on 

to 

for 
into 



snip 




CITY 



Entries must be written on one side of the paper only, and 
each sheet of paper used must bear the competitor's name and 
address. The total number of links used must be noted in the 



top right corner of the first sheet. 



All 



"MM." 



competitions are set 




for the purpose of 







■ 




NEWT 



in 



BLACK 
POND 



amusement, and as this is one in which every reader at Home and 
Overseas can take part on equal terms, we look forward to a 
really big number of entries. The names of the prize winners in 
the Home section will be published in the January issue. 



November 




Contest 



Each month throughout the winter we 




to 



shall hold drawing competitions, open 

readers of all ages. No special subjects will 
be set, 



Winter Photo 




ests 






C O M P ETITI O N RESULTS 





















simply for the best drawings or paintings 

submitted during the month. Entries may 

be of any size, mounted or unmounted. 

Each month's entries will be divided into 



As wa. announced in our last issue, we 
have decided to continue our photographic 
contests throu 




the winter 






the usual two sections, A for readers aged 
16 and over and B for those under 16; and 
prizes of Meccano products or artist's 
materials, as chosen bv the winners, to the 
value of 21/- and 10/6 will be awarded in 
each section. There will be separate sections 
with similar prizes for Overseas readers. 

Entries 
must 
Contest, 
Liverpool 



The conditions of the winter series of 
contests will be similar to those held during 
the summer. Any outdoor photographs of 
autumn and winter interest will be eligible, 
but indoor subjects will be restricted to 




top photographs of the type described 
in the article on page 612 of this issue. 

Entries will be divided into the usual two 
sections, A for readers aged 16 and over; 
B for those under 16. Prizes of Meccano 

>r photographic materials to 



HOME 

September Photo Contest.— First Prizes: Section A, 

Miss A. Roe (Sheffield); Section B, J. C. Needham 

(Enfield). Second Prizes: Section A, Miss J. Wedgwood 

(Oxford); Section B, M. Pickett (Burton-on-Trcnt). 

Consolation Prizes: M. L. Done (Wednesbury); P, 
Glendennikg (London S.W.I 7); W. B. Greenfield 
(Ciatc-shcad); A. Graham (Edinburgh 4); R. Storey 
(Bamohurst); V, A. Thomson (Sandcrstead). 

September Crossword Puzzle,— 1. W. K, Cocking 
(Redruth). 2. G. Patterson (Manchester), 3. A, C. Robb 

(L'pion, Wirral), 4. J. Y, Browne (Luton). Consolation 
Prizes: J. W. Billing* (Brighton); L. \V. Chittv 

(London S.W.20); W. C. 

A. New (New Barnet). 



' 



Han san (Glasgow E.l); 









com 



''November Dra 




lion 



ii'tJtL; 



azine, Binns Road, 
must arrive not later 

than 30 th November. Overseas closing 

date, 2Bth February 1939. 



value of 21/- and 10/6 will be 

in each section. Entries to this month's con- 

test should be addressed "November Photo 

Contest, Meccano Magazine, Binns Road 



Liverpool 13." Closing dates: Home section, 




November: Overseas section 



February 1939. 



28th 



OVERSEAS 

June Photo Contest.— First Prizes: Section A r T. 

Watson (West Leichardt, N.S.W,); Section B, P. 
GlLLKS (MoiitpclTier, France). Second Prizes: Section A, 

IL. W. Humm (Geraldine, ' N.Z.): Section B, C. R. 
Anderson (Timara, N.7.). Consolation Prize: P. 
Macdunald (Toronto), 

June Crossword Puzzle.— 1. E. A. Bunt (Capetown). 
2. M, P. Sesji (Madras). 3. L. Hukter (Caledun, 
S. Africa). 4, W. B. Moore (Toronto). Consolation 
Prizes: P. Cuthhert (Mowbrav, S. Africa); R. W. 

Roddick (Rosario de Santa Fe, Argentine), 






604 



THE MECCANO MAGAZINE 




NO ACCOMMODATION 



Bill: "Go back and lick him." 
Jack: ''But he's tfivcn me two bh 



ack eyes already, 11 



Bill: - *WelI t he can't give vou anv more, can he?" 

• * * « 

■ 

T aehen "As we walk out-of-doors on a cold winter's 



illumine and look about lis. what do we see on every 




7" 



Class: ** Gloves 



?i 









• 



ii 



Boss: "Who was that on the phone? 
New Office Boy: '"Somebody rang up and said, 'It's 
a long distance from Paris/ So I said "Any fool knows 

that/ and rang oil. 

A prospective employer was interviewing a charlady* 

* Where did you work last?" he asked, 

"Remember Mr. Briggs, sir. wot died so sudden? 

Well, 1 did for him!" 

• * * * 




Give me a sentence with the w 
metre 4 in it/ 1 

Tommy: "My aunt came to stay with m, 

centimetre at the station!" 

« * # 




i.,.-, 





I was 



Nejfro Patient: "Doctor! doctor! I was playing de 
mouth organ, an* swallowed iti fl 

Doctor " Keep calm, man, and be thankful you were 
not playing the piano." 

^ J * ft ft « * 

teach vou at 




Motorist Father; "What did I 
school to-day, sonny? 11 

"Oh, teacher told us all about Columbus, who went 
2,000 mile* cm a gallon." 



"Won Id you like a high tee or a low tee* sir?" asked 
the caddie, 

"What does it matter to you whether I have a high 
tea or a fish supper?" roared the novice golfer. "Von 

put the ball on the bump and let's get on with the 

game." 






* 






* 



* 






t* 



Old Lady: "Aren't you afraid you will catch cold on 

such a night as this, my boy? 

Newsboy: "No, mum. Selling papers keeps up 

the circulation/ 1 

* * * * 

Bob; "What did Noah say when he heard the rain 
falling on the rpof?" 
Bert: '"Ark!" 

• s » 






Mose: "Dat child o* yourn am mighty stow learnt n' 

at school, How does yo* account fo* dat?" 

Past us; "Well, de school am two miles from heah, 
an* dat chile done fo'gits all de teachah tells him fo* 
he git half wav home. 



it 






* 



HOPEFUL 




"Can 1 get into the park 



Stout lady to little boy: 
through this pate?* 1 

Bov: ! I guess so. lidv. A cart-load of hav just went 







** 



LIGHT FARE 

Customer (in restaurant): " Another sandwich, 
please/' 

Waiter: "Yes, sir, and is there anything else? 
Customer: "Yes, bring a paper-weight; the last 

sandwich blew awav." 

♦ * * * 

CRACKED! 







Famous detective inspecting the scene of a crime: 
* Gracious, this is more serious than I thought. This 

window has been broken on both sides/* 

• « • ii 

Landlady: "A professor formerly occupied this 
rocuUp sir. He invented an explosive/* 

Xt«w Lodger: "Ah, I suppose those spots on the 
ceiling are the explosive?" 

Landlady: "No, they're the professor." 



» 




me. Fd 



"Are you Hungary? 1 

"Well, come along; III Fiji." 

* * * 

The manager of a cinema was interviewing an 

applicant for the position of attendant. 

■'What would von do in a case of lire?" he asked. 

"Oh f " said the man, "don't worry 

soon get out/ 1 

ft ft * * 

The examining lawyer was questioning an Irish- 
woman in court with regard to the stairs in her house. 
"Nnw t my good woman, please tell the court how 

the stairs run in your house/ 1 

"How do the stairs rvm?" repeated the woman. 
"Shure t when Tin upstairs iliey run down, and when 

I'm downstairs they run up/ 1 

* * ^ ft • 

Detective: "Got away, has he? Did you guard all 

the exits' 

Village Policeman: "Yes, hut we think he must have 

slipped through one of the entrances." 

* • * * 



4* 






M 



me this car two weeks * 

"Yea. sir." 

"Tell me again all you said about it then. Fro getting 

discouraged/* 

ft • • ft 

Doctor: "Tve given you tablets this week instead of 

pills. Tommy;* 1 

Toramv: "But I want pills." 

Docton "Why? There's no :differtifcfcW 
Tomnu^ "Isn't there? Rave you ever tried blowing 
tablets through a peashooter?" 

ft * * 



end 



his labourer 



asleep under a hedge in the middle of the afternoon* 
Eyeing the roan with a smile, he said: "Slape on f ye 
idle treat ure. slape on. So long as ye slape ye 1 
job, but when ye wake ye* re out of work/ 1 



ve got a 



* 



ft 



THIS MONTH'S HOWLER , 

"Etiquette is the noise vou make when yon sneeze/* 







CONCERN 



M 



"Daddv, I want to ask you a question 
"Certainly, son; go ahead/" 

"Whv do you wind up businesses when you want 

them to stop?'* 

ft • ft ft 

An Irish recruit in a cavalry regiment fell oil his 
horse, The sergeant strode up to him and de 
"Did you receive orders to dismount?" 
"J did, sor/* 
"Where from? 1 * 
"From hindquarters/ 1 said Paddy. 

ft « 



The sh 




MEN OF LETTERS 

lerd and the old cowman were discussing 

the new squire, and the conversation was as follows: 

• "I.GE.B.A.OJJ.E." 
"E.B., B.E.?" 
"I. E.B/ 1 
cowman: "YJi.E.A.O.B.E.?" 





; "Y.E,B.A.M.l\ f U,C^ i 
Cowman: "O.L, LC/ 1 



ft 



* 





: '"What kind of filling do you want in this 
. son?" 



Billy: "Chocolate, please. 



i* 



* 



• 



« 



• 



* 



Professor: "Why are summer days longer than 

winter days?" 

Student: 4l The heat expands them/* 

ft 9 ft * 

"Iceland" said the teacher, "is about as large as 

Siam." 

11 Iceland/ 1 wrote Herbert afterwards, "is about as 

biiz as teacher/ 1 

« • • • 

Paddy walked into a newspaper office and said he 
wanted to insert an announcement of the death of a 



friend 









"How much do you charge?" he said. 
"Ten shillings ati inch," was the replv. 
"Bcgorrah," said Paddv, "he was six fc^t tall." 



ft 



Street orator: "We must get rid of Radicalism, 
Socialism, Bolshevism, Communism* and Anarchism/ 1 

Voice from crowd: "While you're about it, why not 

throw in rheumatism?" 



* 



« 



ft 






The tramp called at a cottage and a^ked for food. 
''Mow would you like a nice chop?" said the owner 
of the cottage kindly. 

"That all depends, lady — -is it lamb f pork or wood?** 



* 



* 






LABOUR SAVING! 




Man having Ins hair cut; "Why do you insist upon 
telling me these horrible stories?" 

Barber: "I'm sorry, sir, but when I tell stories like 
that, the hair stands up on end f and makes it much 

easier to cut, sir." 






♦ 



« 



THE 





XV 









%'V 



STEAM ENGINES (From 12'6 to 47'6> 

and WORKSHOP MODELS (From 2'g to ice) 









t 















GRINDSTONE 

True to detail and moulded 
throughout in Bakelite. 

Price 2(6 

(Postage and pecking 6d I 



■ _ 



i_ n 



MODEL PRESS. Small Poyer Press, with Jin, plungaf and die, 

plated tftbfa. Can be diiven by any of our 
Electric Motor, 



Attractively finished with 

■ 

steam-engines or by cur 






Price 5/6 
(Postage and packing 6d) 






I 



■b • 



.;•# 



Mersey Models are obtainable from all the 



and leading 
of your nearest 



shops, Send lor 



and 









You can build Mersey Models into Meccano models, 

gearing made from Meccano 
(securing by screws to the wood base), as the gear 



wheels and 
Meccano. 



are of the same standard 






Send for fully illustrated 

catalogue* (Free) 



••fc 






• 



MERSEY 
MODEL No. 51 

Price 12/6 

(Carriage and packing 9d.J 



MODEL DRILL, 

High Speed Drilf, 

bell 



Ver 

■ 

driven by 

r Jockey 

by hand 

finished 



spring DeJt oven 

pulleys,, operated 
lever Attractively 

with plated pulleys, etc. Casi 
be tft ivah by any of our steam- 
engines or by our Electric 
Motor. Price 71 6 

(Postage and packing 6d) 






■ % 



MODEL LATHE. This 3 in* Centre Model Ftai-bed 
lathe is filled with headstock, taiistock and si ids rest. 
\e tatter can be operated ai any angle Drive is by 
iwo speed V Pulley, Can be driven by any of our 
steam-engines or by our Stearic Mclor. Plated 
finish. Price 10/6 (Postage and packing 6d.) 



Manufacturers MERSEY MODEL CO. LTD 



MODEL CIRCULAR SAW. This model is of sturdy design and 
has an adjustable table. Can be driven by any ol our steam-engines 



or by our Electric Motor 



Price 4/6 (Postage and packing 6d.\ 

■ . ■-. 



er's Buildi 







Complete 

with 
Rear Lamp 




"WILCO" FAVOURITES 




■Wilco" 
Cycle Dyna- 
mo 

This beau- 
cilul all 

chromium 

sec has 
our standard 

running dynamo, and the headlamp 
Is fitted with 2 bulbs, both of which 
work from dynamo or battery and 
arc controlled by a rotary switch on 
lamp. A fully guaranteed set that 
you will be proud to own. 
Other models from 14/9 to 23/9. 



4- volt Permanent Magnet 
Motor for speed boats, etc. 



ball bearing, easy 



A first class A.C, 
Motor, 200/250 
vofts. Seff-Iubrtcat- 
ing bearings, silent 
running and ex- 
cellent for Meccano 
model driving, also 
geared type for 
cine-proiectors 

etc 








Miniature Fittings, Complete 
with bulb t flex and clip for \f 
battery. 1 V to 24* high. Each ■ * 

Post ad- 




Post 4d 

Ideal 4- volt Motor for 
Meccano models and ipeed 
boats, base plate drilled for 
easy mounting. 



Post 6d. 

(un-geare 



(as Jllus,} 

Post 64. 



Ironclad Gear* 
ed Motor, 4-6- 
vole. Very 
powerful indeed 
and will work 

from batteries or 
off A,C. mains 
through > 

"Wilco" 







Posted 




-WILCO 11 Low Voltage 

with speed regulator, reduces 200-250 vc* 

A,C, to 2-8 volts. Capacity 3 amperes. 

Will drive small motors perfectly 



Transformer 

Price 



15 



/ 






Our best 

Dynamo will light up your Models 
or Railway with SIX 3.5-volt 
Bulbs. 



fO/250-vt. 
A,C. Geared nrw 
Mains Motor uU m 
Just right for driving 
models. 




3/-. Post 4d. 

Shocking Coil. Operates 
from a Standard dry battery. 

Other models up to 45/- each. 



44 oage Catalogue Entirely Revised- Full of Good Lines, 4d. Post Free. 
L. WILKINSON, "Electric House/' 204, Lower Addiscombe Rd. p CROYDON 








r 






Complete A.A. GUN Detachment 
Complete SEARCHLIGHT 
MODERN TRENCH LAYOUT 

Sets of Figures, ARMY. TERRITORIAL, R.A.F. and Civilian- 



IN SCALE 
MODELS 

price 4/6 

price 4/ 
price 




AIRPORT Buildings, 




etc., and all accessories 



to rSnd scale. 




WARTIME and MODERN AlkCRAFT. 



Complete Models or Constructive Sets. All to scale in this WORLD 

FAMOUS Series. 
LATEST ADDITIONS: The BLACKBURN "SKUA." 



Constructive Set price 4/6 




model 12/6. 



4 



SKYBIRDS "MAMMOTH" Hangar price 10/6. 
If unable to obtain from local agents, write; 



" 



SKYBIRDS" (Des 





3, ALDERMANBURY AVE., LONDON E.C.2. 




XVI 





MAGAZINE 







Dx53a 



- 



■w-~ JU 



■: 






t 












■ I 



Here's a bicycle lamp and 

battery with a BEAM UK* 

A SEARCHLIGHT ! 



H 



. 



■ 






.A«T1 



, - - 



\ m ■ 






V -_% ■ 






T > 



-C 






\- 



& 



. ■: 



3S 



iV 






£-» 



,•_ ■ 



9 ■ I 



>:-: Si : 



■:-:■: 






s. 



tf 






:■:■" 



' aj «■ 



SEE 



Every cyclist should have a drydex 

lamp. It gives a tremendously power- 
motorists dip their head- 
lights toDRYDEx! And don't dkydex 
batteries last ! 

drydex lamps cost from 1/9 complete 

with battery and spare bulb 
The lamps have a handy handle 
carrying and hanging on tent poles. 
And always ask for drydex batteries 
for your refills. They give you lasting 
brilliance because a drydex battery 

'still keeps going tvhen the rest have 

s 1 4% 




From ail good dealers artd^ Exide Service Stations 



.»"■■ 



v.- 



Vb 









■:-_-:■; 



:■:■< 



-•-->■ 



_ - ■■■■' 






.:=■ - _-■• 



'< 



a 



:-.: 



Sf "'■ 



l-r- 



¥m r - 



!>■: 



■ 



w 



/> 



-- 



K 



w 






» 



. 



REST 



- 

CocA turkeys are as alert as watch does and 
so poachers 



Sft? 



3£r: 



■ 




ays gwe 




m m</r berth? 






OF 




The Chin ride 1 
Clifton Junctt 



n 




S(ecir Jail Storage Co, Ltd- (Exidc & Drydtex Batteries) Exide Works, 
; ntv Manchester. Atst at Lmfaft* Afamifittr, Birmingham^ Bristol^ 

Glargfiw & Br! fast 



♦ 



SECCOTINE is the one and only DOUBLE STRENGTH 



ADHESIVE 



—and twice as strong as any 
So use SECCOTINE for making and me 




luel 




ing your mo 



dels 




for repairs about the house-for sticking Broken 



Glass, Wood, Metal — in fact for almost anything that can 
be stuck! 



Remember, too, when you ask for SECCOTINE 




certain you get SECCOTINE and refuse all imitations 
give them wide berth! 



SECCOTINE 



is 





all good stationers and stores in 



pin-stopper tubes, 4£d., 6d., 9d., complete with instructions 
for use. 




TYPEWRITER 



u t m o s t 



possess. 

Specimens of characters: 




Model A in case 5'-; Model R 6'6; Model S 10'6 (42 characters) 



/ 




H 






COTIN 



TH 



C€+r* 



POST 



THIS COUPON 



CAW. STEVENSON 



Dept 



ORR LIMIT 



BELFAST 



I should like to have, post free, copies of your Free Bookl 

describe the many uses of Seccotine. 



which 




15'- (60 larg 



e 




small 



characters); Model T 2V- (68 large and 

characters) 

Guaranteed for 2 years 




The improve 

TOY TYPEWRITER 

with sliding carriage 



Prints 36 Characters on paper or 
card 6" wide, any length. Alpha- 

and numerals 




MODEL R, each 




FROM ALL TOY DEALERS 



Write for list "C" and soecimen of writing to 






me 



res* 











MECCANO MAGAZINE 



xvii 




- 



r 










type main 



plete. Other sets 

Lamps from 1/9. 

at your 



Catalogue free frorr 

. MILLER 6c CO. LTD 

BIRMINGHAM, 6 
LONDON: Devonshire H. 



CYCLE 



Charlotte St., W.i 



DYNAMO 



SETS 







uild your 



own 




Only a few 



■ 






tools require 



Stuart No. 10. 

machined 
instructions: 
from 18'$ post free 






All our sets from 5/- upwards, illustrated and 

described in our No. Z catalogue, 6cL pose free. 

fully illustrated. 

STUART TURNER LTD. 

Henley-on-Thames 











Send 6dL in stamps for 48 page Illustrated Catalogue 

■ 





MELLOR (IS ) 




5. BREWIS ROAD 
-ON-SEA. N. WALES 




SOMETHING 











I 





I 







LOTT 



j 




BRICKS 



series) 



You wane to build modern 






type buildings? Then you'll 
like these new Lott's Bricks, 
An entirely brand-new series 

including new design SUN 
TRAP windows and doors. 

They're sold in attractive 
Stiver Boxes with transparent 

■ 

windows and wrappings, but 




Box 4. 10/ 




y 



Ou 



stilt 




p the Old 



Series (which are as popular as ever) you'll find your dealer 



has them 






New Series Prices: 




/ 



6, 




/ 



*■ 




I 




10 



/ 



and Supplementary Sets 1 y 6 and 2 7 6 






For 




No 



00 Gauge 







These novel and inexpensive Toy Stone Building Bricks are 
just right for your railway scenery. Be sure to ask your 




r for full particulars. 








7 




old 

CH 



favourite 





as 



good 



as 



ever 



Box 6. 27/6 



chance to 




We can't improve on it. And 

you! 

the 



as a hobby neither can 



fun you could 
sets like these. If 



are interested 



. 



in experi- 
ments at school, here's your 

experiment for 
yourself — and to show the 



what a 



worth-while 
Lott's 



really 



There's 



pastime 
Chemistry 



an 



is. 

illus- 



trated Book of 









dealer 



Experi rnents 

written by a 
Doctor of Science 
with each of these 

and your 

spare 



sets, 
stocks 



chemicals and equipment. 



Prices: 3'6, 5'-,8'6,12'6, 21'-, 27'6 to 105' 






Write for Illustrated Price Lists of all Lott's Products in- 



cluding Electricity Sets and Chemistry Spares. The Real 

Apparatus illustrated, together with additional supplies of 
chemicals, will enable you to keep pace with your advancing 
knowledge* 









Ask your Toy Dealer for full particulars or write to 

, M.M.) for illustrated lists of all products. 

stamp on p.c, I \d. stamp on letters, please, 








X V 1 1 1 





MAGAZINE 







™ 



CHOCOLATE VAN 
"CADBURY'S" 

This van is beautifully enamelled 
in blue with white roof. 

Price 213 



•No. 1 CATTLE TRUCK 

Fitted with sliding doors 
Very realistic ' 

Pr,ce 213 




Ihe Ho/nDy Sviws includes a splendid range of realistic Rolling Stock. Each item is fitted with patented and exclusive 

automatic couplings, a special feature that places it in a class entirely of its own. There are Pullman Cars, Passenger Coaches, 
Guards' Vans. Tipping Wagons, Lumber Wagons, and many other types, all beautifully finished. 

Attractive selection of Hornby Rolling Stock is illustrated and described on this page. Ask yourdealerforacompletoprice list. 





SAUSAGE VAN 

"PALETHQRPES" 

Fitted with sliding doors 

Price 213 





No. 2 HIGH CAPACITY WAGON 
Finished in correct colours of G-W.R. and LMS. "Loco 
Coal" Wagons, or LN.E.fc "Brick" Wagon. Not suitable 

for I ft; radius raits. Price 4/- 




HOPPER WAGON 

Mechanically 
Finished in green 




Price 3/ 



MftK V 1 




No 



PULLMAN COACH 

Price 1/3 













M 



OIL TANK WAGON 

ROYAL DAYLIGHT" 
Price Ifll 



•FLAT TRUCK 

Complete with Container. 

Price 2!- 

CONTAINERS 

LM S. (FurniiureJ. L.N.E R. 
(Goods), G.W.R. (Insulated). 

S.R. (Ventilated). 

Price 6d. each. 




*No. 2 
Opening doors, 
rails. 



CATTLE TRUCK 

Not suitable for I ft radius 

Price 4/6 




MILK TANK WAGON 
"NESTLES MILK" 

Price 4/6 




No. 1 PASSENGER COACH 

Price 2/6 



"PORTLAND CEMENT" 

WAGON 

The d 



*;■ 






at the top opens. 

Finished in bright yellow, 

^ 1111 







Wo. 2 TIMBER WAGON 

Not suitable for I ft. radius rails. 



Price 2/6 



No. 1 PETROL TANK 

WAGON "ESSO" 

Price t/11 



No. 2 LUMBER WAGON 

Fitted with bolsters and stanchions. Noi suitable for 1 fi. 
radius rails. Price 2/11 



COAL WAGuN 
Fitted with embossed repre- 
sentation of coat. Pried 2/3 







No. REFRIGERATOR VAN 
Lettered ! L.M.S,. G.W,. N.E. or 
S.R. Finished with the appro* 
priaie details. Price US 



No. 2 SALOON COACH 

L M.S. or L.NXR. Not suitable for 1 ft. radius rails 

Price 10/6 






•No. 

Not suits 



2 PASSENGER COACH 
for t ft. radius raits. First-third or 

Price 7/- 







LUMBER WAGON 

with bofstsn and 

ns for log transport 
Pike 1 3 



■ 







•No. 1 WAGON 






Price 1/6 



L.M.S. 

rails. 



nu. 2 UOAHIDUR COACH 

Brake composite. Not suitable for 1 ft radius 

Price 7i 6 

*Leucred L.M.S. 



'No. 2 CORRIDOR COACH 
G.W. First-third. Not unable for I ft. radius rails. 

Price 7/6 
N.E., Q.W. or S.R. 



♦OPEN WAGON "B M 
Fitted with centre tarpaulin 

supporting rati. 

Price 2/- 







A 







f 












/ 














*J-f „ 



* ■&» 



•" 



1 " " *fc 









, T J ...■■- £„ - - 












THE MECCANO MAGAZINE 



XIX 



r 




i 













There is a splendid range of Railway Accessories in the Hornby Series, each 
one built in perfect proportion and beautifully finished. With these realistic 

accessories the most elaborate model railway can be constructed and operated 
in exactly the same manner as a real railway. 

A selection of Hornby Accessories is shown on this page. Ask your dealer to show you 



the full range 




GAUGE O 




No. 4 STATION 

Built up with three detachable sections. Named "Margate/ **Wembley/* 
with accessible Booking Hall and Ticket Office Barrier 



*» . 



» » ■ 



»•* 



"Ripon" or "Reading." Strikingly coloured. 

Price 10/6 



*■* 



ft ft « 











No. 4E STATION 






This Station is fitted for electric fighting, otherwise it is the same as No, 4 Station 



*» » 



mm 






Price 11/9 



14 





No. i 
WATER TANK 

Height 7 in. 

Fitted with flexible 

tube and valve lever 



Price 2/6 





No. 2 SIGNAL, 
DOUBLE ARM 

Home" and 
"Distant." 

Price 2/1 



* 4 



f « 



GRAPHITE 
GREASE 

For Springs. 

Price 
per tube 6d, 



No. 2 

JUNCTION 

SIGNAL 

ftn 

H o m e ' ' or 

Discant/'Slgnal 
arms operated 
by Uvers at base. 
A very realistic 
model. Price 5/- 





MANSELL 

WHEELS 

These solid die-cast 



Wheels can be fitted 
to Hornby Coaches, 




No. 2A BUFFER STOPS 

Hydraulic type. Price 2/9 

No. 3A BUFFER STOPS 
Similar tn design to No. 2A Buffer 

. but fitted for use with 




GRAPH 

POLES 

Price 

per pair 

3/- * 



No. 2 
LAMP 

STANDARD 

Price 3/9 



Vans, etc 
Price per pair 



3d. 





No. 2 LEVEL CROSSING 

Measures 13 J x 1 1 in M with two 

tracks of gauge O rails In position* 

Price 5/3 

No. E2 LEVEL CROSSING 

(Electrical) 

Similar to Level Crossing No, 2 
excepting that a third rail is 
fitted in each of the two tracks. 



Price 7/3 




Hornby Solid Steel Track. Price 3/6 



No. I SIGNAL CABIN 

Finished In colours. 



Price 2/6 



PLATELAYERS HUT 

Price 1/2 





No.2SIGNALCABIN 

Dimensions: Heigh t6 \ in., 
width 34 in., Iength6£ln. 

Roof and back open to 

allow Lever Frame to be 
fitted inside cabin if 
desired. Price 3/6 




No. I 
TURNTABLE 

Price |/lt 



VIADUCT 
VIADUCT 

VIADUCT 



Price 6/9 VIADUCT (Electrical) 
Centre Section onty 
(Electrical) Centre Section only 



• *4 



Price 7/6 

Price 4/6 

Price S/- 



No. I ENGINE SHED 
This Shed will accommodate any Loco- 
motive and Tender with an overall length 
not exceeding 8J in. Price 15 6 







No. 3 STATION 
Length 16f In., width 6 in., height 6 in. .*• 



#* + 



Price 5/9 





• 



# 



LIV 








-* n 



I . 



"VU 



* . 







THE MECCANO MAGAZINE 






• * 






THIS PIFCO METER 

WILL 







ELECTRICAL 



II 



With this sensitive in 










strument you can make 
literally thousands of 

tests. You can find what 

gone wrong with 
your radio, test electric 

train circuits, trans- 
formers, bells, motors 
and carry out many 
interesting experiments 
as well. 



RANGES 

0-5 volts 

0-20 volts 
0-100 volts 
0-400 volts 
0-10 mA 
0-50 m A 
0-250 mA 

Resist/valve test. 
Plug-in test for 
valves. 







Complete in velvet-lined case with testing leads. 




PIFCO RADIOMETER. The only instrument of its kind 
in the world for making both A.C and D.C. Tests. 



0-6 volts. 



RANGES 

0-240 volts. 



0-30 mA 



Filament and Resistance Test, and socket for ptug-in test 

for valves, 8,000 ohms Resistance. Complete 
with two 15-inch flex cables. Fitted with 
PIFCO DRY CELL, 




Your regular dealer can supply vou, or write: 
PIFCO LTD., Watiiw St., MANCHESTER, 
London Address: 58, City Road, E.C.I, 



Road, E.C.I, 



- 



PlFCO> 



THE SHERLOCK HOLMES 
OF RADIO 






m 







1/24 Full Size 

SCAL 




KITS 




ACTUAL PHOTOGRAPH OF MODEL BUILT FROM KIT 
HAWKER "FURY" MARK II. Wing Span 15 inches 



FOSTER WIKNER "WICKO" 
TIGER MOTH" 



II 




151 in. 






■ m * 



• * * 



"LEOPARD MOTH" 
MILES "MAGISTER" 
HAWKER "FURY" 






• M 



• ■ • 



** 



9t 



n 







HAWKER "HIND" 



I* 



n 



(POSTAGE 6d. EXTRA) 



14| in. 

18f in. 

17 in. 

15 in. 

18f in. 



Price 3/ 



• « * 



■ * ■ 



n 



r§ 



. i 



/* 



ti 



3/6 
3/6 



3/6 





KITS CAN BE SEEN AT MOST GOOD CLASS TOY SHOPS 




TRADE CONCESSIONAIRES: Mersey Model Co. 
Ltd., Coopers Building, Church Street, Liverpool. 

Send 1^d. stamp and as«< for illustrated literature describing AEROMODELS FLYING 
SCALE KITS AND NON-FLYING SCALE KITS, and AERO LARK FLYING KIT, 

also lists of MATERIALS AND ACCESSORIES to: 



A 






M 




DELS 



LTD 



48, LARK LANE, 
LIVERPOOL 17. 




■ 










GRAM D 
STORIES 

PICTURES 








■ 

THE MECCANO 





tf 




» 







will 




n 




bl 







your 




ilms 



and 



make 






*. 



* 




Johnson's 




Outfit 



includes 






Dark Room 




m 






ing 






Dishes, 



, Glass Measure, 



Thermometer, WalieL 



Azol, 



Amidol Packet, 3 M.Q. Packets 

Tin of Acid Fixing, and 



an 




complete instructions. 





Of any dealer, or post free 

on receipt of P.O. 



Send at once for out Free Booklet on 

DEVELOPING, PRINTING AND 

FLASHLIGHT 



Address all letters to E/M Dept. 






Manufacturing 
t Chemists Ltd. 



HENDON, LONDON N.W.4 



XXI 





No. 12 Daisy Single Shot. 



price. Very accurate. Also shoots 




rts. 




350-shot lever action repeater 



No. 195 




Daisy Buzz Barton 
1.000-shot bfued-steel 

with new tcfescopic-type sights. 



13 




No. 25 



Gun. 



action 50-shot 



Powerful. Back sight adjustable. 




Double Barret 

Breaks for cocking. 50-shot 
barrel. Automatic safety 




This 

Two- 

doubies size of image. 



Bulls Eye Shot. Only shot approved 




225 




lets only 4d. per tube. 



Daisy engineers. Tube of 



TARGETEER, the gun that's fun 

Complete pistol target outfit, 
eating air pistol, 2 types 




of targets. Use box as a back- 
stop. Set up anywhere. 



Complete 10 



/ 




If you are under 17 years of age, purchases must be made by an adult 

No Firearms Certificate is necessary. 

Booklet of Models sent FREE, address 



ROLLINS & SONS (London) LTD., 17, St. Bride St., London E.CA 

Stocked by all Leading Cycle and Sports Dealers. 










MADE IN 
U.S.A. 





XXI 1 







GAUGE 



GAUGE 




Although our standard tinplate rails are the acknowledged best of their class, we have felt that in order 












to do juslice to the speed and hauling power of our locomotives, especially "PRINCESS ELIZABETH" 
and E420 "ETON," a drawn steel rail was essential. Our object was to proc 

■ 




miniature 



railway track, and we have achieved our aim in the new system of electric steel rails and points that 
we introduced recently. These rails are of the very highest quality- yet are sold at reasonable prices. 
We are confident that they will give satisfaction, not only to Hornby Train users, but to all model 






railway enthusiasts. The track is joined up by means of fishplates which are supplied with each rail. 









i 



j-1 



ELECTRIC STRAIGHT RAILS 



EB3i 



a m. 



til 






**• 



Mr 



Straight Rails {Length 23 inj 
Straight Half Rails ... 
Straight Quarter Rails 

TSR Electrical Terminal for Solid Section 

per patr Ad. 



each 2' 8 



ELECTRICAL POINTS 



(Hand Operated) 



EPR3 Right-hand Point 



iPL3 



Left-hand Points 



*»• 



■ «# 



each 8' 3 



ft* » 



+ #* 



**■ 









ELECTRIC CURVED RAILS 



EA3 



Curved Roils ... 

EA3i Curved Half Raits ... 



*»• 



each 2'8 

„ 1'7 



FISHPLATES 

For joining up track ... Price, d 



Adapting Pieces, for connecting Hornby Solid Steel Track to Hornby 



Tjnptata Track 



in 



I4l 



# . . 



Pel box of six V 



Manufactured 



MECCANO LIMITED, BINNS ROAD 



LIVERPOOL 



QUALITY FEATURES OF NEW 
ELECTRIC SOLID STEEL TRACK 






I, RAILS Solid diawn steel section, zinc 
coated to prevent rust and to ensure 

electrical contact the space 
required for a circle made up of 10 

Curved rails is 6ft. 8 in. 

SLEEPERS, Pressed steel, of similar 
design (o the siael sleepers used on 
actual railway s. Each sleeper is pierced 
so that the track can be screwed down 
to a wood base. 

POINTS. On solid base, providing the 
greatest possible rigidity. Lever move- 
ment simple and posiiive. Righl-hand 
and Left-hand points available. 




- * 



m 









f >» 



EBl 



4 



k 



ECU 






EA2J 



EBi 



EA2 



m — — 






EPPL2 






i 



EDS1 



EDSR2 



GAUGE O, U*. 

Horn by 




ERIE 









, Points and Crossings are built for hard wear and for 



running 



There is practically no limit to the number of rail formations that 



r n in 



dets 



Hornby Layouts 



can be built with them. Their adaptability is 

"How to Plan your Hornby Railway" and 

Suggestions," both of which may be obtained from your dealer, price 

3d., or from Meccano Ltd., Binns Road, Liverpool 13, price 4d. 

SELECTION OF RAILS, POINTS AND CROSSINGS 

FOR ELECTRIC TRAINS 



* ■■ * 



EBl Straight rails ... 

EBJ „ half rails 

EA2t Curved quarter rails 
(2 it. radius) 

EA2 Curved rails (2 ft. radius) 

EPPR2 Parallel points, right-"! 

hand 
EPPL2 Parallel points, left- I 

hand •♦* .„ ... j 

These points can be used with 

either I ft. or 2 ft. radius track. J 

t-hand points 
(2 ft. radius) 

EPL2 Left-hand ' points 

{2 ft. radius) 

EPK1 Right-hand points {1 

ft. radius) . 

EPL1 Left-hand points (1 ft. 



per doz 



EDSl Straight rails, double 
track 



4*9- 






EDSR2 Double symmetrical 
oints, right-hand (2 ft. 






radius) 



• * * 



»** 



* ft • 



pair 7/ 






per pair 7/- 



EDSI..2 Double symmetrical 
points, left-hand (2 ft. 



■ •■ 



■ I 



per pair 8/- 



EDSRl Double symmetrical 
points, right* hand 



... 



per pair 6/6 



EDSL1 Double symmetrical 

left-hand (1 ft. 



t;t 









vmw 



** 



FOR CLOCKWORK TRAINS 






Straight rails 



* ## 



*•* per doz. 



Al Curved rails (1 ft. radius] 

PR1 Ki^ht-hand points {] ft. 

radius) 
PL1 Loft -hand points (1 ft 

radius) 



CA2 A cute- an pie crossings 

{for 2 ft radius track) 



▼ 1- T 



each 






per pair 3/6 



p * «• 






... 



PR 2 Right-hand points (2 ft, 

radiusl 
PL2 Left-hand points (2 ft. 

us) 



per pair 3/6 



PPR 2 Parallel points, rigbt-i 

hand >•* «•• »•• I 

PPL2 Parallel points, left- I 

hand ... ... ... f* 

These pomts can be used for | 
either 1 ft. or 2 ft. radius track. J 



per pair 






DC2 Curved rails, double 






track. 2 ft. radius only 



* * * 



Ask your dealer for an illustrated price list. 



} doz. 



MECCANO LIMITED, Binns Road, Liverpool 






*«'»X v.. V 










Z1NE 



xxiii 








TANK 






LOCOMOTIVES 



GAUGE O 



i 




1 Clockwork Tan* 

Locomotive 



Reversing 






Price Iff- 



> 





•E120 (20-volt) Electric 
Tank Locomotive 



Reversing 



Price 20/- 



♦No. 1 Special Clockwork 

Tank Locomotive 



Rfjvtmng 



Pf*« 17/6 








•EPM16 Special Electric Tank 

Locomotive, complete with 
Speed and Reverse Controller 

(6-volt Pormaneni Magnet Typo) 
Reversing. Can be run from a 
6-voli accumulator, or from A.C 

Transformer- 

Price 37/6 



mains (hrough 
Rectifier 



a 



^Lettered and coloured to represent L.M.S.i Q*W*R* § L*N»EJl 

ar $.R* Locomotives* 






MECCANO LTD. 



BINNS ROAD 




OL 13 



im 



It-.. 1 »«* 



."* . 




NEW 






SEARCHLIGHT 

Height 2£" 



" 






Price 



Battery 



I'll 



THIS MINIATURE SEARCHLIGHT is a scale model only 2J" high 




a 



powerful light Leads and clips are 



Beautifully finished and giving 

provided for connecting to flashlamp battery 

■ _ 






SEARCHLIGHT 

on "O" Gauge 
Railway Truck 




Pri 





with Battery 




/ 




t*j-k*r 






THE SEARCHLIGHT on "O" Gauge Railway Truck is a beautifully 

finished model fitted with powerful searchlight, self-contained battery and 
switch. Standard type couplings are supplied and the wheels and chassis are 

of die-cast metal and aluminium. 

GUN ON TRUCK. A high-grade cap-firing gun which shoots projectiles can 

also be supplied mounted on a similar truck at the same price. 



OBTAINABLE 







T ALL GOOD STORES AND TOY SHOPS 



& 



WRITE NOW 



for our latest illustrated price list describing many other fascinating toys 

models from the sole manufacturers and patentees: 



and 



ASTRA PHAROS LTD 



Landor Works, Askew Rd., Shepherds Bush, London W.12 

Tetc phone: Shepherds Bush 2472 








r 




eccano mo 











e even more 




etike! Adde 




touch 



es with ''Plasticine 



n 



can make a lot of difference—a little figure 






here to give that warehouse 'Scale'-a tiled 



roof there, cas 



ks, 




oxes-a 



one 



littl 



e accessories a 




■ 



in 



hund 

thei 



re 




an 




eir correct 



col 



ourings (there are 16 different colours). 



You will 




e 




urprise 







ie effect an 










a 







od 






your models w 





e 







e envy o 



your 



friends. There are many interesting outfits 



of whi 



ic 




a selection is given 




elow 










HARBUTTS PLASTICINE 



COMPLETE MODELLER 4' 



Post free A f 6 



DESIGNER 5'6 and 12'6 

Post free 6'1 and 13'5 






TRAVEL BOX 

[series of six) 2'6 each 



Post free 3' 



Pose free rates for Great Britain, abroad extra 




A 








r 













« 



Write for illustrated price list to: 

Harbutt's Plasticine Ltd., 99, 



i 






n, Bath 




f 






, 






XXIV 



THE 




MAGAZINE 




2- taiSS-0 



FIGURE 









&£*(&//£ 



SPEEDWAYS 
6 II and 126 



r> * 



feLR 



ROLLER 



MODEL TRAINS 



/ 



sts- 



Steam Engine-5 






>i" 



, 



'V 



*n 



1 8 '6 



MOBILE SEAQCH LIGHT 



1 1 



^ - 



L 



■ L 



r 1 * 



p **■ 



Galleok 

12/6 



- -# 



£5 



WOAK 

OUTFIT 



V< 



To 



Steering 

Cars 



AIQ6UNS* PISTOL 






Yi 









BRIGHT PROSPECTS AHEAD! 

for some lucky boys. LUCAS'S store is literally 
packed to the ceiling with toys and games of 



every description. There 



Conjuring 



Make-up Sets, 
Sets, Constructional 



ntry Sets, Flood-lighting 

Gliders, 



Mink, Dinky, Tootstetoys, Hornby Trains, 



and a complete range of Meccano. Tell Dad all 
about these good things NOW. If you want to 



obtain the fullest enjoyment 



cting 



just the 



have 



mind," remember 



the name, LUCAS'S, the rest 



easy. 



SHOP EARLY FOR XMAS THIS YEAR 






i 



The 



Arc 



PHONE. ROYAL 562 



HOUGHTON 






RO PLANES 



Kft 



.' ■ 



■ . i 



o 






DUMMIES 






11 



^%w 



» 



II 



i'* 



K 






Anti -Aircraft Gun 






and 



I* 



■ 



*TH 






■ h *n. 



5tt^-*iBs 



i 






"J 



MOBILE 
UNIT 



\2'e 



7i^37 6 



% 



Hf. 



*4 



It 



#:* 



STAL STEAMERS 









w 



CLAYTON SQUARE, LIVERPOOL.!. 



' 



JLiTflU 






-:* 



I - f 



> 






■• 










-4 



^*) 






1 





) MAGAZINE 



XXV 





s 




Thi 

4-6-2 "Princess Elizabeth" locomotive 






MOD 






L.M.S. 






GAUGE 



is a magnificent Hornby 







e a wor 





record for non-stop steam travel in covering 




mi 





om 




asgow to London 



average spee 




70 m.p, 

Think of the thrill of owning a 

an engine. It includes all the 




eatures 



o 




e a 




locomotive 

coupled driving wheels 

cylinders and motion, tapered 

and fire-box, ova!-heade 

buffers at the front 



-L. ' 



■ . 



ate internal details of ca 

■ I ■ Y I 



an 



_ i 





tender an 






eDia 





r 




ensu 



20-volt automatic 
motor 

■ 

dant power and makes 



engine 




eaviest 







Price, complete with tender, packed in special 
presentation hox § £5 5 




MECCANO 



LIMITED 




ROAD 




13 





that can be built with 
endless 

of Instructions 






92 splendid examples. Price 10/9 




THE MECCANO 











BAILEY'S 



If 



SUPER" PUMP. Celluloid Covered (Made in Two Styles) 



ONE WITH STEEL LINING at 2/- OR ALUMINIUM LINING at 2/3. 15* xf* SIZE 

The linings are SOLID DRAWN, cartridge fashion, each pump being drawn from its own metal blank, 
therefore there are NO solderings or loose pieces to leak. THIS IS THE ONLY SOLID CARTRIDGE 

DRAWN PUMP. MADE ANYWHERE. DO NOT BE MISLED WITH IMITATIONS. 




Apex "Superlite" Celluloid Pump made of best quality Thick Celluloid, highly polished, 15* x** 

at 1/6 each. 



BAILEY'S "SUPER 



ft 




ULOID MUDGUARDS 



Extra Thick Celluloid, Extra Thick Flange. All Steel parts are electro zinced before enamelling 

Price: Black or Black with White end, 4/- per pair. All White, 4/9 per pair. 




"Manufactured by: 

APEX INFLATOR CO. LTD.. 116; Aldridge Road, Perry Barr, Birmingham 



APEX 

MUDGUARDS 

PATENT 
WIRE 

CLIP 

GUARDS ARE 

INSTANTLY 

DETACHABLE 



ADJUSTABLE 




* 



i 



a. 



INTRODUCING THE 

SILK-MOTHS OF THE WORLD 

Have you read my article on this subject in this 
issue of Meccano Magazine? May I send you my 
beautifully illustrated pamphlet on * i I k* moths, 
describing the best way to breed e^ich species, 
their alternative food plants, and the cost of 
living cocoons, eggs and larvae. Price 6d. per 

cony* post free. FROM* L. HUGH NEWMAN, 
"THE BUTTERFLY FARM," BEXLEY, KENT. 



USED MODEL BARGAINS 

Send 4id* for our catalogue of perfect second-hand 

railways and modclst and save money* 

Georges'* 11, Friars Street, Ipswich, 



Your Heigh!: increased 
in 14 days or money 
back! 3*5 inches rapidly 
gained. Amazing Complete Course sent for 5/- 

P.O., or details free. Write Stebbing System, 
Dept M. 28. Dean Road. London N.W.2, 





^™ 



GREAT PRINTING OFFER! 

Boys, hove your name and address printed on your 
tiotcpapcr4 Prices from 6d. For particulars and samples 

send co; G* C, GREAVES. 

9* The Gardens, Coach Road, Whitehaven, Cumberland. 



* 



Casting Moulds for Lead Soldiers. Animals and Novel 

ties* Sample mould 2/9 post paid. Catalogue, stamp 
Industries. 2, Waldetfrave Park, Twickenham* 






JASPER MASKELYNE torn* 

NEST 




Sf.WELL Cabinet 
is perfect in every 




superior 



foreign 




* 



CABINET OF CONJURING TRICKS 

Compiled by Efnest Sewell, who on si* occasions has entertained 
members of th© Royal Family at Windsor. A compiai© assortment 
of the very best tricks and a lancinating Golden Book of Magic. 
10 sizes from If- to 42/-. Send Coupon below {£d. iitamp onfyj 
lor full catalogue which also describes many Games, Novelties 
etc , obtainable at Stores and Toyshops. Address: LONDON 
MAGICAL CO. (Depi. M M.2] f Francis Terrace London N 19 



r 

I Name. 



i 



Address 



■ ■ ■ 



rat* 



ri.,p*. P -. ....,.«» *« » - . . m . * f . . 






►* «• 



- - + - 






**•*-.*«. ■ « . 



MkMf2 



i 

! 

I 



CINEM ATOCR APHS j™*&ft 

CINEMATOGRAPH FILMS 

Standard She only. Write for Catalogue, post 

free. Sample Film and Catalogue 1/- and 2/6 

Filmeries Co.. 57, Lancaster Rd„ Leytonstone. EJ1 

■ ■ ■ 









MINIATURE 

AEROPLANE PILOTS 



Aeroplane Parts Nos 




an 




P100 




Miniature Pilots are now available for fitting to all 
open cockpit machines built with the Nos. 00, f 1 f 2> 
1 Special and 2 Special Aeroplane Constructor Outfits. 
These attractive little figures* which add a wonderful 
couch of realism, are supplied with green coat and 
orange cap f blue coat and red cap, or red coat and 
green cap. Aero Part No. P99, which is suitable for 
fitting to the Nos. OO and O Outfit models, is fixed to a 
special bracket that takes the place of the Propeller 
Shaft Bracket In the Outfit. The special bracket is 
secured by passing bolts through the sides of the 
fuselage Into the threaded holes in the bracket. The 
Propeller Shaft rests in the bearing socket formed 
in the Pilot's body. 

Part No- P100 (illustrated above) Is used fn Nos, l f 
2, 1 Special and 2 Special Outfit models. The Pilot Is 
fixed to a double single bracket ready for bolting to 
the sides of the fuselage* 



p 



rices: 



P99 Aeroplane Pilot 
P100 



*«« 



•! 



7* 



»** 



. . . 



each 4d. 

Ad, 



- 



Meccano Ltd., Binns Road, Liverpool 13 




too 








ainthe"M.M." 

The H M~M, n may be ordered from all Meccano 
dealers, or from any newsagent or bookstall. 

Price Gd. per copy. As a rule, back nu 
cannot be supplied, because we print only 
sufficient copies to fill our standing orders. To 
prevent disappointment, therefore, place a 
regular order either with your dealer, newsagent, 
or direct with this office. ~' 

Meccano Limited, Binns Road, 

Liverpool 13. 





PEA BULBS 




Light up your Railway sta- 
tions, signals, models, mini- 
ature houses, fancy tie pins, Not less than 
alarm clocks, bed lamps, six supplied. 
etc., with these brilliant 4v., 6 tat ij- 
.25 amp,, Opal Pea Bulbs, with 30 ins. 20 (or 2'6 

of flex and M.E.S. Fittings. Light from 6 dm. T'b 

4 v. pocket battery or accumulator. Post Free. 
Spare leads and adaptors, V- perdoz. Foreign. 

H. Franks. Oeot. M. 81 . New Oxford St.. London W.C.1 




THREE SECTIONAL 
CHARTS OF MODERN 

LOCOMOTIVES 
L.M.S., Gt. Western & L.N.E.R 



(4-6-0) 



i »** 



* 



(4-6-0) 

ALL DETAILS SHOWN IN RELIEF. 

Rolled suitable for framing. 

POST FREE- FOUR SHILLINGS. 



I4-6-21 



THE LOCOMOTIVE PUBLISHING CO. LTD., 

3, Amen Corner, London E-C4. 



in 
I/- 

c. 



YOUR OWN NAME 

a cutout punte t size 16 ids* x 4 ins, in 3 colours 
post free. Any christian name, boy or girl* No jig- 
saw has it! Ideal Xmas Gifrl Scad F # 0. to: 

A. D1LLQWAY. 7. Herman Gardens. ||ford t Essex. 



Home 

films c 



Cinernatog 

; Lists. 




■ 

i Mains or Battery* Standard 
Pictures. 13, Renmuit St. f Tooting. 




1 Horsepower Petrol 

horsepower 

Profit shaririK Work*, 





Motor Castings. 9/9. Fractional 

from 5/9. Catalogue 3d. Butler's 
Litilcover, Derby. 



Genuine Barlock-ReminRton-Wooilstock Typewriters 

from £3 5s. Od. Pa the Projectors from 30/-. Hundreds 
of films— send for my lists. Royal Sutcliffc. Light 



Machinery Specialist, 305, KiUinghall Road, Bradford. 



HIPOWER WATER MOTOR 

just the thing to drive your models. Fixes to ordinary 
writer rap, A real engineering job, Full instructions. 
Guaranteed* Usually 3f* 3 our price l/-»each, postage 6d, 

Wells & Son, Wclls-on-Set, Norfolk. M ccwno Stockists* 




WHEN WRITING TO ADVERTISERS 

Readers are urged to observe the 
when writing to advertisers: 

Mention the "M.M." and any special reference 
number quoted in the advertisement. This helps 
the advertisers to give prompt attention. 



1. 



■v 






Sec that Ihe full amount of the price and any 
postage is included. It is unfair hi expect adver- 
tisers to fulfil their undertakings promptly if short 
remittances are sent. 

3- GIVE YOUR FULL ADDRESS* 



THE i 




MENT MANAGER 












MECCANO MAGAZINE, Binns Rd. p LIVERPOOL 13 






-i 






i 






* « 



XXVI 1 



' 














i 








in all your 
(/our kite 




• 






Erects 






i/our soldiers. . 



rBfp 















P-- 




t*~ 






UAVf 




GOOD T/MC- 



t 




SLIGHTLY USED TRIX TWIN RAILWAY GOODS for 

disposal, list l|dL Georges*! ll a Friars Street* Ipswich* 



THE WEBLEY SERVICE AIR RIFLE Mkll 






NO LICENSE REQUIRED TO PURCHASE OR USE AT HOME 



white #au 

DESCRIPTIVE 
F O L D E ft 




This extremely 
accuras© and power- 
ful Air Rifle is ideal (or 



Targot Practice in rhe garden 
or for exterminating Ran and 
similar vermin. 
22 or 177, With leahighl and peepslghb 

WeWeyfi Scott Ltd„87.WeamanSL. Birmingham* 



EQUIP YOUR OWN 
LABORATORY WITH 
APPARATUS AND 

CHEMICALS. 



• PRICES FROM: 



. ! 



t*» 



i- 



WRITE FOR 



Carrlaee Paid 

EST CATALOGUE F R E E I 












(Scientific Dept G,} ( 60, High St 
Stoke Newington, London. N.I 6. 




THI YEAAS MOST INTERESTING 

ftOQKLET OH VAJHA&lf GEARING 

CYCLO GEAR CO. LTD 

POTTERS HILLaiftHINCHAN 6 



r _ 






*/ 



Lever 



If-Fill 



COLD NIB 



State nib 
required. 



w 



by post 

2'8 



ab£ 



CO., 



Royal Exchange, Leeds. 

TAYLOR &COLBRIDGE, 

St* Sepulchre Gate, Doncaster, 



■ 









r 



JOWETT & SOWRY LTD.. 

Southcate, Halifax, Cathedral Street. 

Manchester. 















OIL CAN No. 



hi 





x% 




rr 



Type) 






Polished 







Copper 



Every Meccano and Hornby Train enthusiast 
should add a miniature "K" type oil an to his 

for the otiroosc of oilinc Meccano 




equipment for the purpose of oiling 

s, Hornby Trains, etc The oil is ejected 
drop by drop by depressing the valve, as in the 

full-sized model, and in all other respects the 
offer is perfect. Price 3/6 

Meccano Ltd., Binns Road, Liverpool II* 



MECCANO 
LUBRICATING OIL 



Before commencing to operate 
a Meccano model, or to run 
a Hornby Train, all gears and 
bearings should be oiled 
thoroughly with Meccano Lubri- 
cating Oil. Thfs oil i$ specially 
prepared and is of the right 
consistency for the 
Price per bottle 6d # 



purpose. 



Meccano 



Ltd., 

Liverpool 



Binns 

13, 



Road, 
















p 




♦ 



IS 






You're Lazy 



you won't re 




far in this talk. If you're not — if you have 



tl 



ic courage to 




e 



facts 



■you will want 



to know what special effort on your part 

will enable you to get on. 





a 



Shirk 



er you'll 



always wish for success but never do any- 
thing about it. The earth is cluttered with 

that kind of man. 

You're a 





you will set about doin 




i ' 



something. 



You'll 



get 




e 





necessary training that fits 





you for a good position and good pay. 

■ 

The I.C.S. — International Correspo 

rs you that training. There is 
none better, none more convenient for the 
student. Let us tell you all about it. Just 
fill in the coupon below or write to us in 
any other way. 



COUPON FOR 




BOOKLET 



INTERNATIONAL 



CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS LTD. 
Dept, 218, International Buildings, 

Kingsway, London W.C.2. 

Please send mc free booklet describing I.C.S. Courses 
in the subject I have marked X. I assume noobligntion, 

JOURNALISM 

MARINE ENGINEERING 

MECHANICAL ENG. 
MINING 



ACCOUNTANCY 

ADVERTISING 
AERONAUTICAL ENG. 
AGRICULTURE 
AIR CONDITIONING 

ARCHITECTURE 

BOOK-KEEPING 
BUILDING 

BUSINESS TRAINING 
CHEMICAL ENG. 
COMMERCIAL ART 
CIVIL ENGINEERING 
DIESEL ENGINEERING 
DRAUGHTSMANSHIP 

ELECTRICAL ENG. 
FRENCH AND SPANISH 

GENERAL EDUCATION 
HORTICULTURE 

INSURANCE 

EXAM 

Technical. Professional, 



MOTOR ENGINEERING 

PLUMBING 

RADIO 

SALESMANSHIP 
SANITARY ENG. 
SCIENTIFIC M'G'MENT 
SECRETARIAL WORK 

SHORT-STORY WRITING 

SURVEYING 

TELEVISION 

TEXTILE MANUF'G 

WINDOW DRESSING 

WOODWORKING 
WORKS MANAGEMENT 



NATIONS: 

Civil Service, 



Matriculation 



OLU-i C ■ 1/ ii I J«p ■ V t4 til* i lt«l C- i m « i » * iiifiiiiMUi ■ i.**.*.***..,!*.!*.* * . * 

Name. ,„> 




* M * w t 



Address 






+ . . 



■ * 



■ . m 



Qreatest, 





a 



nd 




famous of all institutions de' 
voted to spare-time trainingby 

the postal method. Branches 
in 30 countries, students in 50. 

















# * ■ 



XXVI II 






' 



READERS' SALES 

Header* should note that all advertisements of Hornby 

Train* and other Meccano products included in th\s 
column relate to items no longer featured in the cat&Ugue* 
Advertisements of current products cannot be acccf 
for this column* 







"M^M,," bound volumes, 1927, 1923; unbound 1929- 
IykvI, Any ofiVrs over carriage accepted— North, 




one, Farnham. 



60/- Red /Green arid Nickel Meccano. 35/-, or offer. 
Ro$coe* 59, Noham Road, Croydon. 

Sale. Eassett-Lowke Electric Speed Boat, Cost 257-. 

Used twice. Take 15/-%— Clancy, 9, The Elms, Dearnley, 
l,ittleborougfa t Lanes. 

Complete Set Coronation Colonials and Dominions; 
1,500 really tine Stamps; 100 Air Mails- These three 
collections each in separate albums, together with 
1937 S.G. Cat. for £$ or separately. — Hiley, 53, Melrose 
Avenue, Afitcham, Surrey. 

Sale. Two complete sets Red-Green Meccano, cost 
£3/10/- per set, sell 3tl/- per seL Also write for list of 
spare parts, etc-— W. JX Bostock, Spring Hill, lean, 
Stokc*ou-Trent, 

Sale, Unused Trix L.ALS. Tank, 12/6- **$$M.% n 
1931-7, 3/- per volume. Enlarged No. 2 Red-Green 

Meccano, 2c Motor, 12/6- All perfect* Carriage paid 
Francis, 265, Teebey Lane, Bebington, Cheshire. 

Sale* Complete Gauge O Layout, 6 -volt, 2 Loco- 
motives. Cost £15. Ac* pt £6 or nearest offer.— Sherris, 
7S # Crossbrook Street, Cheshtmt, Herts, 

Sale. 



79 



"U.M.'s," 1931-1937 inclusive, 1932 
1937 incomplete, £1 or nearest. - 

healh Park, London S.IC.3. 



and 
Carnegie, 2, Black* 



ked-Cireen Meccano, including Clockwork Motor 

1l>/- (iamage Yacht, 7/6. All f^ood condition. 

B. Quekett, 116, Cavchffl Road, Belfast. 

Sale. Steam Engines, Bowman, 13/-; Mersey, 10/-. 
Fountaiiiie, PolUcottj- Aylesbury. 

1933-1937 inclusive. 

, "Brooklands," 




Murdoch, 






Sale. Meccano Magazines, 
IVrftn i . oniition. 14, - or oiler. 
Datchet, Bucks. 

Wanted. Poker work Set. State price, etc. 
Udny Station, Aberdeenshire. 

£5 worth Red- Green Meccano, clockwork Motor, in 
Cabinet, 30, ■'-. — 1, Lastfield (hardens, Dageoham, Essex. 

lor Sale. Gauge O Trains, Rolling Stock, Track. 
Cost £5. k. d -Green Meccano. Cost £2/10/-. £2/ 10/- or 
offers,— C.trdell, 1, Aberdeen Terrace, London S.E.3. 



Sale 



41 



Meccano Magazines," May 1926-Deceniber 



19H3, good condition. What otters? Five Binders also.— 
G. Gildersleeve, Melropole Hotel, Hastings. 

Sale. L.M.C., L.M.5. 4-4-0 Clockwork Tank Loco. 
Cost 65/-. Take 



65/-. Take 27/6. 

Kingston, Surrey, 



Payne, 39, Revell Road r 






Sale- Nickel- Plated Meccano Strips, Pulleys, Axl 



es 



"BLM/s, 



t» 



P. C. 




" ? 



Main Street, Ballviuoney. 



Co* Antrim, NX 

Sale. Contents of Home Laboratory. Chemicals t 
Apparatus, 2 Portable Wall Cabinets. Excellent chance 
for real enthusiast. Write Lists, — Campion, S3, Wood 

Lane, islewortb, Middlesex* 

Large Meccano stock, Red-Green, new condition, 
£16 worth, :* Motors, take £8/111/-. List— 12, Kiclimond 
Road, Staines. 

Bargain!!! 20,000 Foreign Stamps, the lot, t|/-. 
Cash or C.O.D.— Cowie, 4, Kings Koad, Kingston. 

Sale. 2,400 Stamps, Movalcaf Album. Oilers? Gauge 
Kailway. — Phillip:-, : '«i. \\ averti*^ N*,,,k, UvfrpOOl, 



Exchange Club. Send books 50% on your prices. Book* 
sent monthly* J* A. Bryan, Ashbocking Stores* Suffolk. 



FREE packet U.S# Commemorati ves to applicants for 
id* approvals* Carlile, 120, Bournbrdok. Birmingham. 



HALFPENNY APPROVALS, mounts and sec Charkhan 
Ptcts. free. Thos. Marsh. Boynton Av. t Glasgow WJ. 




Issue Bonus Approval Service* 



Trowbridge, Wilts* 



11 Morocco K.E.VI1I, complete mint 1/- 

iCG.Vt to 3d* mint, 5 Fiji* 5 St. Helena, 5 Ascension, 

5 Basutobnd, 5 Swaziland at 10if. per set* 

6 Dorainica f 7 Turks Island at 1/1 per set- 
Postage lid. extra. Selections at 30 for 6d. 

J. R. MORRIS. 9. AUDLEY ROAD, FOLKESTONE, KENT. 



FREE! 2 beautiful sets and many other gifts with 

4d. in the 1 ; - discount, and I will 



my 



'approvals' 



pay postage. Many new issues-send a card and you 
will be more than pleased at the value you receive. 

Do not delay, send now, 

G* ELLIS, 41, Ramsay Road, Headington, Oxford. 



FREE 



ZAMBESI PACKET 



FREE 




A packet of 25 interesting and attractive stamps are 

* entirely FREE and POST FREE to all applicants 
for approvals. This packet contains only PICTORIAL 
STAMPS including COSTA RICA National Exhibition, 
CYPRUS George VI, MOZAMBIQUE Zambesi Bridge 

commemorative* catalogued 1/** Bosnia, Sarajevo 
murders, German commemorattves, Newfoundland, 

Mozambique* Spanish Morocco* etc. 

You must send for this packet now, a postcard will do. 
A. J. SAYWELL. Barrett Chambers, 38, Queen St,. Oxford. 









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1 Air New 

1 Alfred Whitaker, A Railway Inventor 






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Books to Read 

Competition Corner 



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1 From Our Readers 

I Fun with Hornby-Dublo Trains 

1 Guild Pages 
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632 
663 
626 
664 



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High-Speed Fighters and Bombers 
Hornby Railway Company Pa^es 
llov the Locomotive Works- — L 









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j Large Scale Pea Canning 

1 Lorri^ of the Thames ... 

1 Making Geographical Globes 

I Man-Made Lightning „, 



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650-1 1 

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610 

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Mcnk I- Building Contests 

Model-Building Contests Results 
New Meccano Models ,„ 



• *. 






Oban to Statfa and lona 



| Of General Interest 

I Photography 

I .Railway News ... 



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Stamp Gossip 



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"Twentieth Century Limited" 
World's Giant Silk Moths 



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QUEEN ELIZABETH 



ff 



Lists of 



Photographs of the new vessel after launch now avail- 
able, Send3d> for specimen postcard and our illustrated 

over l t 150 different real photographs of 
LinerSi Freighters* etc., 2d, each. 2/- per do«n t post 
free. New photographs include: * 'Clyde Coast,* 1 
"aiicia," "Rochester Castle," "Essex," "City of 
Bombay" and "Imperial." B. & A. FEIL0EN (MM), 
12. HARLECH ROAD. BMJNDELLSANDS, LIVERPOOL 23. 

(Trade Enquiries invited.) 






FREE PHOTOGRAPH 

to readers of "Meccano Magazine" sending 4d. 

for Use of 1,000 titles and specimen card of 

Railway, Aeroplane or Ship Photographs, 

"SIR NIGEL GRESLEY" 

FAIREY "BATTLE" 
"QUEEN ELIZABETH" 

REAL PHOTOGRAPHS CO. 

(Dopt. M), Cooper's Buildings, Liverpool 1» 







_ 











Itegisttred at G.P.Q., Lotulon, for transmission by 

g&muiian Magazine * 




EDITORIAL AND ADVERTISING OFFICE: 

Liverpool 13, England. 

Telegrams: "Mtccaiio, Liverpool." 



i 



Publication Date. The *M.M: % is published on 
the 1st of each month and may bf* ordered froox any 

Meccano dealer, or from any bookstall or newsagent, 
price 6d, per copjr* It will be mailed direct from 

this office, 4/— for *>in issues and 8/— for twelve issues. 

To Contributors, The Editor will consider articles 
arid photographs of general interest and payment will 
be made for those published. Whilst every care will 

1>- Uk.m td anit h s. et<., submitte-d, the Editor eaiuidi 

for auv loss or damage, A 



accept resjM>iiSibibty lor any loss or 

stamped addressed envelope of the requisite siae should 

be sent where the contribution is to be returned if 

unacc 














Sales and Wants. Private advertisements 
(Le* f not trade) are charged Id. per word, minimum 1/^. 
"ash with order. Editorial and Advertising matters 
should not be dealt with on the same sheet of paper. 

Small Advertisements. 1/6 per line (average seven 
words to the line), or 16/- per inch (average 12 lines 
to the inch). Cash with order. 



Display. Quotations for 




bookings, and 



latest net sale figuresj will be sent on request. 

Press Day, etc. Copy should he sent as early m 
the month as possible for insertion in following issue. 

We usually close for press on or before 6th of each 

month for following issue. Half tone blocks up to 
lud screen. 

Proofs of advertisements will be sent when possible 

for space bookings of not less than half-an-mcb. 

■ 

Voucher copies. Sent free to advertisers booking 
one inch or over. Other advertisers desiring vouchers 

should add 8d. to their remittance and should order 
voucher copy at same time. 

Remittances. Postal Orders and Cheques should be 

made payable to Meccano Ltd. 




Ordering the "M*M/' Overseas 

Readers Overseas and in foreign countries may 
order the "Meccano Magazitie'* from regular Meccano 
dealers or direct from this office* The price and 
subscription rates are as above, except in the cases of 

Australia, where the price is 1/2 per copy (postage 
extra), and the subscription rates 8/- for six months 
and 16/- for 12 months (post free)! Canada* where 
the price is 10c. per Copy, and the subscription 
65c. for six months, and $1.25 for 12 months (postpaid). 

The U&A . price is 1 5c. per copy, and the subscription 
rates $1 and 52 for 6 and 12 months respectively 
(post free) . 

Overseas readers are reminded that th*- prices 
shown throughout the "MJ/' are those relating to 

the United Kingdom and Northern Ireland. Current 
Overseas Price Lists of Meccano Products will be mailed 
free on request to any of the undermentioned agencies. 
Prices of other goods advertiscnl may be obtained 
direct from the firms concerned. 

CANADA: Meccano Ltd., 187-189, Church St. /.Toronto. 






UNITED STATES: Meccano Co. oi America Inc., 

New Haven, Conn., Meccano Co. of America 

Inc., 200, Fifth Av., New York. 

AUSTRALIA: Messrs. E. G, Page & Co., 

52, Clarence Street, Sydney*, N.S.W. 

\f\V 7F ALAND: Models Liinjited, Ihird iloor, 

Pavkel's Buildings, 9, Auzac Avenue (P.O. 

Box 129), Auckland, C.L 





SOUTH AFRICA: Mr. A. L. Harris (P.O. Box UW), 

142, Market Street, Johannesburg. 

INDIA: Karachi: Daryanamal and Bros., JQphinstonc 

, Bombay; Bombay Sports Depot, 
d Talao, Calcutta; Bombay Sports 
Depot, 2, Lindsay Street, Madras; Bom- 
bay Sports Depot, 162, Mount Road. 

The Editor wishes to make known the fact that 

it is not necessary for any reader to pay more than 

the published price. Anyone who is being overcharged 
should lodge a complaint wiih the Meccano agent 
in his country or write direct to the Editor, 



WEBLEY AIR PISTOLS 



Marvellously 
accurate far 
target practice. 



No license required to purchase 




or use at home. 

Senior 45'-, Mark 1 32'6. 
Junior 2 1'~, Webley AirRifie95' 

Write for List. Webley & Scott Ltd. 



87, Weaman 




Birmingham, Eng. 









— 





MAGAZINE 



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Meccano 



OF COMPLETE OUTFITS 







THE MECCANO MAGAZINE 




roousiten nv M'^CA'MO Lxo M .-Buiitt Road, Liverpool IX Rsql^d 

'/Vintaf for John iVmiAintton tJd. LecJ* ani LonJon